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Topic: Luke Jermay at Edinburgh Fringe Festival
Message: Posted by: Svengali (Aug 20, 2004 10:29PM)
Did you see him? Please post a review!
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Aug 21, 2004 06:24AM)
Hi, I know someone who did, and he has encouraged me to get a ticket, so I feel I must be going up next week to see it. His chair prediction sounds excellent. I think I may "borrow" this.
Message: Posted by: Mesaboogie (Aug 21, 2004 07:35AM)
The reviews on the fringe website have been awful, which I find a little surprising, though I've never seen the other two magicians perform before.
Message: Posted by: templemagic (Aug 21, 2004 07:40AM)
Yeah, the show is really good. Luke shares the show with the hilarious Mandy Muden and the card-shark Jon "Jacky" McClements. I am a big fan of Luke's work. As for a review:

He burst onstage and immediately began a tossed deck routine. In the process of this he handed out five sealed envelopes to a member of the audience (it was me). Following the tossed deck, he did a short introduction to the show and to what he will be doing.

Next he did an incredible chair prediction, quite possibly the best I have seen. Next came PK touches ala Banachek. Luke closed the show with a twisted palm from seven deceptions. There was a nice balance of material, and the shows are well worth seeing if anyone is in Edinburgh over the next couple of weeks.

Hope this helps.

TM
Message: Posted by: Alexander Marsh (Aug 21, 2004 07:41AM)
Oh, I'm going to Edinburgh tomorrow. Is his show still running?
Message: Posted by: david_a_whitehead (Aug 21, 2004 08:06AM)
What makes his chair prediction "the best"?
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 21, 2004 08:23AM)
It's intriguing that the magician fans think the show is great but the fringe reviews poor. Can someone link the fringe reviews as I'd really like a lay person's view on his performance.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Dario_Bauer (Aug 21, 2004 09:23AM)
I saw the show yesterday, and it was very good indeed. He started with a tossed-out deck, then a blindfold routine, 'for Andruzzi', and the Chair prediction. On this occasion he never done PK Touches or 'Twisted Palm', so obviously he changes the show about quite a bit each day. I might get the chance nearer the end of the festival to go again. :) It runs until the 30th of August at 2.50 PM every day in the pleasance.

http://www.pleasance.co.uk/edin/prog/34/index.php

Contrary to what some on the Café have suggested, his performance was absolutely excellent. I went with a layperson. After the show he spent 20 minutes telling someone about it, and I had to remind him there were also two other performers in the show! He really connected well with the audience. There was one hilarious moment when he was getting volunteers to use in 'For Andruzzi' which could have gone very wrong, but he handled it perfectly and had everyone in stitches. :)

As for the effects, the Chair Prediction stood out because it appears he 'psychologically bullies' each spectator into a choice of chair and envelope which later match in a very visual and dramatic fashion. He even got a hit on asking the person in the blue chair to think of a colour (after they were already seated in chair). IMO this routine is pretty much perfect and he performed it wonderfully.

My personal favourite part of the show was 'For Andruzzi'. I was astonished at how effectively the suggestion worked. Some people have labeled his suggestion effects as bullying pretty blond chicks into agreeing with him when he nods his head. However, on this occasion at least, the pretty blond chick was visibly shocked and amazed at his pulse stopping, and it tripled along with the rest of the audience when he stopped a spectator's pulse too. Magnificent theatre and the effect is a masterpiece, seeing it has given me the confidence to try it myself, if nothing else the pretty blond chicks cant be bad. :P

The other two performers were solid magic acts too that had the laymen well entertained. As much as I dislike most magic, I did enjoyed both the other acts to a good extent. Jackie McClements done an entertaining card routine then sponge balls, which passed the time, and it turns out he is from clydebank, same as me, :) so it was good. Mandy Munden was very funny indeed. Come to think of it, I can hardly remember any of the effects she done (probably a good thing, :P) which shows the strong impact her personality had.

A great show all round and well worth the day trip to Edinburgh.
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 21, 2004 12:41PM)
Review from The Scotsman newspaper (17/8/04):

"UNLIKE any magic show you’ve ever seen," says the blurb, which is odd because it’s exactly like every magic show I’ve ever seen. That’s not really a criticism, as there will always be an audience for a traditional "how-do-they-do-that?" show. Maybe the twist is that there is no twist.

The three acts have their own specialities. Jackie McClements, who tells us he’s a teacher from Clydebank, does sleight-of-hand card tricks. They’re a little hard to see from the back of the room, but his mild manner is pleasing.

Mandy Muden is a mischievous flirt who likes to twist expectations and subvert the obvious tricks. She’s a good laugh too.

Nineteen-year-old mindreader Luke Jermay does a long routine which never quite works, but his use of suggestion with other audience members goes down well.

----------------------------------------------------

Audience reviews:
http://www.edfringe.com/reviews/read.html?id=MAGIE

The venue has an area for reviews from press and public. As of writing this, there is only one (or part of one) press review, and no audience reviews posted:
http://www.pleasance.co.uk/edin/prog/34/index.php

Overall, not encouraging. It's not much use if magicians enjoy the show and the (paying) public don't. Are the Brits less inclined to enjoy magic shows? This was discussed by Jon Allen this month:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=80443&forum=145
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 21, 2004 01:27PM)
This is the point I've been trying to make in previous posts about Luke Jermay - what do laymen think? I think a lot of magi are caught up in the originality and thinking behind his effects but what is the point if the audience reaction isn't really that great?

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Stephen Long (Aug 21, 2004 02:03PM)
I agree. He doesn't appear to be going down too well with non-magical folk at all. I suppose it just goes to show that you can have the cleanest and most baffling chair prediction ever, but if your audience don't take to you they won't give a dingo's kindneys.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 21, 2004 04:19PM)
"the last guy was a low rent Derren Brown but without any personality at all. That's not quite true, he was incredibly irritating."

Which sums up what I have said in other posts concerning the importance of personality and voice etc.

"This show is an insult to magicians. A five year old could have done better. I left before the end a total waste of money. Don't bother."

Nothing specific to Jermay but then he obviously wasn't good enough to impress that audience member.

"Jerry is nuts. We know that. But my question is... how can someone be such an idiot to put on such a lousy and ridiculous show! It hurts! I haven't seen so bad magic for a while. In each of the three styles of the three starring magicians I would say it will be hard to find someone worse. They are really terrible. Don't waste your money..."

Oh dear. Not very promising at all, is it? Kind of puts things into a completely different perspective.

I don't know the people who wrote these reviews but the important factor is that they are all people who paid money to see the show and were obviously unimpressed.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 21, 2004 04:42PM)
I'm only going on the teaching Dvd here but I believe Lukes methods are sound, I just think maybe if he was a bit more exciteable. I can see where some of the effects can fall down. Most of my enguagements are evening parties in peoples houses or small venues where small stuff works very well, I would imagaine that every thing would drop a grade if I were to perform in a large situation such as a concert hall. I don't think pulse stopping would work well some well some where like that where your two tiny figures on a stage .
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 21, 2004 04:52PM)
To an extent you have a point but I still say it's down to the performer - look how big David Berglas could make the pulse stop play. In fact look at how big Berglas could make lots of effects play.

The pulse stop is not a new effect - using suggestion within the routine is indeed new - and I'm fairly sure it plays well if pushed properly.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 21, 2004 04:58PM)
I'm curious, would any one have any recomendations as to how to improve a performance that is not quite hitting? is it a natural born talent to be able to entertain or can we find out what we do wrong and fix it.
My charactor usually plays on making out that everything has gone wrong and of course in the end I'm impressively on the mark or close, of course I choose which.
What do people feel would help Luke?
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 21, 2004 05:09PM)
On the other hand, Derren Brown's stage shows have been a big hit.

I think that in mentalism it is more than just the routines and the presentation. I don't agree that he should become 'more excitable' - I don't think that would fit his act. More exciting, yes - there was not much emotional feedback from him in response to his effects on the 'Skullduggery' DVD.

Just think about how profound his effects are - way beyond what might be considered conventional magic. This is serious stuff - and it's best done as such.

To make audience truly [b]believe[/b] this, you have to have the gravitas to pull it off. Sometimes this takes something that Luke doesn't have yet...[b]AGE[/b]! I just wonder whether somehow his youth makes some of his effects less believable. He's noticeably described in one of the press reports as '19-year-old Luke Jermay'. If this is the case, at least he can be reassured that he'll get there soon enough.

All in my very humble opinion, of course.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 21, 2004 05:10PM)
I saw the show and really it wasn't that bad. It went down pretty well with the audience on the day I saw it.

It is clear they are at the start of their careers. And it was an odd mix of acts.

Lukes twisted palm I was impressed with it was the most polished thing he did ad had a couple of very nice moments.

What it did need was audience interaction and build up of the effects. At least he is out there doing it.

And that is the only way to learn and make progress.

As for anyone going out there to borrow effects from Luke then you will never be any good.

Find your own material learn to pick out excellence in performing(not just in mentalism). A big part of being good is knowing what is good. Otherwise you'll just be crap..
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 21, 2004 05:23PM)
Sadly, perhaps you've hit the nail on the head. This is just somthign interesting that came to mind. I do a good deal of stage acting outside of mentalism, I do my own make up for my roal's, Considering I'm an artist I apply make up like I draw and paint, I exagurate the lines on my face but barely noticeably or not at all to an audience, one of the other girls noticed in the perfomance along with several others thought they had misjudged my age, due to this, I'm actually in my late twenties, Perhaps Luke could use some make up to age him ;)
Probably a silly idea but if max Maven get away with the make up so could he.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 21, 2004 05:41PM)
Character is a vital ingredient in a Mentalism act but that doesn't mean that you have to "play" a charecter - that is best left to performers who have acting experience and knowledge. Luke is a young guy - nothing wrong with that and he should maybe play on the fact more. I think any attempt to artficially age him would be laughable. What he needs is experience and a willingness to listen to constructive feedback. The only way to get the former is to keep on doing what he's doing. If he hasn't got the latter then he'll disappear up himself!

He's obviously an ambitious performer given his choice of material but he perhaps doesn't have the experience to carry it off well. Bear in mind that you only get one chance to entertain a group of people. It is rare to get the same audience twice.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 21, 2004 05:58PM)
In my case, My charactor is close to me. Being dyslecic I have a habit of unintensionally mixing things up any way so if my charactor seems this way it's not as bad if I hit close, and when I hit the mark people it's a knock out.
I was working with a marking systim not long ago and was testing it on a friend, To cut this short I lost my mark, I couldn't see it any whre in the spred, which wasn't great as there were 4 cards marked so I had to take a shot and accept that I was going to get it wrong and blame it on psychic powers being out of line or some such, I was flabbergasted when I actually picked the marked card out by pure chance!! And my friend was amazed I got his card also.
In real Life I appear confident, but underneath I'm double cheacking every thing and ready for when things go wrong, it's only fitting that my charactor is my underneath personality lol :)
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 21, 2004 06:01PM)
Performing is like learning to drive a car.

You have to learn the various levels until they are automatic before moving on to the next. First of all you have to learn the actual mechanics of the effects. Without that you have nothing that's the foundation. Then you have to be aware of your stance and presentation. How you handle the audience. Then some patter, then how to interact. Then you have to look at the structure of your show for maximum impact. Then eventually it hopefully comes together and you can forget everything so you can focus on the audience.

That takes a few years of regular performing plus life experience. And putting your neck on the line. Some people are natural some aren't. Either way its a skill that you have to pay to get. You have to ingnore feedback and advise because its you that's up there. Advice normally comes from those who haven't been through the above process. The only way to understand is to do it.

Working an audience is a knack that comes with doing it. Luke is doing it. At his age five years is a long time. The real question is will there be a market for mentalism over here in five years?
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 21, 2004 06:12PM)
Interestingly enough I was doing stage hypnosis for eight years and there wasn't really much call for as much skill with the audience as I have found there is in mentalim, when I started with mentalism there was a temptation to just hypnotise people and be done with it, my skill was in chooseing people who were suggestable rather then handeling those who were not.I still use a little hypnosis but no longer for a laugh.
To me hypnosis got very boreing, mainly because once I had the subjects doing htere thing I didn't have to do a lot aside keeping them getting into trouble.
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 21, 2004 07:55PM)
I suppose it's unusual for someone become so prominent at such a young age. Particularly with an area such as mentalism - which relies so much on experience of audience management. Using Shrink's analogy, better to learn to drive on the back roads first before hitting the highway! Luke has clearly has got a great deal of experience under his belt, but it all takes time to come together, especially with such an ambitious programme.

Perhaps he's is somewhat unfortunate to be in the glare of publicity in the magic community - where expectations of him are high. Having said that, he chose to do the Edinburgh fringe. Was this too ambitious a step?
Message: Posted by: malini (Aug 21, 2004 11:01PM)
"His chair prediction sounds excellent. I think I may "borrow" this."


Kennedy, you twit. You don't just "borrow" other people's routines.

Research all of the many chair predictions around (see Berglas, Maven and a-dozen others) and develop your own original stuff.


-malini.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 22, 2004 02:51AM)
I don't think it's a case of expectations being too high or even being in the spotlight at such a young age - there are many very successful actors and actresses at that age who can deliver flawless and compelling performances.

I think, simply, that it's the difference between what magicians/mentalists find personally entertaining as opposed to what sells for the lay audience. Luke is an amzing creative talent but he seems to lack performing experience. Time alone will tell if he improves with time and good luck to him.

I must say that on the DVD I found his voice and some of his mannerisms irritating and it's interesting that one lay reviewer described him as irritating so I think he has some work to do.

As for the Edinburgh Fringe being too ambitious - not at all. It's a wonderful opportunity to be crap and not stand out from the crowd. I've been out ofEdinburgh for 4 years now but I'm sure it hasn't changed - for every good show there are another 20 dire ones.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Colin (Aug 22, 2004 04:42AM)
Malini...I'll need to shake your hand some day.

Kindest regards to you.

Colin Mcleod
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 22, 2004 05:03AM)
I wouldn't say Luke was crap. When I was there the audience enjoyed the show. Their reactions were good.

I think its a great experience to have done the festival. It can only add to his development. Like I said there were some really nice moments I especially liked his twisted palm.

There was also a problem with hornets in the roof. A few bounced off my head as they were stunned in the dark and with the noise. One went down the back of my shirt but I got it out just in time before I got stung. Luke missed an opportunity to summon a plague I think..
Message: Posted by: Adam (Aug 22, 2004 05:29AM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-21 18:09, taliesin wrote:
To make audience truly [b]believe[/b] this, you have to have the gravitas to pull it off. Sometimes this takes something that Luke doesn't have yet...[b]AGE[/b]! I just wonder whether somehow his youth makes some of his effects less believable. He's noticeably described in one of the press reports as '19-year-old Luke Jermay'. If this is the case, at least he can be reassured that he'll get there soon enough.

All in my very humble opinion, of course.

[/quote]

Yes, spot on. But don't expect the mini-Derrens on this board who dote on Luke to make any effort to accept this.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 22, 2004 06:00AM)
I don't think age is that big a factor - for example I started doing psychic readinsg when I was 21 and whenever I did a psychic fair I was usually the busiest reader compared to men and women with tons more experience.

How old was Geller when he made it big?

I know many performers who started bending metal and doing psychic stuff in their teens.

Age is not as important as experience - a 50 year old may not necessarily have the same life experience as a 20 year old, it's all relative.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Adam (Aug 22, 2004 06:37AM)
That's interesting; it's counterintuitive but I won't argue with the facts. But Luke does neither readings nor metal bending in his act. Presenting yourself as a 'master of psychology' (or the like) does not ring true when you're a teenager, does it?
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 22, 2004 06:45AM)
I believe Luke does indeed do readings in his act. Maybe not in the act you saw but certainly I've heard reports of him using readings when he performed in London.

As for Spoon-bending, it was only an example. Regardless, the issue was about whether Mentalist performers IN GENERAL needed to be older to be believable, and I don't think it's necessarily the case. Cajones are needed quite often, and given what he performs we can take it for granted that he has them!

Does Luke claim to be a Master of Psychology? I hope not as he is certainly far too young to be convincing in that role. I thought he was just some young guy who could do cool stuff and that he doesn't make many claims either way?

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Adam (Aug 22, 2004 07:05AM)
[quote]
Does Luke claim to be a Master of Psychology? I hope not as he is certainly far too young to be convincing in that role. I thought he was just some young guy who could do cool stuff and that he doesn't make many claims either way?

[/quote]

Check out his website (esp. 'biography').
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 22, 2004 07:12AM)
Much as I hate it, I do believe that age appearance influences an audience. Banachek made that point in one of his manuscripts about another performer, pointing out that when a young person performs, an older guy wants to come away being able to explain how the performer did his stuff to his girlfriend so he doesn't feel stupid. In other words, the older guy feels intimidated/

On the other hand when the same couple go to see an older performer it feels OK to the guy that an older person should know more than him. While I believe this view can be transcended in such a way as Uri Geller and Banachek did, it still does seem to be a factor, sadly.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 22, 2004 07:27AM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-22 08:05, Adam wrote:
[quote]
Does Luke claim to be a Master of Psychology? I hope not as he is certainly far too young to be convincing in that role. I thought he was just some young guy who could do cool stuff and that he doesn't make many claims either way?

[/quote]

Check out his website (esp. 'biography').
[/quote]

Just read the biography bit. He doesn't exactly say he's a master of psychology. In fact he says he's a student of the human mind which, I think, is appropriate for his age. I think someone of Luke's age can show a lot of cool stuff under that banner.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 22, 2004 07:32AM)
I think age is an advantage sometimes because you are more skilled in life in general. Or at least that's the theory not always the case. There are certain processes and skills needed in order to work an audience whether it is mentalism stand up or anything. This takes time and study to master. However too many focus totally on the effects and never graduate much further. Therefore age is a factor.

Dare I say it "Hype" is a skill needed really to work an audience. There seems to be a little neurosis around that word in here at the moment. But anyone who made anything in show business knew how to hype the audience. That is a separate skill from just doing effects. Otherwise you are just doing conjuring tricks.
Message: Posted by: Adam (Aug 22, 2004 07:34AM)
Interspersing words such as 'real power'...'psychological techniques' (repeatedly)...'expert'... all give a certain impression. There's nothing wrong with it at all, as far as I can tell. I'm just suggesting that laymen find this difficult to take seriously (perhaps this accounts for the bad reviews?).

Why wasn't the Oracle in Matrix a teenager? Perhaps there's something about this that tells us what kind of people are seen (amongst the laity) as having 'heightened mental abilities'. I still can't explain Geller, though.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 22, 2004 07:38AM)
Geller is a master of hype.
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 22, 2004 08:52AM)
Although Geller was young when he first came to prominence, he was really a one-trick man, i.e., bending silverware. He presented this [b]absolutely[/b] straight. He couldn't (and didn't attempt) to explain why he could do these things - it was just some weird natural phenomenon.

He wasn't a 'master' or an expert at anything. It was more like he was inflicted with this 'gift'. There was no high-minded patter about his powers. He basically just described the process of the spoon bending.

I think that's why it worked for him at a young age. It was simple, and he just seemed to be a gifted person. Even now, I don't think most people would consider Geller's ability to be a magic act.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 22, 2004 09:10AM)
He played everyone like a fiddle---the media, the scientists. He even used his critics and the controversy to his advantage. He was never a magic act; he was much more than that.
Message: Posted by: Banachek (Aug 22, 2004 06:30PM)
I don't think the reviews mentioned on the site are truly a representation of paying laypeople. It sounded like they were magicians to me. One even mentions Sadowitz, the others also sounded like magicians talking.

Just my two cents.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 22, 2004 07:00PM)
That's true, Banachek. I had noticed that, but since I barely know of Sadowitz myself I hadn't given it much thought.

Personally I like Luke and believe he will get better and better. I believe in a little constructive criticism but not plain bashing for the heck of it.
Message: Posted by: Svengali (Aug 22, 2004 10:07PM)
Those "magicians" sounds like sour grapes to me....
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Aug 23, 2004 03:59AM)
Malini,

Thank you for the humour it was much appreciated, at least someone got it, took its time.

The advantage of Luke's routine is that it begins as a bank night effect, and then it turns out that he has predicted which spectator will sit where once ascending the stage.

It was really good stuff.

Kennedy
Message: Posted by: Adam (Aug 23, 2004 04:06AM)
Jerry Sadowitz had a television series on Channel 5 here in the UK and is not unknown to 'laypeople'. Also, being from Scotland (where - surprise! - the Edinburgh festival takes place) he is probably even better known there.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 23, 2004 04:50AM)
Jerry Sadowoitz is probably known best by magicians. He is a top card magician.

I don't think these reviews were the opinions of all the audience. The show went down well when I was there.
Message: Posted by: templemagic (Aug 23, 2004 06:11AM)
The reason I saw Luke's chair prediction as the best is because it has a twist at the end. He sets it up as one form of prediction (apparently realized by his ability to influence people), but then has an extra kicker because it's the chair prediction in the end.

I realize that makes no sense, but I have typed it quickly and it is great.

TM
Message: Posted by: Colin (Aug 23, 2004 06:14AM)
Jerry Sadowitz, whom I reckon is one of the most highly skilled magicians of our time, has put an excellent show together.

He knows what entertainment is, and having seen lay people go away day after day from the show talking about what they have just seen, I think they know what entertainment is too.

I have been invited along to the show on a number of occasions, and as far as Luke's act goes, the suggestions have always been successful, the climaxes always obtain gasps, and the conclusions gather huge rounds of applause.

The show has also had many reviews at the other end of the scale. I know for a fact it has received at least one 5-star review, and another 4-star. I will look into posting these later since some of you guys are so interested in criticizing fellow performers.

Best Wishes,

Colin Mcleod

P.S. Jerry Sadowitz is not from Scotland. He was, however, brought up here.
Message: Posted by: Svengali (Aug 23, 2004 06:17AM)
Please post those reviews Colin! Thanks!
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 23, 2004 07:08AM)
"I will look into posting these later since you some of you guys are so interested in criticizing fellow performers."

No, some of us are interested in getting a fair and balanced appraisal of his act free of hyperbole from his fans but also free of harsh criticism from those who may be jealous.

I trust Shrink's judgment as I know him personally, and I believe we have fairly similar taste - although he is perhaps more easily bored than I am - so I believe the show wasn't as bas as made out in these reviews.

If the reviews I read were by magicians - which is not impossible - then it doesn't really help us. The fact is, however, with so many things going on at the festival, I think it'd be hard for such a show to get an audience that didn't already have a vested interest in magic, so it's going to be tough to get a decent opinion.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 23, 2004 09:02AM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-23 07:14, Colin wrote:
I will look into posting these later since you some of you guys are so interested in criticizing fellow performers.
[/quote]

I don't think there has been any criticism at all in this discussion. Some of the negative reviews of Luke's show have provoked a perfectly reasonable discussion - theorizing about the difficulties of mentalism for younger performers.

I'm sure everyone would be delighted to read some positive reviews and discuss those as well.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 23, 2004 11:31AM)
The negatives were not so much in this discussion. I've always felt that the Café is about Magicians helping magicians, or mentalists in this case, as it says at the top of the page. So helpful, well-balanced criticism I don't mind. I'm here to help and be helped.

So far I would say that most of the debates have been fair jealousy, and misplaced emotions shouldn't come in to these discussions, in my opinion.
Message: Posted by: Colin (Aug 24, 2004 05:27PM)
From the Evening News tonight...

"The Magic Zone

"Incredible three for one show will kill you...literally


"The Magic Zone, ****
"The Pleasance

"THERE’S three for the price of one with The Magic Zone.

"Jackie McClements warms up the audience with a nice line in patter, and an equally nice line in card tricks.

"Mandy Muden creates a delightful counterpoint, playing on her femininity for laughs, and her sleight-of-hand skills for gasps of astonishment.

"You just never know what’s going to happen next when Muden is on stage, but you can be certain it will border on the chaotic.

"Between them, McClements and Muden have more than enough skill to keep the magic fans - and families - happy. The third act, however, is extraordinary.

"Luke Jermay kills the audience - literally.

"Just for starters, Jermay casually tosses out a deck of cards into the crowd. Several random members of the audience peek into the deck and select one card, which they keep in mind.

"Without again touching the cards, the young Jermay names each of the cards the individuals are merely thinking of. Two of the spectators were thinking of the same card, yet Jermay got that, too.

"There are no magic boxes, no sleight of hand. Just think of a card, and he’ll tell you what it is.

"He unfailingly predicts what chairs certain members of the audience will select, and makes the lines on the palm of a spectator’s hand swirl and change shape.

"Spooky stuff.

"However, his greatest feat is when he slows, then stops his pulse. He then does the same with the audience, with clutches of astonished individuals throughout the venue reporting that the pulse of the person sitting next to them has also stopped. Yet Jermay is nowhere near them at the time.

"This stuff has to be experienced to be believed. Grab a ticket to this show, and see dead people."

Best Wishes,

Colin Mcleod
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 24, 2004 05:44PM)
I like to hear of other young mentalists, especially a guy who seems as nice as Luke doing well. It always saddens me when I hear things not going well for them, and him.

H.W
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 24, 2004 05:57PM)
The Evening News review - who was it by? I know the Café's very own Drew MacAdam has a connection with either that paper or the Scotsman. A great review nonetheless, but the use of "peek" and "deck" make me wonder if it's by someone versed in our art.

Not so much the "peek" part I suppose, as I can't think of another term to use to describe that action, but certainly the term "deck" is more often than not used by magicians. Laypeople usually say "pack".

Please note, it's a great review and I'm happy for all concerned, but I really want to hear what some lay people think as that's what this game is all about.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 24, 2004 06:11PM)
David, I don't think you will find any lay people in here lad. :) You need to go see the show in order for that!

I can tell you it did go down well with the audience.

:)
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 24, 2004 06:28PM)
>David: I don't think you will find any lay people in >here lad

Didn't say you would, but it is possible to find a lay review that counts. At the moment we are discounting negative reviews because it looks like they were written by magicians. So why should a positive review by a magician be given any more credence, especially if the magician is a fan?

I know Colin is a massive fan of Luke's and that he knows Drew. I know Drew either writes for or has a mate who writes for the Evening News/Scotsman, so maybe I'm jumping to conclusions.

>I can tell you it did go down well with the >audience.

Cool, and you know I trust your judgment. However, isn't it likely the audience was predominantly magicians? I recall Max Maven doing the festival a few years ago, and I understand he was lucky if he got six people in his show! And they'd all be magicians! That's the problem with the festival - so many things on so anything like magic is likely to appeal mostly to those with a vested interest.

I know I'm going on about this too much, and I might be coming across as a bit negative, but I really want a few independent lay person views on his performance and they don't seem easy to come by. Let's face it, what you or I or every other member of this board thinks doesn't really matter - it's what the paying customer thinks that matters. Yes, you have paid to see his show, but you know what I mean. A magician cannot live by magician audiences alone!

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 24, 2004 07:29PM)
David I can assure you there were very little magicians in the audience that day (and I don't mean there was midget magicians). They were lay public, and they enjoyed the show.

When you think about it, why should a lay person review a show? Anyone who reviews anything usually have an emotional or financial investment in doing so. Lay people just move on to the next show. Which is why the only real way for you to get your answer is actually to attend a show!

My opinion is that there are some really strong parts to the show and some not so strong parts. It's an odd mix of acts, but I enjoyed it.
Message: Posted by: Banachek (Aug 24, 2004 08:50PM)
Shrink, I would actually consider a reporter's viewpoint from a layperson's point of view. I am sure there are boards where people also post (I know I have found reviews of my performances there by laypeople). Also I would consider comments from non-magicians as a layperson's point of view.

Magicians look at these performances from a very different point of view. We all have egos or we would not be in this business, and we all think our idea is the best one and our presentation is the best one. As a result we tend to be overly critical from our point of view on the magic mountain we stand upon. Our point of view is not necessarily the point of view of the paying public and, as is so often the case, very different.

This is exactly why it is good to get the advice of a someone not in our profession when looking for a director. A perfect example of our point of view being different is David Blaine. I hear so many magicians saying his technique is no good and on and on and criticizing him. Yet he is the most talked about and best known magician out there with the laypeople. They could not care if the trick he is doing has been around for centuries. He hits home with the lay home viewers.

It is amazing when working with TV producers, how different and fresh their vision can be from the ones we who are immersed and drowning in the magic world around us have. I think this is why many are asking for non-magician reviews, simply because this type of review is unbiased and has no agenda and no ego involved to slant it.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 25, 2004 01:44AM)
>David, I can assure you there were very little >magicians in the audience that day.

Okay, how do you know and how many people were in the audience? I'm genuinely curious. How big a venue was it, how full was it?

>They were lay public, and they enjoyed the show.

Good. Can you elaborate a teensy bit on what went well and what didn't go so well? How did they react, etc.?

>When you think about it, why should a lay person >review a show?

As Banachek says, I would count a newspaper review as a lay review IF the reviewer is not connected to a magician as I suspect the Evening News guy is. And review isn't really what I'm after - honest opinion from lay people.

>Lay people just move on to the next show.

True to an extent but the Internet has opened up doors previously closed and everyone is free to express their opinion somewhere. Seeing that there was a site for such reviews made me think that surely one lay person could have put their thoughts down.

>Which is why the only real way for you to get your >answer is actually to attend a show!

Well, if someone wants to pay my fair from Seville airport I'll more than happily attend! :).

We've heard so much from people who think Luke is the best thing ever and people who have doubts about his ability. The people who think he's the best thing ever tend to suggest that the other crowd are jealous.

I'm not jealous. I just didn't like his personality on the DVD and thought he made some fundamental errors. I accept the DVD was two years ago and that he has grown as a performer since then, so I'm now looking for independent reviews to see how he has progressed. More importantly, to see how his effects actually go down with a lay audience as there has also been quite a bit of discussion concerning that.

I'm extremely intrigued that you felt the twisted palm was a highlight of the show for example. I've put myself into laymen's shoes to imagine what they would think on seeing such an effect.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 25, 2004 03:11AM)
Of course, laymen review shows. You wouldn't say that only actors would write online theatre reviews.

I think it's likely that people tend to review when it's a case of love or hate: either to warn people off wasting money on a poor show, or to get other people to go and see a good show.

You write a review when you feel strongly about what you've seen. That's why reviews are likely to be so polarized.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 25, 2004 04:35AM)
David, more or less all of Luke's material went down well with the audience. I like Twisted Palm because it was a nice piece of theatre. It worked really well.

PK touches was another nice routine. The only weak part of the set for me was the pulse stop. Although it still got gasps from the audience and "how the **** did he do that". It's just my opinion that it needed a little more build up. But I also believe that some of the suggestion effects vary from audience to audience.

The day I was there it was more of a family audience. Apparently each day has fluctuated between 30 and 100 people attending. If anyone knows anything about the festival that is a really good turnover of people for unknown acts.

So I would say they are doing really well. I can assure the Twisted Palm went down a treat live.

I am still amazed as to how strong a reaction a simple tossed-out deck gets.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 25, 2004 05:15AM)
Great info, Shrink, much appreciated.

Yeah, those figures are great for a festival show.

I'm totally surprised at Twisted Palm going down better than the pulse stop. I've said before that IMHO the average audience member would just put it down to hypnosis, and since much more interesting things can be done with hypnosis, I'm not sure they'd think it all that great an effect. Whereas with pulse stopping, there is just no explanation for it - particularly stopping an audience member's pulse.

Glad you are impressed by the tossed-out deck. There IS a reason that the classics become classics, and it's amazing how many of us overlook them until we see them done.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 25, 2004 07:21AM)
I said the palm twister went down better than the pulse stop for me personally. It was just a better piece with use of lights, etc., and a good way to end. Also it was a family audience that day which perhaps wasn't the best for that effect. Were a lot of kids in the audience. Apparently the audience changes from day to day.
Message: Posted by: kinesis (Aug 25, 2004 08:52AM)
I saw a pre-festival performance. Pulse Stop was well received. The Chairs was fantastic and caught me totally off-guard. I loved it. I wish he had done PK Touches but never mind.

His thrown-out deck at the very start really set the scene and he commanded his audience very well throughout. He got a tough cookie for the palm twister but held his own.

Overall the audience responded very well to Luke's performance. Me? I loved every minute.

[img]http://www.derekheron.com/pics/derekluk.jpg[/img]
Message: Posted by: Andy Leviss (Aug 26, 2004 12:48AM)
Unless I missed it, nobody posted regarding the question of who wrote that long review of the show that Colin posted. I can confirm that it is by our own Drew McAdam. FWIW.
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 26, 2004 05:25AM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-26 01:48, Andy Leviss wrote:
Unless I missed it, nobody posted regarding the question of who wrote that long review of the show that Colin posted. I can confirm that it is by our own Drew McAdam. FWIW.
[/quote]

Thanks for the confirmation. No offence to Drew but as far as I'm concerned since he's obviously a fan and a mentalist his review holds as much weight as the severely negative ones posted earlier and discounted because they were probably written by jealous magicians.

The search for an independent lay review continues!

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: adamjames (Aug 26, 2004 01:38PM)
Well, I saw this show at Edinburgh, and I went with five laypeople. I was hoping it would be good, as I had suggested seeing it, but the day I went it didn't go down well with anyone---magicians or laymen.

Mandy Muden did go down quite well (and got big cheers at the end), but the first fellow and Jermay seemed to stumble through their acts. Certainly no one sitting near me (and I assume they were all laypeople since they were all impressed with Muden's card-stab) was impressed by Jermay.

I heard many people discussing how he was doing his tricks while he was doing them, and they were correct in their guesses. This was mainly because of the way he conducted himself while blindfolded and an incorrect guess of an audience member's object which looked like something other than what it was.

Luke just doesn't have the charisma or experience. And that is not only my opinion. Many people were discussing this in the Pleasance Courtyard afterwards, and they weren't all magicians.

The show fell flat on the day I saw it.

I hadn't read the reviews on the site before I went to the show, but now I have read them, I can only agree with them.

Adam
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 26, 2004 04:27PM)
Chances are that I'm not going to get to see that show. I have performed in plays on stage for a few runs, a good many were comedies. I have noted that some nights the audience were laughing till there sides split and other nights they seemed dead. I'm not sure if crowd or audience mentality comes into this.

Perhaps the shows have good nights and bad nights. Of course, I'm no expert in this.

Just a thought.

H.W
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 26, 2004 04:33PM)
It's a grey area. There are some performers - and Pat Page is one of them IIRC - who insist that there is no such thing as a bad audience.

I think if you have the charisma and experience you should be able to turn an audience around. A play is a different event to an "act" mind you - there are many more variables involved in a play.

I would think a lot of Festival shows go through phases. It's a great place to be "bad" and that's something all of us need in order to get experience. However, for people to be talking about how he was doing things whilst he was performing indicates a little bit more than just a bad night.

That said, it's obviously not been the case at every performance.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 26, 2004 04:45PM)
I can't offer an opinion on that. I've never performed a large venue as a mentalist, as an actor I have and if you count weddings and events like this, etc., I have as a hypnotist.

I wonder if Luke ever sits in the dressing room or back stage and thinks, "How can I increase audience response?"

It's books on these subject I would like to read rather than just on effects.

It's easy to get laughs as a stage hypnotist, but not so easy to get the same attentive response as a mentalist I find.

H.W
Message: Posted by: Colin (Aug 26, 2004 05:07PM)
Luke has sat and talked me through every part of his current 25 minute act.

He has explained why he does what he does, why he does things when he does, where the inspiration came from for such things---the list goes on!

Needless to say, the man has considered every small factor of his act and modified it to gain maximum impact from the environment he has been put in. Every time I have seen the show, it has all worked incredibly well.

He is doing a well-varied assortment of routines, and even chops and changes depending on the audience which is in. As the numbers are never guaranteed, nor the age of the audience, he has shown the capacity to modify his character to win over the audience, and at the end of the day everyone has fun! That is what it is all about.

Colin
(The massive fan of Luke's)
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 26, 2004 05:16PM)
I am sure that Luke has thought very carefully about everything he does, and I don't think anyone disputes that for a second. However, if Adamjames is to be believed, having audience members discuss methods is a fairly serious breach for any kind of magical entertainer.

Besides, thinking things through is one thing - putting it into practice and actually entertaining people is another thing and no matter what you have studied, no matter how much you have thought things through, there will be something to learn when you get on that stage and do your act.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 26, 2004 05:42PM)
I would be interested in knowing some back story on Luke---how did he get to be such a celebrity in mentalist circles?

I think his written work is fabulous, but still I wonder how it started. I never buy it when people say they have been doing it since they were five. Though they may have been I don't think that makes any difference.

If any one knows how Luke got his big start, I'd be interested to hear.

H.W
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 26, 2004 06:06PM)
There is definitely a gap in the market for such a book. Mentalists would benefit from learning presentation skills aimed at maximization. Performing should be much more than effects. In fact the effects should only be part of the process.

The biggest let down from most mentalists is not understanding about how to control mental states. Also skilled use of language. I haven't seen many who have these abilities or skills with the exception of Derren Brown.

[quote]
On 2004-08-26 17:45, Hypnotic Winter wrote:

I can't offer an opinion on that, I've never performed a large venue as a mentalist, as an actor I have and if you count weddings and events like this etc I have as a hypnotist.

I wonder if Luke ever sits in the dressing room or back stage and thinks,"how can I increase audience response".

It's books on these subject I would like to read rather then just on effects.

It's easy to get laughs as a stage hypnotist but not so easy to get the same attentive responce as a mentalist I find.

H.W
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: Richard Evans (Aug 26, 2004 07:43PM)
You can't get away with having a dull personality as a mentalist because 90%+ of the performance is down to presentation and acting.

I agree entirely with Shrink about the use of language and controlling mental states, but these are relatively new concepts. The 'old' mentalists (Berglas, Canasta, Dunninger) oozed charisma and had great presence. They were also a lot older (coming back to a previous point).

I'm sticking my neck out here, but I bet a lot of these guys spent their formative years in training on the stage in the '30s and '40s and before. They learned their stagecraft from the theatre.

Maybe acting classes are a must in mentalism?
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 27, 2004 02:52AM)
There are teachers all around us...great performers from all types of acts, comedians, motivational speakers, presenters. I have even started to watch the God channel on cable TV! Some of those evangalists know how to work a crowd!
Message: Posted by: bobser (Aug 27, 2004 06:45AM)
Just a note on the good audience/bad audience thing.
After having performed literally thousands of gigs as an MC, stand-up,musician, and magic/mentallism I absolutely KNOW that there 'IS' such a thing as a 'bad audience', and whenever I hear people talk about there being no such thing I cringe with embarrassment for them. The saying: "there's no such thing as a bad audience" can only be used by complete and absolute twits who for some strange reason seem to enjoy using it to chastise those whom they consider to be lesser individuals than they. They should be kicked hard on the shins and booed loudly!
Message: Posted by: David Numen (Aug 27, 2004 07:39AM)
Having seen how bad British audiences are when watching acts on the Costa Del Sol, I would agree with Bobser that you CAN have a bad audience.

That said, the mighty Pat Page - a magician who I have a great deal of respect for - would categorically say there is no such thing as a bad audience.

I don't have the experience as a performer to say which side of the fence I am on - I still think a charismatic and powerful personality can crack the tougher eggs but I'm sure even the greats had their bad days. I'm sure it's all in the management of the situation.

Regards,

David.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 27, 2004 08:04AM)
All audiences are good as long as I get paid and have a getaway car ready turning over at the back door!

A tip I learned the hard way never do Senior Military Balls in the UK. They are a no go area...
Message: Posted by: adamjames (Aug 27, 2004 11:54AM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-26 18:16, bartlewizard wrote:
However, if Adamjames is to be believed, having audience members discuss methods is a fairly serious breach for any kind of magical entertainer.
[/quote]


I'm just reporting what happened at the particular show I was at. It wasn't so much guessing what he was doing, as REALISING what he was doing...the methods were obvious by his presentation, to be honest. It was a shame...I had looked forward to this show.

If Luke did indeed change his show around, that could explain why some liked it and some didn't...they would have seen different things.


Adam
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Aug 27, 2004 12:16PM)
I have never had bad responses yet but I believe this is mainly due to the setting in which I perform and I try to get to know my audience before hand as well as during. But this wuld all be changed in a large cold venue. As a hypnotist I put myself in the state those I'm working with are, trouble is that it means if thing were not going well I would know instantly and would find it difficult to ignor.
When people meet me before hand they usually see I'm a nice person who's simply here to entertain them and mabe make a friend or two, when I go into my presentation I get a very nice responce and usually end up booked to be the entertainment and many more parties parties, I have never advertised.
I feel my not walking out on stage cold makes a huge differance.
H.W
Message: Posted by: bevbevvybev (Aug 27, 2004 12:36PM)
I would never get near a Senior Military's Balls personally...
Message: Posted by: ESP Guy (Aug 27, 2004 12:45PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-22 08:34, Adam wrote:
Why wasn't the Oracle in Matrix a teenager? Perhaps there's something about this that tells us what kind of people are seen (amongst the laity) as having 'heightened mental abilities'. I still can't explain Geller, though.
[/quote]

With Geller early on, there was a sense of innocence. A certain, naivete. He was as amazed and as excited when something happened as the people viewing his feats. He was mentalism's equivalent of Doug Henning.

Thom
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Aug 27, 2004 12:57PM)
Just returned from the festival and saw Luke's show and he blew me away, his humour, mannorisms and overall stage presence is fantastic, much better than when I saw him in the past.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 27, 2004 01:15PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-27 13:36, bevbevvybev wrote:
I would never get near a Senior Military's Balls personally...
[/quote]

Well I tried but my kick missed..

Honestly it ended up with a pile up on stage!

[quote]
On 2004-08-27 12:54, adamjames wrote:
[quote]
On 2004-08-26 18:16, bartlewizard wrote:
However, if Adamjames is to be believed, having audience members discuss methods is a fairly serious breach for any kind of magical entertainer.
[/quote]


I'm just reporting what happened at the particular show I was at. It wasn't so much guessing what he was doing, as REALISING what he was doing...the methods were obvious by his presentation, to be honest. It was a shame...I had looked forward to this show.

If Luke did indeed change his show around, that could explain why some liked it and some didn't...they would have seen different things.


Adam




[/quote]

Luke has done a show everyday for nearly a month. I reckon on some days he is tying out new material. Perhaps that's why you got an off day. Wouldn't be suprised if it was one of the first times he did those effects.

Funnily enough the day I went it was Mandy that fell flat and was experiencing lack of audience response due to her timing being a bit off. I guess a month is a long time. I am sure all three of them have learned a lot from this experience. What a great opportunity. Jackie Clements went down well that day to..
Message: Posted by: bobser (Aug 27, 2004 02:51PM)
For what it's worth Stuart & Barry from the channel 4 show: 'Magick' were offered one of the spots on the Luke/Mandy/Jackie slot in Edinburgh but couldn't make it. They are presently doing stand-up slots ( next one in Bournmouth on 29th August)and having seen the show I can tell you it's hilarios.
They actually do mobile phone from stomach 'live' and it has the audience in fits!
Message: Posted by: enriqueenriquez (Aug 27, 2004 07:08PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-27 13:45, ESP Guy wrote:
[quote]
On 2004-08-22 08:34, Adam wrote:
Why wasn't the Oracle in Matrix a teenager? Perhaps there's something about this that tells us what kind of people are seen (amongst the laity) as having 'heightened mental abilities'. I still can't explain Geller, though.
[/quote]

With Geller early on, there was a sense of innocence. A certain, naivete. He was as amazed and as excited when something happened as the people viewing his feats. He was mentalism's equivalent of Doug Henning.

Thom
[/quote]

I guess the point is that, if you are young, you could have power, but not control.
Message: Posted by: salsa_dancer (Aug 29, 2004 10:13PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-27 20:08, enriqueenriquez wrote:

I guess the point is that, if you are young, you could have power, but not control.
[/quote]

Exactly! Look at Anakin Skywalker, he was pod racing at a very early age. Oh wait a minute that isn't real life is it? ;)
Message: Posted by: Andy Leviss (Aug 30, 2004 01:35AM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-26 19:06, shrink wrote:
There is definitely a gap in the market for such a book. Mentalists would benefit from learning presentation skills aimed at maximization. Performing should be much more than effects. In fact the effects should only be part of the process. [/quote]

I hope you'll forgive the tangent here, but I wanted to point out that there already is such a book. It's by Ken Weber, it's called [i]Maximum Entertainment[/i], and it's available from most dealers. Ken performed professionally for 15-20 years, and went to school for theatre, so he knows what he's talking about.

At Magic Live last week, he sold out of every copy he brought with him, and every time we were hanging out, people were coming up to him who already owned it and were saying it was the best book in magic they'd ever purchased. I kid you not, I even saw people buying copies to give to friends as gifts when their friends weren't willing to buy it for themselves.

For full disclosure, Ken is somebody I'm honored to consider a friend, but I'd say the same thing regardless of whether I knew him or not. As a matter of fact, I bought the book and was recommending it when I'd only met Ken once or twice and was really only a passing acquaintance.
Message: Posted by: Colin (Aug 31, 2004 11:18AM)
Just thought I'd share this as I finally managed to track it down. It's from the Three Week review...

The Magic Zone
Mary Tobin Presents
Magic is a risky business. Either you have that special gift or you don't. The Magic Zone presents three very different magicians; one who kinda has it, one who doesn't, and the last who definitely does. Jackie McClements, a Glaswegian schoolteacher by trade but a magician at heart, captures the audience's attention with age-old card tricks, displaying a talent for misdirection and slight of hand. Mandy Muden's performance though is likely to leave you wondering if you saw any magic at all. Her outrageous flirting and sexual innuendos fall flat, and bring the tone down a notch. It is nineteen-year-old Luke Jermay who steals the show, and while he claims not to be a mind reader, his ability to manipulate a situation and the audience, will leave you flabbergasted. All-in-all there's much skill, comedy and charm here.

...well call me 'mental' but I think Luke done good?

Colin
Message: Posted by: adamjames (Aug 31, 2004 11:48AM)
This is from The Scotsman newspaper:

The three acts have their own specialities. Jackie McClements, who tells us he’s a teacher from Clydebank, does sleight-of-hand card tricks. They’re a little hard to see from the back of the room, but his mild manner is pleasing.

Mandy Muden is a mischievous flirt who likes to twist expectations and subvert the obvious tricks. She’s a good laugh too.

Nineteen-year-old mindreader Luke Jermay does a long routine which never quite works, but his use of suggestion with other audience members goes down well.
Message: Posted by: shrink (Aug 31, 2004 01:05PM)
I reckon that's a good result both reviews. Keeping in mind the lenght of the run and the stage where Luke is at right now.

Reviwes are just someones views frozen in time
Things move on and develope.

A bit like this forum :)We sometimes get to serious on here.
Message: Posted by: Colin (Sep 12, 2004 08:07AM)
Hey all,

Had a few people e-mail me over this matter still asking if I knew of any other reviews, so to save time, and incase anyone else would like to read them, I have these as well.

Hope those who e-mailed me aren't offended, just thought this way it would benefit everyone.

Best Wishes,
Colin


“Luke Jermay reads minds. A mix of autosuggestion and
interpreting body language is how he says it is done.
But his amazing capacity to tell what members of the
audience were thinking had me gasping.”

The Razz Live Festival Reviews

"Luke Jermay with his Derren Brown style mind control
magic. This saves the show and is unlike anything you
have seen before. The man manages not only to
subconsciously influence people’s decision making, but
he also stops someone’s pulse! (No, they don’t die)"

Forth One
Message: Posted by: seanadl (Sep 12, 2004 01:50PM)
Luke jermay also doesn't answer emails
Message: Posted by: salsa_dancer (Sep 12, 2004 06:16PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-12 14:50, seanadl wrote:
Luke jermay also doesn't answer emails
[/quote]

Yes he does.
Message: Posted by: seanadl (Sep 12, 2004 06:28PM)
I should rephrase, Luke Jermay doesn't answer my emails. Great performer, not so great at following up purchases made by customers.
Message: Posted by: cheesewrestler (Sep 13, 2004 04:26PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-27 09:04, shrink wrote:
A tip I learned the hard way never do Senior Military Balls in the UK. They are a no go area...
[/quote]

What's that? I'm picturing a roomful of retired colonels & their Better Halves ... seems like a comedy skit waiting to happen ...
Message: Posted by: freeflyphil (Sep 18, 2004 01:21PM)
I went to see the show and enjoyed it. However as a beginner (been into magis only for 2.5 months)I was dissapointed that I was able to guess a lot of the methods of a pro. Also Luke attempted the stopped pulse routine but no one who came up on stage knew how to find his pulse. I would of thought it was obvious one should ask for anyone who was sure they could do this, for example someone with medical training. All luke did was ask if anyone had ever found their pulse, that's asking for trouble in my opinion and that's what he got. Still that doesn't mean there wasnt some strong stuff. I do wish he qouldnt quote Banacheck verbatim though.There are lots of ways to same the same thing without saying the same thing.
Message: Posted by: BullzEyE (Sep 18, 2004 03:29PM)
Ive heard a lot about this guy and that he was pretty good. I enjoyed his routines
Message: Posted by: bobser (Sep 19, 2004 06:12PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-18 14:21, freeflyphil wrote:
I went to see the show and enjoyed it. However as a beginner (been into magis only for 2.5 months)I was dissapointed that I was able to guess a lot of the methods of a pro.
[/quote]
Wow, he must have been having a really really bad day!!!!!!
Message: Posted by: scott b. (Sep 19, 2004 06:34PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-18 14:21, freeflyphil wrote:
I went to see the show and enjoyed it. However as a beginner (been into magis only for 2.5 months)I was dissapointed that I was able to guess a lot of the methods of a pro. [/quote]

I find that one just slightly hard to believe. It could have happened, but I'm just a bit of a skeptic.
Message: Posted by: freeflyphil (Sep 19, 2004 08:27PM)
Well I'm not aloud to discuss methods here. But I think most people for example know how to stop their pulses, am I wrong?
Message: Posted by: salsa_dancer (Sep 20, 2004 04:27AM)
Yes there are many methods used to stop your pulse. Luke does it without any gimmicks though.
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Sep 20, 2004 11:35AM)
I've never met anyone who knew how to stop their pulse with out being dead.

H.W
Message: Posted by: hmk (Sep 20, 2004 01:36PM)
Have not seen him on the Café for a while now but paul alberstadt has a nice routine, 'in a heartbeat' that is worth checking out for those interested in pulse stopping.
best wishes,
hmk
Message: Posted by: ScottLeavitt (Sep 20, 2004 08:34PM)
Just a hunch...but...he's out there working...he comes up with original matieral and ideas...he's willing to take chances in his material...he's young and has years ahead of him to develop his own material. Gut tells me (not based upon anything but that) that his presentation skills will improve over time, and we'll eventually see great things from him.

...again, just a hunch...
Message: Posted by: freeflyphil (Sep 21, 2004 11:07AM)
I agree with that Scott.
Salsa dancer, if Luke has a different method of (appearing to , sorry hypnotic Writer) stop his pulse than the one described in Gray's Book of Anatomy then I congratulate him on it. It could be very usefl for impromptu perfomers. But from the audiences perspective, at a staged show, I don't see why it would make any difference.
Message: Posted by: salsa_dancer (Sep 21, 2004 11:24AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-21 12:07, freeflyphil wrote:
I agree with that Scott.
Salsa dancer, if Luke has a different method of (appearing to , sorry hypnotic Writer) stop his pulse than the one described in Gray's Book of Anatomy then I congratulate him on it. It could be very usefl for impromptu perfomers. But from the audiences perspective, at a staged show, I don't see why it would make any difference.
[/quote]

Luke's method is in his book 7 Deceptions.
Message: Posted by: Stephen Long (Sep 21, 2004 12:07PM)
Also, Luke is the first performer to stop the pulse of an audience member as well as his own, is he not?
The 'traditional' method could certainly not accomplish this effect.
(Well, it could, but you'd need some [i]very[/i] heavy misdirection... :lol:)
Message: Posted by: Jonathan (Sep 21, 2004 03:33PM)
Did anyone else see David Blaine stop his own pulse on Last Call?

I must admit that I've never seen a mentalism show that I liked. Now, technically there are some people who do things I just can't figure out (Derren Brown or any other edited T.V. special), but there's always a certain flavor to mentalists that I just don't like. I'm a performer first and a mentalist second, I also do comedy, dance, acting, and music shows. It's like mentalism shows throw out everything that every other performing art thrives on.

I'm right now putting together a stage show that should be quite different and I am very anxious to see what happens. As far as the effects, there's not much that's new, but the presentation and the overall feel should be much different. Will it work? I hope so!

One big thing about magic and mentalism is the ego that Banachek pointed out. In my experience it seems most magicians/mentalists seem to be drawn toward the art because of a social inability. While it may help us get attention from people that we would never go up and talk to, it doesn't work on stage. Performers have to understand an audience and be able to connect with them.

That ego seems to come from insecurity and magic/mentalism might be used to fill that insecurity to allow for an ego. That very same ego comes across to audiences big time and, in my experience, creates a competition and the audience tries to figure it out to not allow the magician/mentalist to "best" them. If done right, the audience should fall in love with the performer and WANT them to succeed and do something magical. This comes with a certain humility. Richard Osterlind is amazing at this! I've learned a lot by watching his personality and performance. He's just a guy you want to love and want to succeed.

What I'm struggling with now is how to keep that humility while being a good showman. Most in our profession seem to lack both.

Jonathan Grant
Message: Posted by: freeflyphil (Sep 22, 2004 03:59PM)
Jonathan , your show sounds intriguing please keep uus informed(im sure you will). Stephen you are right the traditional method would not achieve the effect you described. So I guess Im going to have to order Lukes book, I preusme you reccomend it? Or is the DVD better? Anyone got both?
Message: Posted by: Hypnotic Winter (Sep 22, 2004 04:09PM)
Bravo Jonathan, Really enjoyed reading your post and totally agree with it.

H.W
Message: Posted by: enriqueenriquez (Sep 22, 2004 05:18PM)
Great post Jonathan!

I’m also intrigued by your new show.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan (Sep 22, 2004 07:50PM)
Thanks guys. It will be a while before it happens (a year?). I'll try to post the reactions at the appropriate time. I must admit I'm nervous about it, but also excited! I'm trying to put the emotion, power, and showmanship back(?) into mentalism. Will it work? I'm putting my neck on the line to find out!

Jonathan Grant
Message: Posted by: Ken Dyne (Sep 23, 2004 06:08AM)
I have both DVD and book, I would say it is difficult to decide between the two. For me the motivation for producing the DVD seems to have been that people didn't really think that the ideas and routines in 7 Deceptions actuially work. They do,. However to see luke perform his routines with his timing and things is very ncie indeed.

Granted the production quality of the DVD is not great but the effects within are really great stuff, and usable too.

Kind thoughts,
Kennedy