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Topic: Not new but returning....help!!!!!
Message: Posted by: reno55 (Mar 20, 2020 12:22PM)
I used to do cards quite awhile ago. To say I am rusty is an understatement at this point. I feel more like I am starting over.....

So I have been working on shuffles, cuts etc the basics. Scared of double lifts which I was never good at anyhow :(

What is the best way to get in shape with where I was before? Just practice each basic over and over repeatedly?
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Mar 20, 2020 12:32PM)
Or pick up my THE MAGIC BOOK.
Message: Posted by: BCS (Mar 20, 2020 01:18PM)
I too would recommend the Magic Book.

I suffer from arthritis and nerve damage to my hand... revisiting many of the methods in the Magic Book, I have found are possible with my conditions. I totally rely on Harry’s Jog Shuffle and Instead of Pass.... great stuff.

I still rank The Magic Book as one of my favorites.

Take care,
Bruce
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Mar 20, 2020 06:28PM)
Thank you, Bruce. We'll see if reno55 pays attention.
Message: Posted by: BCS (Mar 20, 2020 09:12PM)
You are welcome Harry!
Message: Posted by: reno55 (Mar 21, 2020 12:25PM)
Harry is that available digital?
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Mar 21, 2020 12:59PM)
No; regular in-hand book only. Go to harryloraynemagic.com to learn more about it. Or - perhaps this post from another thread will help you...


"In 1978 (aged 14) my Christmas present was The Magic Book by Harry Lorayne. Maybe hard for teenagers these days to believe but back then, there were families who did not have a lot of money; and apart from a few sweets (candy) a book would potentially be your main present.

When I started reading Harry's The Magic Book, I felt as if I'd been transported to a parallel universe; whereby superb close-up magic, with every-day items, was indeed possible.

As I type this post sat at my kitchen table, there are 2 books in front of me - may the Lord strike me dead on the spot if I'm lying. Harry's 'The Magic Book' and Quantum Leaps (I was cross referencing something last night). I'm looking at The Magic Book as I type. It's battered and bruised - having been regularly read. More than any other magic book that I own, there's bits of torn cigarette packets with notes written on, sticking out of it. The odd torn playing card with other references scribbled. And of course, the more recent post-it note.

The fact is this book has been my inspiration in magic for nearly 40 years. I have used literally everything within. Despite, like many of us in our adult lives, having wasted a lot of money over the years on the latest magic 'flim flam' it IS the material within this book that I return to time and time again. Because one thing I have learnt about how magic is perceived by an audience is that you earn the greatest respect by performing with borrowed, or 'normal' items. For example, there is hardly anything within the card section that cannot be performed with a beat-up, borrowed pack of cards. Nothing within the coin section that needs expensive gaffs (in order to produce a similar effect in the eyes of spectators). Where else can you get so much workable material with a piece of paper & a pencil? A handkerchief, table items, etc.

What's more, it taught me the most important elements of magical entertainment - presentation, routining and misdirection.

It also taught me a very, very important lesson. That it is the basic, clearly defined easy to follow plot that gets the best reaction.

Over the years, I've spent time and money learning different versions of 'The Colour Changing Deck'; or buying gaffs to get Aces to transpose, etc. I've spent money on further gaffs to get coins to go through a table; or pass from hand to hand. I've bought (and sold on) these gimmicks and flim-flam; along with countless others that achive matrix-style routines, etc. The reason being that all most gimmicks do is over-prove what you don't need to be over-proving anyway.

The classics of magic will live forever; because they have an easy to follow plot. When you use ungaffed or borrowed items and throw them into the mix, it's just so much more rewarding. Added to which 'less is more'. If you can go out with minimal props, you will generally work harder on your presentation - because you are building upon the basics - by actually using the basics. Does that make sense? I hope it does. In other words, you tend to put more energy into your performance. A prop isn't doing the work for you. I've worked with other magicians that rush at break-neck speed from prop to prop; akin to a magic dealer demo (only to then vanish to re-set their gimmicks). However, arrive at a table; borrow a few contrasting coins and a table napkin, and you are ready to entertain. And what I can genuinely say to guys (still reading my rambling here) is that people aren't stupid. If they can see you are working AND entertaining them with what are clearly not 'magic props' you will get one hell of a lot of respect.....and in many cases, you will stand out.

Harry (I believe) wrote this book for people who had an interest in starting out performing magic. It has the clearest of instruction; and covers so many useful principles of magic.

I would not only unreservedly recommend this book to people starting out; but also to any magician that wants to make a living as a professional, magical entertainer.

Indeed, it's title of 'THE Magic Book' could not be more deserving.

It is, in my honest opinion, the GREATEST book of magic ever produced.

Words cannot express my most sincere gratitude and thanks, to the Master himself.......Mr Harry Lorayne."

Barry Allen (Merc Man)
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/e
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
Message: Posted by: BCS (Mar 21, 2020 02:01PM)
I like this book so much that I have 4 copies... original hardback, 2 soft bound (1 with lots of hand written notes) and the hardback reprint.

Take care,
Bruce
Message: Posted by: thegreatscungilli (May 10, 2020 08:50AM)
I also have a little gizmo called a dyna flex..it is a little exercise device that really helps work on your hand, finger and wrist strength and flexibility
Message: Posted by: AsadUllah (May 11, 2020 10:36AM)
[quote]On Mar 20, 2020, reno55 wrote:
I used to do cards quite awhile ago. To say I am rusty is an understatement at this point. I feel more like I am starting over.....

So I have been working on shuffles, cuts etc the basics. Scared of double lifts which I was never good at anyhow :(

What is the best way to get in shape with where I was before? Just practice each basic over and over repeatedly? [/quote]


I shall give you brotherly advice go for Ellusionist Crash Course Volume 1 and 2, I still have both dvds, you will get everything you want, shuffles, controls tricks.
Message: Posted by: EndersGame (May 11, 2020 08:34PM)
[quote]On Mar 21, 2020, reno55 wrote:
I used to do cards quite awhile ago. To say I am rusty is an understatement at this point. I feel more like I am starting over.....

So I have been working on shuffles, cuts etc the basics. Scared of double lifts which I was never good at anyhow :(

What is the best way to get in shape with where I was before? Just practice each basic over and over repeatedly? [/quote]
I had a similar experience after giving card magic a break for a while at one stage, and can identify with a lot of what you're describing.

What I found to be the most helpful was work through a course in card fundamentals. I used Roberto Giobbi's video series [url=https://www.robertogiobbi.com/site/product/card-college-12-personal-instruction-the-complete-course]Card College 1 & 2 Personal Instruction: The Complete Course[/url], which was fantastic - see a detailed review [url=http://www.playingcardforum.com/index.php?topic=12465]here[/url].

Not only did I get back into shape, but I also learned an enormous amount of things that I should have learned in the first place but never did. I highly recommend it.
Message: Posted by: mlippo (May 12, 2020 03:30AM)
[quote]On Mar 20, 2020, reno55 wrote:
I used to do cards quite awhile ago. To say I am rusty is an understatement at this point. I feel more like I am starting over.....

So I have been working on shuffles, cuts etc the basics. Scared of double lifts which I was never good at anyhow :(

What is the best way to get in shape with where I was before? Just practice each basic over and over repeatedly? [/quote]

My advice would be to purchase both Card College vol. 1 & 2. And I mean THE BOOKS!
Go through them in your own time. Don't rush. But, at the same time, don't wait to get to the end of volume 2 to read and study the wonderful theory chapters that Giobbi wrote for his course.
Those chapters need to be part of your thinking and your work from the beginning. And since you may lack some on-the-field experience (especially during this isolation period), something may not make sense to you right now. That's why you should go back to those 100 pages every now and then and re-read them. Each time you do so, another light will be switched on in your head!

Mark
Message: Posted by: Pepsi Twist (May 15, 2020 07:39AM)
I'd agree that Card College books 1&2 are pretty much the best way to seriously get learning all the stuff you might need, the only downside is that they're a bit of money, but worth it.

I'd advise also thinking about moves you actually need, a double turnover can achieve a whole lot, but you can also do just fine without one, there are lots of good false shuffles, but plenty also won't be useful in the circumstances you usually perform in.
Get a few tricks you want to perform, learn the moves for those (if required) and get out there!
Message: Posted by: DaveGripenwaldt (May 24, 2020 01:57PM)
All great suggestions. If you learn some self-working card effects, you can be performance ready even while you are working on the basics. If that idea appeals to you, I'd recommend Giobbi's "Card College Light", "Card College Lighter" and "Card College Lightest" All the tricks involve a minimum of slights and as a bonus, they are taught in the form of routines so you can learn the tricks to do stand alone or a complete 2 or 3 trick routine.
Message: Posted by: Daniel A. Day II (May 29, 2020 01:39PM)
I would recommend Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic. There is some card work included.

Joshua Jay's Amazing Book of Cards is focused on cards, but I haven't finished reading/studying it yet.

Regards,
Daniel
Message: Posted by: thegreatscungilli (May 31, 2020 09:14AM)
Daryl's "Card Reveals" and "Encyclopedia of Card Magic" Series are also good. Daryl does a nice job of showing each move in detail and also shows some practice exercises