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Topic: Non-gaffed versions of McDonald Aces?
Message: Posted by: TeddyBoy (Nov 8, 2019 03:36PM)
I have been impressed at the number of folks that think McDonald Aces is the best ace assembly. For example, Darwin Ortiz in Strong Magic opines that it is "the most powerful of all ace assemblies..." However I try to avoid using gaffed decks/cards. At the risk of appearing quite naive, is there an non-gaffed version of McDonald Aces? If so, where would I find it?
Message: Posted by: CardGuyMike (Nov 8, 2019 04:30PM)
McDonald's Aces is really just an ace assembly, so a non-gaffed version of McDonald's Aces is really just a non-gaffed ace assembly. There are countless ways to do ace assemblies -- John Bannon alone has a bunch of them. L&L Publishing has 3 volumes of Ace Assemblies (World's Greatest Magic) pulling together routines from a bunch of great magicians.
Message: Posted by: TeddyBoy (Nov 8, 2019 08:21PM)
Thanks Mike. I have several candidates for ace assemblies, probably settling on Jazz Aces. However I was specifically interested in McDonald because several members here think it is the best one. I think three volumes of ace assemblies would be overkill. Thanks again.
Message: Posted by: foolsnobody (Nov 9, 2019 01:35AM)
Most one at a time ace assemblies show each ace in the leader packet after it "travels." McDonalds does not. It shows the leader packet at the end as all aces, even though the aces are vanished from the other packets one at a time. Which is better, presentationally? ***ed if I know. How about the old fashioned effects where the aces are made to vanish all at once as well? Which effect is better, and which is more fooling?

In a torn and restored effect, is a piece by piece restoration better or worse than a flash restoration?

I guess it at least partially depends upon the arc of the entire show. Should I have posted this in Food for Thought?
Message: Posted by: kentfgunn (Nov 9, 2019 11:47PM)
McDonald's Aces uses gaffed cards. If you don't use those gaffs you're NOT doing McDonald's Aces. The original question makes no sense to me.

I don't think you're being naive. You're certainly confusing me. If you don't want to use gaffed cards pick a different Ace assembly. You will not be doing McDonald's Aces.

Could you exactly replicate the effect with sleight of hand? If you don't know that the routine is defined by those gaffs, no you don't know enough to construct such a routine.

Learn the routine using the gaffs.
Message: Posted by: Poof-Daddy (Nov 11, 2019 10:00PM)
[quote]On Nov 10, 2019, kentfgunn wrote:
McDonald's Aces uses gaffed cards. If you don't use those gaffs you're NOT doing McDonald's Aces. The original question makes no sense to me. [/quote]

Totally agree with this statement. If the 3 volumes of Ace Assembly DVDs are too much. You might consider John Bannon’s “Dear Mr Fantasy” book as it has a chapter on a few really good ones without the overkill.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Nov 12, 2019 02:39PM)
You could change the gaff, but since there's a packet under a volunteer's hand, you'd have to compromise the effect to use [i]only[/i] a borrowed pack of cards.

Here's an example (H. Sawa's routine) of what can be done if you change the effect: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ca2VtaPTHqc
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Nov 12, 2019 03:25PM)
One of the cool things that McD's Aces achieves is that the aces magically disappear from each packet, only to reappear in the last packet that has been in plain sight the entire time.

If that vanishing aspect is what you want to more or less replicate without gaffed cards, then you might want to learn a version of Collins Aces. (However, the reassembly will not be in one of the remaining face-down piles.) Martin Nash has one of the more popular versions where the four aces are recovered by spelling to them; another version with a different reassembly is in a really cool and under-the-radar book by Bruce Elliot, "Classic Secrets of Magic."

But who am I to argue with Kent Gunn? Learn the routine using the gaffs!
Message: Posted by: JoeHohman (Nov 12, 2019 03:27PM)
Oops, it might be Bruce Elliott. Two t's. Sorry about that!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Nov 14, 2019 07:40PM)
It helps to pick an objective, be it the effect itself or a condition on performing, say with a borrowed pack (uno, bridge sized...).

If you are using your own pack of cards - learning how to introduce and then remove "helper" cards is worth your time.

How about that Sawa routine?
Message: Posted by: Jerskin (Nov 19, 2019 03:26PM)
I've never seen a non gaffed version that looks as good as MacDonald's. I see people spelling it McDonald. Invented by One Arm MacDonald.
Since there are only 3 gaffs you could do a lot of other effects with the deck first.
Message: Posted by: CardGuyMike (Feb 6, 2020 09:54AM)
[quote]On Nov 8, 2019, CardGuyMike wrote:
McDonald's Aces is really just an ace assembly, so a non-gaffed version of McDonald's Aces is really just a non-gaffed ace assembly. There are countless ways to do ace assemblies -- John Bannon alone has a bunch of them. L&L Publishing has 3 volumes of Ace Assemblies (World's Greatest Magic) pulling together routines from a bunch of great magicians. [/quote]

AlakazamUSA has these 3 DVDs on sale now for $2.90 each.

https://www.alakazamusa.com/product/ace-assemblies-worlds-greatest-magic-v1-by-ll-publishing/
https://www.alakazamusa.com/product/ace-assemblies-worlds-greatest-magic-v2-by-ll-publishing/
https://www.alakazamusa.com/product/ace-assemblies-worlds-greatest-magic-v3-by-ll-publishing/
Message: Posted by: jimgerrish (Feb 6, 2020 02:21PM)
In 2012, then Wiz Kid Qua-Fiki came up with a new way to perform the Ace Assembly trick that he called "McFiki's JUMBO Aces" and published in The Wizards' Journal #23-08. He wanted to perform it with jumbo cards and have spectators able to hold the cards in their own hands as the aces mysteriously vanished and then reappeared together.

As he grew older, by 2017 going under his real name of Al-Quadir Marsh, he revised his Ace Assembly using my new principle of "Attractive Cards" and published the results as "McD's JUMBO Aces" in The Wizards' Journal #33-10. Once again Jumbo Cards are used, but the folders are gone and the vanishes and ultimate reappearance happens rapidly and visibly, right up until the ending with the entire deck of cards vanishing.

For the purists and pedants, Jon W. McDonald (1907-c.1982) went by the nickname of "One-Arm Mac" which is where the spelling of his name got confused. His routine was first published under the name "MacDonald's Aces", but no harm is done if you respell it "McDonald's Aces". Just perform it with the gaffs "Mac" used himself, or the new gaffs provided by "Qua-Fiki" and Al-Quadir Marsh.