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Topic: Bond, James Bond
Message: Posted by: Cliffg37 (Oct 10, 2019 09:33AM)
For all you James Bond fans out there, you are probably aware that James is seldom bested in a fight. He can be hit over the head from behind, drugged, gassed, etc. But usually wins in man-to-man fist-to-fist encounters.

Can anyone suggest what style of fighting James uses?

Near as I can tell there is little more to it that brutal street fighting.
Roger Moore, when faced with an enemy once took a boxing stance, but he did not box.
Daniel Craig is the most brutal of Bonds in a fight, but other than a brilliant Parkour opening sequence, I've never seen martial arts from him.
Most of them have shown good MacGyver skills when it comes to picking up something around them to use as a weapon.

Any thoughts on this?

Is there a British martial art? How are real British agents taught to fight?
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Oct 10, 2019 11:04AM)
James Bond is a girl.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 10, 2019 11:27AM)
[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krav_Maga]Krav Maga[/url].
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 10, 2019 11:50AM)
Bill beat me to it.

I first encountered the style in the 90's. We showed some Mossad officers how to use the PR-24, and they shared interrogation and fighting techniques.

The intent of the style is to never leave your feet. If you understand the organization you know why. Almost 100% of their life is within the border of the enemy. In that part of the world being on the ground ends in death.

There is way more to the style as used by the Mossad than is taught in most classes. It can be an incredibly brutal style by necessity and design.

But as for what ol James uses it is a style that is invented for Hollywood movies and little more at first. The latter movies got into more defined style.

If you want, watch the John Wick movies. That has some pretty defined techniques.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 10, 2019 12:27PM)
[quote]On Oct 10, 2019, magicfish wrote:
James Bond is a girl. [/quote]


No, that's "Nomi!"
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 12, 2019 08:27PM)
[quote]On Oct 10, 2019, magicfish wrote:
James Bond is a girl. [/quote]Rumor has it the code "007" gets reassigned.

So would "007" becoming "888" be so bad?
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 15, 2019 05:56PM)
[quote]On Oct 12, 2019, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
[quote]On Oct 10, 2019, magicfish wrote:
James Bond is a girl. [/quote]Rumor has it the code "007" gets reassigned.

So would "007" becoming "888" be so bad? [/quote]

"888?" Bond is retired in the new film, Leiter calls him out of retirement for a job he needs help with, and he works with the "new" "007," who is a woman named "Nomi."

I see this ending one of several ways;

Nomi burns out on the field and retires, the number going back to Bond. (Not very likely, as it's too close to what Eve Moneypenny did.)
Nomi gets killed on the job and Bond regains the "007" designation. (Very probable)
Nomi turns out to BE the "big bad" they've been seeking and Bond has to kill her himself. (Not very likely, but not impossible.)
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 15, 2019 05:59PM)
Actually, in the book version of "You Only Live Twice," Bond, completely burned out and expecting to be removed from service, gets a "promotion" to the Diplomatic Corp., to go to Japan and negotiate a code exchange. His new designation for the mission is "7777," it would be interesting if they referenced that in this new film.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 15, 2019 06:38PM)
I have SERIOUS doubts as to if they will flat out kill the first female 007 designation on the first time out. I also really doubt that they will immediately turn her bad. Those just do not make any sense at all.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 15, 2019 06:39PM)
Oh, I did have a fourth idea. Bond either dies or goes back into retirement, and the film series is now "007" with different characters getting the designation over the course of the series.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 16, 2019 02:43PM)
Wasn't he a ninja in one?
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 16, 2019 04:52PM)
[quote]On Oct 16, 2019, critter wrote:
Wasn't he a ninja in one? [/quote]You Only Live Twice had a school of ninja.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 17, 2019 04:40PM)
I seem to remember him learning Judo and having terrible make up as part of his ninja training but it's been a while.
Looks like The Rock's grandfather was a fight choreographer on it so some pro wrestling too.
I seem to recall Judo Gene LeBell doing some bond movies and Judo was one of the real MI5 styles in Fleming's day.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 17, 2019 04:40PM)
I think he also fenced.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 17, 2019 06:21PM)
Here's what I found about fencing: https://www.jamesbondlifestyle.com/articles/leon-paul-fencing-equipment-die-another-day
Message: Posted by: tommy (Oct 17, 2019 08:02PM)
He fights dirty.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 18, 2019 01:08AM)
I remembered another thing about the ninja in the James Bond books is that they inspired Stephen K Hayes to go to Japan in search of ninja and he was one of the key players in the 80s ninja boom. Maybe THE most important figure in the US in the "real world."
It's certain that his instructor, Masaaki Hatsumi, was skilled in Jujutsu but it's still debatable whether his ninjutsu lineage is fully on the up and up. Nonetheless, Hayes is a very good martial artist and instructor.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 18, 2019 10:32AM)
I think he is the single reason for the popularity of the style in the 90's in America. He himself was a gifted athlete. Whether the style worked as well for anyone else was always the question.

He is a great instructor and salesman.

Because of the nature if Ninjutsu and the way it started, and the 74 or so different families having a defined style wad difficult to begin with. Often they used broken Samurai swords. The tradition is shrouded in mystery and myth for a reason.

All to say I agree critter!
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Oct 18, 2019 10:54AM)
Years ago I stumbled across some television segment comparing various martial arts.

They had a contraption comprising, if I recall correctly, five platforms (each a circular disk about 1 foot in diameter), each atop a relatively thin, metal post; the posts were flexible (so that if you weren't balanced over the center of the platform, it would sway and tip), and graduated from about one foot high to about five feet high.

They had practitioners of the different martial arts try to climb this thing: standing on the lowest platform, gaining their balance, then moving to the next, and so on. Most handled the shortest with ease, struggled with the second, and fell off when they tried the third. Karate, tae kwon do, judo, muay thai, whatever.

Then came the ninjutsu artist. Not only did he make it to the highest platform, he was bounding from one platform to the next and back like an [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibex]ibex[/url]. It was mesmerizing to watch.
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Oct 18, 2019 08:13PM)
I have James Bonds book... He's a bird watcher.
https://www.amazon.com/Black-White-Birds-West-Indies/dp/4871876470/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=james+bond+birds&qid=1571447534&sr=8-1
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 18, 2019 10:13PM)
[quote]On Oct 18, 2019, Slim King wrote:
I have James Bonds book... He's a bird watcher.
https://www.amazon.com/Black-White-Birds-West-Indies/dp/4871876470/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=james+bond+birds&qid=1571447534&sr=8-1 [/quote]

Yeah, Fleming didn't ask for permission before "borrowing" the name, either. It's a good thing the real Mr. Bond had a sense of humor. Once the books (and movies) took off, he had a hell of a time convincing people he really WAS "James Bond."
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 19, 2019 03:34PM)
[quote]On Oct 18, 2019, S2000magician wrote:
Years ago I stumbled across some television segment comparing various martial arts.

They had a contraption comprising, if I recall correctly, five platforms (each a circular disk about 1 foot in diameter), each atop a relatively thin, metal post; the posts were flexible (so that if you weren't balanced over the center of the platform, it would sway and tip), and graduated from about one foot high to about five feet high.

They had practitioners of the different martial arts try to climb this thing: standing on the lowest platform, gaining their balance, then moving to the next, and so on. Most handled the shortest with ease, struggled with the second, and fell off when they tried the third. Karate, tae kwon do, judo, muay thai, whatever.

Then came the ninjutsu artist. Not only did he make it to the highest platform, he was bounding from one platform to the next and back like an [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibex]ibex[/url]. It was mesmerizing to watch. [/quote]


It's interesting how things come full circle. I was extremely impressed watching the founder of Parkour, David Belle, run up a climbing wall that people had died trying to climb. Just ran right up with it seeming like his feet barely touched the handholds.
Then his former training partner, Sebastien Foucan, who helped create parkour and later split to form freerunning, was the freerunner in Daniel Craig's first Bond movie.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 19, 2019 03:35PM)
Https://youtu.be/lnu1KyYOZiU
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 19, 2019 03:50PM)
[quote]On Oct 18, 2019, Dannydoyle wrote:
I think he is the single reason for the popularity of the style in the 90's in America. He himself was a gifted athlete. Whether the style worked as well for anyone else was always the question.

He is a great instructor and salesman.

Because of the nature if Ninjutsu and the way it started, and the 74 or so different families having a defined style wad difficult to begin with. Often they used broken Samurai swords. The tradition is shrouded in mystery and myth for a reason.

All to say I agree critter! [/quote]

I think some of the stuff in his books that was added to look cool isn't super realistic like the flips but some of the standing grappling principles are solid. That could be said about a lot of martial arts though. Even the ostensibly practical Bruce Lee added flying kicks to sell his stuff. Still looks cool 😂
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 19, 2019 06:43PM)
Yeah.

I had an instructor who would deball anyone who threw a kick for any reason. Why? Simply because your feet serve a much more important function. Locomotion. Plus there about 20 things that can be done once a skilled opponent has your foot and 19 of them result in your death. (That is making a point not statistics to look up.)

He was teaching survival fighting, not tournament. Preparing for fights you just cannot lose was the point. Not much of it was elegant or artfully done but kept a lot of cops alive so it served a purpose. Ninjutsu strikes me as the same thing.
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 29, 2019 01:14PM)
[quote]On Oct 19, 2019, critter wrote:
[quote]On Oct 18, 2019, S2000magician wrote:
Years ago I stumbled across some television segment comparing various martial arts.

They had a contraption comprising, if I recall correctly, five platforms (each a circular disk about 1 foot in diameter), each atop a relatively thin, metal post; the posts were flexible (so that if you weren't balanced over the center of the platform, it would sway and tip), and graduated from about one foot high to about five feet high.

They had practitioners of the different martial arts try to climb this thing: standing on the lowest platform, gaining their balance, then moving to the next, and so on. Most handled the shortest with ease, struggled with the second, and fell off when they tried the third. Karate, tae kwon do, judo, muay thai, whatever.

Then came the ninjutsu artist. Not only did he make it to the highest platform, he was bounding from one platform to the next and back like an [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibex]ibex[/url]. It was mesmerizing to watch. [/quote]


It's interesting how things come full circle. I was extremely impressed watching the founder of Parkour, David Belle, run up a climbing wall that people had died trying to climb. Just ran right up with it seeming like his feet barely touched the handholds.
Then his former training partner, Sebastien Foucan, who helped create parkour and later split to form freerunning, was the freerunner in Daniel Craig's first Bond movie. [/quote]

I remember a critic of that film complaining that "bad guys always end up going where they can't get away." And I thought; did you actually SEE this movie, or at lease this sequence? The guy clearly had control over the entire chase, and it was BOND who was struggling to keep up!
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Oct 29, 2019 01:18PM)
[quote]On Oct 19, 2019, critter wrote:
Https://youtu.be/lnu1KyYOZiU [/quote]

Very impressive, very VERY impressive. I certainly couldn't do it.

But I have to wonder, how much prep time does he have? If you just brought him to a street, unknown to him, could he do any of this stuff? Or would he have to walk the street a few times and get comfortable with what was available?

Also, I know it's "snarky" of me, but the shot of the two people leaping from the rock and vaulting over the fence? I couldn't help but think; "Guys? The gate over there to your right? It's open!"