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Topic: How would you complete this sentence?
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Sep 27, 2004 08:56PM)
How would you complete this sentence?

[b]I am one of the more expensive children's entertainers, but... [/b]

Oh, make it two or three sentences if you wish.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Sep 27, 2004 09:10PM)
Don't like the word BUT

Andy, your a great Magician BUT

Andy, your Yellow outfit looks great BUT

Andy, your one of the more Expensive Magicains BUT

Andy Walker is one of the more expensive children's entertainers, however, his fee is in line for the quality of show your buying.
Message: Posted by: Magic.J.Manuel (Sep 27, 2004 09:33PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-27 21:56, Andy Walker wrote:
How would you complete this sentence?

[b]I am one of the more expensive children¡¦s entertainers, but... [/b]

Oh, make it two or three sentences if you wish.

[/quote]

My goal is to finish it with...

but my schedule is full!
Message: Posted by: Starrpower (Sep 27, 2004 09:43PM)
... but I'm hardly the best. Still, I'm a better buy than the slot machine at the Indian casino.
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Sep 27, 2004 09:58PM)
Okay interesting.

Now how would you use it as part of a sales pitch?
Message: Posted by: Payne (Sep 27, 2004 11:31PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-27 22:58, Andy Walker wrote:
Okay interesting.

Now how would you use it as part of a sales pitch?
[/quote]

I am one of the more expensive childrens entertainers, but...you need a sales pitch?

I doubt dealers of Rolls Royces and Ferraris have much of a sales pitch. If a person has decided upon the having the best or most expensive of things they don't need a sales pitch. When dealing with a client my fee is the first thing I mention. If it's out of their price range I end the conversation as it's not worth either of our times hoping I'll lower my rate or they'll increase their offer to meet my fee.
Message: Posted by: Al Kazam the Magic Man (Sep 27, 2004 11:36PM)
HI Andy,

I"m with Den on this one. Using: however, that also provides, as well as the best etcetra, is the best way to complete your sentence.

I'm sure you going to get some good lines here though.

All the best,

JoJo
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Sep 28, 2004 02:12AM)
Yes I am one of the more expensive entertainers, and when you see my show and compare it with the others you'll see why.

Yes, I am one of the more expensive entertainers, but I've told you what you get for your money if you book me, now go and ask those others that are cheaper and see what you get from them.

Oh hello again, you did and what did they say? right but I'm sorry that time/date has now been booked, you can never be too early to book me, but it's so easy to be too late. Maybe next year.

As Den said the use of however is better than but, although I've left the 'but' in as per your question.
Basically though my answer depends on the bookers tone, I have lots of variations on the theme, it all depends on how the booker has come across on the phone. If they've been a bit offish, or demanding (you know what I mean) something like answer 2 gets used. I do love it when they are phoning round and when they come back to me the date/time has gone.
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Sep 28, 2004 02:30AM)
HI,
Even though I am in my area, I would never mention that in my sales pitch
Phillip
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Sep 28, 2004 06:06AM)
BUT is a negative word and as some great speakes have said, it should not be in your vocabulary.

As Politicians have said, it should be eliminated along with the word "I".

[b]If YOU want great entertainment, then YOU will have to decide what price YOU can afford for such entertainment.[/b]
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 28, 2004 06:20AM)
...But I do not consider myself as just a magician. I consider myself as a total solutions provider to the many clients, such as yourself. By providing family-friendly entertainment solutions, I can promise you that you will have more time to relax at your event and less hassles. You will also have many smiling faces and enjoy people telling you how glad they were that they came out.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Kent Wong (Sep 28, 2004 08:53AM)
... but you get what you pay for.

or

... but, if you've ever seen my show, you'll know I'm worth it.
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 28, 2004 09:04AM)
Saying you are worth it gets you no where or at least I have found. You must PROVE yourself to the suspect or prospect. They do not know you or have seen you before so how do they really know you are worth it?

Instead I want to listen to what they have to say. I get them to talk about the needs for their event. By listening to these needs, I can often change the conversation around to me solving their problems. When I do this I stop becoming a pricey product and instead I become a well worth it "problem solver" and "solutions provider" for them.

When you do this, your perceived value in their mind climbs and this means they do not have as much problem with the money your asking for.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 28, 2004 09:20AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-28 07:06, DenDowhy wrote:
BUT is a negative word and as some great speakes have said, it should not be in your vocabulary.[/quote]

Andy -

Den is 100% right on this. We were taught in our Dale Carnegie classes to not use the word "but" to bridge a sentence. "However" is also a bad bridge word.

Use "and" or a pause (new sentence) instead.

Example -- "I love you, but...", or "I love you, however...", cancels out the whole "I love you" part!

----------------------------------------

Here's how I personally would do it. I would use an analogy to back up my logic to the prospect.

Donald: [b]"It's true, I am one of the more expensive children's entertainers. And you can see from our testimonials that customers are very happy with our services.

Choosing the right entertainer is important. It's much like choosing the right restaurant for a SPECIAL meal.

If you always choose to eat at McDonald's, that's fine. Sometimes, if you REALLY want to impress your spouse or a special loved one, you will spend a little more, and eat at a nicer restaurant, with tablecloths, better food and a better atmosphere.

It will be a more memorable meal, and everyone will be happier. McDonald's isn't always the perfect choice, even though it is one the least expensive choices.

So, sometimes it is worth the INVESTMENT to spend a little more. Is the success of your event important to you?

Do you think it might be worth a little extra investment?"[/b]

- Donald
Message: Posted by: jrbobik (Sep 28, 2004 09:40AM)
Ok my two bits on this.

Eliminate the word "Expensive". From past experience if someone sees that the first thought is "hmm maybe I should look around first and see what is "Cheaper".

Just my opinion!

John B
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 28, 2004 09:43AM)
In this case, John, I suspect it was the prospect who said that statement to Andy. "Wow, you are expensive." He's just responding to it.

Am I right there?

In my response I turned it around to talk about "investment", rather than "expense".

- Donald.
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 28, 2004 10:17AM)
Donald:

Very nicely stated. I like how you worded that and got the message across without sounding aggressive to the prospect. You also gave them an analogy they can relate to well.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Sep 28, 2004 10:25AM)
As Phil said, I'd never bring anything like this up in my sales pitch, my answers would be to the question, Why do you charge more than the others, and my answer would then start, I'm one of the more expensive........
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 28, 2004 10:53AM)
I would never mention that as well, but my feeling is what would you say and how would you handle it if someone said, " oh your so expensive.. way more then I had thought." or something to that degree? When the prospect brings it up, then you need a solution as to what you might tell that prospect.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Starrpower (Sep 28, 2004 12:13PM)
Of course, you ALWAYS need a sales pitch. You may not call it that, but you'll need one. Yep, even guys who sell Rolls and Farraris. In fact, those guys are more likely to know precisely why their cars are more expensive, and they are prepared to explain it to prospects. To suggest otherwise is naive at best.

Now, as for magic ... you have to analyze your own program and, as already mentioned, anticipate their objections and sometimes answer them before they are asked. Often times, the only way to do this correctly is find out what they need -- there "hot button" -- and present your "pitch" from that perspective. See the "Money In Your Pocket" series (http://markstarr.com/magicians/products.htm#1) for details on how to do this with magic shows.
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 28, 2004 12:33PM)
Great stuff Star. By listening to your prospect first, you can really learn to key in on their wants, wishes and the problems they are trying to address by contacting you in the first place. Key in on these issues and you can really make a difference.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Sep 28, 2004 12:43PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-27 21:56, Andy Walker wrote:
How would you complete this sentence?

[b]I am one of the more expensive children's entertainers, but... [/b]
[/quote]

Apologies can be even more costly.

Cheap leaves a first impression too.

I have no arguement with those who know what their work is worth.

Bob
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Magic.J.Manuel (Sep 28, 2004 01:21PM)
I must agree with most of the previous posts, BUT I would change the whole sentence and drop the but and expensive.

I am the highest value for a family show, because I prepare a customized experience that your family will remember. My show includes personalized magic effects that will include your children in the magic, and make them the star of the show. Several times during the performance your child will be the VIP and make the magic happen.

There are several easy to prepare items I learned from Eric Paul's books that make each show unique and special for the family. Also including some goodie bags and a giveaway magic bag-o-tricks, shows to the parents that you provide more value hence justifying a higher fee. If you sell the experience (benefits/solutions), instead of selling tricks, you have a unique product that will elevate you to the premium level of expectations and fees.
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Sep 28, 2004 02:12PM)
I am one of the more expensive children's entertainers, but... I have a 3 wives and 7 kids theres more every day.

I think drop it. if yor are opening it might put them off talk them through it explain your tell it will benefit them and if you want I am one of the more...

matt
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Sep 28, 2004 02:14PM)
Donald is right, AND is a far better word BUT if YOU want to use BUT, then EXPECT those problems that come with BUT and HOWEVER.
Message: Posted by: Cheshire Cat (Sep 28, 2004 02:22PM)
Cut out the word "but". Just simply wait and see if they ask why you are one of the more expensive entertainers in your area.
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 28, 2004 02:36PM)
But why even tell them your expensive in the first place, unless they tell you? Is there a marketing reason or logic behind a magician telling a prospect that they are exspensive? I do not know... I am just asking.

I would never go this route. I always listen to the prospect and ask questions to them such as:

- what would you like as the total outcome for your event that your having?

- how can I be of service to you to make this happen by meeting and answering your own needs for this event?

Questions like this get them talking. It gets them to give me critical information that I can use. I can then listen to their needs and their wants for this event and then tailor my answers to meeting these needs.

If I go through this process, by the time the price comes into the picture, I have already won them over and have them not seeing me as a product but as a person who can solve their problems. In this way price does not becomes so much the issue.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: NJJ (Sep 28, 2004 04:19PM)
If someone says "Gee your more expensive then they other guys..." I say:

"Absolutely, that's because I give the best value for money. You don't just get a magic show...you get a full package with entertainment, balloon animals and audience participation. I'm fully booked up almost every weekend."

This says a) I'm good b) I offer more then the other c) Other people book me at that price and d) you better book soon or you'll miss out.
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Sep 28, 2004 04:30PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-28 15:36, magic4u02 wrote:
But why even tell them your expensive in the first place, unless they tell you? Is there a marketing reason or logic behind a magician telling a prospect that they are exspensive? I do not know... I am just asking.
[/quote]

There are only two situations I would tell a client I am the most expensive. The 1st is if I get an obvious price shopper who is only interested in hearing what my fee is. Rather than quote them anything I tell those callers I am the most expensive and that they probably could not afford my show. This does one of two things. It either gets rid of them or it sparks their interest in why I might be the most expensive. If they realise price may not be the most important concern I can usually proceed with my regular sales script.

The other situation is if they tell me I am expensive after I have quoted a fee. In that situation I want them to know I am the highest priced entertainer. I don¡¦t mind if they shop around for something cheap as long as they don¡¦t shop around for someone better.

The other little point in here is that when people think you are expensive that usually has nothing to do with your actual fee. Even they cheap guys get people telling them they are expensive, probably more so than someone like me. Funny but true. A couple of years ago my fees where less than half what they are now and I used to get much more price objections than I do now.

Yesterday I had a caller, (a father) after asking him how my offer sounded said it sounds expensive. I replied my saying my show is one of the more expensive available, but ¡K. Then as I paused to think what to say he politely terminated the call. I never got to finish my sentence.

Now I realise he was probably not the sort of client I want anyway, but I don¡¦t like being at a loss for words. Next time a similar situation happens I want to have a slick response.

Now I think those are very good points about not using 'but' or 'however' as a bridge. That tends to couch your statement about your fee in negative terms. You never say [i]a positive thing[/i] [b]but[/b] [i] a positive thing.[/i]

I also agree that there are more positive words that can be used other than expensive, like simply higher priced for example. I am more interested in meaning however than semantics. To me what you say is remembered more than the words you use.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 28, 2004 08:55PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-28 17:30, Andy Walker wrote:
Yesterday I had a caller, (a father) after asking him how my offer sounded said it sounds expensive. I replied my saying my show is one of the more expensive available, but ¡K. Then as I paused to think what to say he politely terminated the call. I never got to finish my sentence. [/quote]

Andy -

In this situation, here is what you say:

[b]"I understand that you are concerned about price. Aside from that, was there anything else about the show information that concerned you?"[/b]

By doing this you confirm their concern, without acknowledging that it is correct. Then you also work to smoke out any other objections.

Then, as I stated earlier, I would answer their objection with some reference quotes. You can draw attention to them generally, or get real specific with an applicable quote.

Possibly one that even states a parent's concern about the price, but that they were happy in the end, after realizing they made a good investment. (I have quotes like these, and think you do, too, Andy.)

Here's my quote, from a birthday show customer named Judy Wilson: "Thank you for supplying such splendid entertainment at our granddaughter Alexis’s birthday party. I must confess that when my daughter first mentioned the price of the package you offered that I hesitated at spending that amount of money... In the past we have had ice-skating, swimming, bowling, and McDonalds™ birthday parties but this one by far was the best one. This was well worth the money spent. I would whole heartedly suggest other parents or grandparents hire you to provide entertainment that will create memories that will remain with their children forever.” (Yes, this customer legitimately wrote this in a reference letter to me.)

Answer the objection with a "cushion" (the "understand" statement about their concern), then make an effort to smoke out any further objections, then let a testimonial answer their objection.

If you let a testimonial or analogy answer the objection, you take the heat off of the fact you could brag about how great you are or how busy you are (that is "me-me, I-I" thinking). Let a past customer do that for you, because it carries more weight.

If you want, it would also be a good time to explain your guarantee, if you use one. This might have helped to deal with his concern, in addition to sharing the quote.

- Donald.
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Sep 29, 2004 12:37AM)
HI Donald,
Handling objections ext like you do is fine and you can pull a certain percentage back this way if you want. I would personaly just follow Andys route if they cant afford me or don't want to afford me there are plenty more out there who can and will book me so why be bothered trying to talk them around unless of course you are desperate for work
Phillip
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Sep 29, 2004 02:18AM)
I'm not the best but I'm one of them.

Seems people in these parts follow a comment (when I provide the price) with "how long does the show last?"

Then they look at the hourly rate at $125 or so and think it is insane. They have no clue what goes into the show etc.
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Sep 29, 2004 06:47AM)
HI,
well $125.00 equates to about £69.00 (very low rate for magician 1 hour) However, if your washing mashine broke down you would be charged at least that for call out then time and parts. you are being called out, performing at thier selected venue for a private audience. providing top quality entertainment that will create happy memories for their child to cherish for a lifetime! I no who I would prefer to pay my $125.00 to (unless my washing mashine broke... TE HEE)
Phillip
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Sep 29, 2004 07:33AM)
Donald do you really quote from customer testimonials over the phone? I'd never considered that because it just would feel so weird. But maybe it is not as silly as it sounds. Anyone else do it?
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 29, 2004 08:57AM)
Philip -

It depends how many prospects you get that call, and also what percentage you want to close, whether you choose to overcome objections or not. (Some people don't even track this sort of thing.)

Some people don't deal with objections because they choose not to bother (like you have stated). But some don't deal with them because they don't know how, or don't even understand what objections are.

-----------------------------

Wayne -

I would encourage you to have a sales script written out (eventually can be memorized, but use the written as a guideline when talking on the phone).

Your sales script can start by asking the customer relevant questions, then describing your show in detail offering features and benefits, and [b]lastly[/b] quoting the price.

Even though the customer may ask for rates early, you don't have to answer that question immediately. If you need to understand this better, [url=http://www.thedean.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=1652&st=0&#entry15512]read this post I made on the Dean's List[/url], especially towards the end, where I share how I deal with the price question from an overly-anxious customer.

If it comes down to it, I basically tell them that I am going to ask them some questions, then give them show information, then tell them the prices. They have to wait until the end to hear the rates.

Even the UK members, who often approach kid show marketing with a different slant, use a phone script / pitch (a consistent sales presentation, written or memorized), and quote the fee at the end. The show prospect should know more about your show and the length BEFORE the rates are quoted. It will increase response. :)

-----------------------------

Andy -

Yes, in every sales presentation, I try to quote a testimonial. This was something taught to me in my Sales Advantage Course. AND IT WORKS!

It feels awkward at first, and you have to memorize some quotes, or at least have them on hand. Quote the appropriate type of quote for that type of customer.

However, even though it is a difficult thing to learn at first, it is to your benefit.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: Mike Robbins (Sep 29, 2004 09:59AM)
Depending upon what you want for the outcome, "but" can be just the word to use. The word "but" negates the preceding part of the sentence.

For example, imagine a prospect said "I really like what you're offering, but I don't have the budget for it." Assuming you want the sale and are willing to work with them, find out what their budget is and perhaps reply with "I understand your budget is limited, but I think we can perhaps have a 30 minute show instead of the 40 minute one and that will fit the budget."

As for being considered expensive, I am. I find that most of my kid show bookings come from the same part of town. I do get people who call, ask my price, and then move on to window shop more. There are cheaper magicians in my area and I'm sure they book them. But I'd rather do 10 shows for $x than 100 shows for the same amount.

Mike
Message: Posted by: kOnO (Sep 29, 2004 10:35AM)
Is everyone on this forum the highest priced entertainer in their area?

I feel that I am the best in my area but I do offer several different shows with competitive prices for different markets. If someone main concern is the price of the show I offer what I call the bargain package, they will still get a great show, just shorter with less give away’s and perks. I do not try and undercut the competition just try to keep my prices competitive in the market place.

kOnO
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Sep 29, 2004 11:44AM)
I feel that I am the best in my area but I do offer several different shows with competitive prices for different markets.


Hi,
ultimately it matters little wether you think your the best. the trick is to get your clients to believe you are the best.
phillip
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 29, 2004 12:01PM)
Phillip:

Absolutely correct. It is not what YOU think of how good you are. You have to change the perceived value of what the prospect or client thinks of you and the services you are offering them. Get THEM to see you as the personto solve their event problems, and they will not care as much about the price.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Sep 29, 2004 02:19PM)
When someone says it's more than they imagined it's often because they've never booked anyone before, and didn't really know what to expect.

If I get the impression from their tone that I really am out of their price bracket, I don't push it, They've been told the fee, it's take it or leave it. If they leave it another booker will call and take the slot.

If they start to try and haggle "do you give a discount for cash?" etc, I ensure that I put a mark on their paperwork to ensure I get full payment before I start, just in case they try and haggle again afterwards. There are people out there who no matter how good your show is will still try and rip you off for a few bob if they can.
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 29, 2004 02:43PM)
They sure will. Which is why I use contracts and confirmation letters almost all the time. It really does help protect myself as much as I can.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Oct 2, 2004 02:38PM)
If all you want is "the cheapest entertainment you can get," look elsewhere. I offer you the lowest prices for a QUALITY SERVICE. If you're going to cancel me when you find someone $5 less, I'm probably not the guy for you. I'll price-match a show with features as good as mine, if you can find one. There are plenty of guys doing tricks they just bought at the magic store yesterday — they charge less because THAT'S ALL THEY'RE WORTH and because THEY DON'T OFFER NEARLY ALL THE FEATURES I OFFER.
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (Oct 2, 2004 04:52PM)
<<<<"I understand your budget is limited, but I think we can perhaps have a 30 minute show instead of the 40 minute one and that will fit the budget." >>>>>

Why? when another booker paying the full price will ring for that slot. I often get the "oh how much for just a 30 minute show instead of an hour" question, when they can't afford the fee. I tell them it's the same price. my lowest fee is my 1-hour fee I don't go out for less. I never barter they get told a fee and it's take it or leave it.

I offer a one hour or 2- hour package, but I never tell them about the 1-hour unless they ask. Even if they start the conversation with, "I'm looking for someone for an hour at a party," I still go into the full 2-hour explanation. most don't even realise they could book for 2-hours and book it.

Those that are insistent they just want the 1-hour get told they can have the 1-hour magic show if they want, but only on a weekday, not a weekend.
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Oct 3, 2004 11:57AM)
Genuine snippet from phone conversation last year after quoting price:

Booker: We had ***** last year and he only charged X pounds.
Me: I charge Y pounds.
Booker: You should charge the same as *****
Me: Why don't you just book ***** again?
Booker: Well, he wasn't very good.......

I don't mention that I'm one of the more expensive magicians in my area in my phone pitch. I just matter of factly quote my price. I'm probably too curt with people who argue over the price. I'm offering a professional service not selling a fish at the market.

George
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Oct 3, 2004 05:01PM)
Thanks for all you thoughts on this, especially Donald & Phillip. I've been thinking about this a bit & I agree some people that have price objections I probably am not going to want to bother with. That is part of the reason I have set my fees higher. I want to screen out people that don’t value what I do. To help me judge early on whether price of going to be an issue or separate the wheat from the shaft I have finally got a caller ID display unit. I can tell from the 1st three digits of a phone number what part of the city people are calling from. I know what regions most of my work comes from & if callers are outside these regions I can expect price objections.

As far as dealing with a price objections I've decided to say something along these lines.

[i]The shows I do are not cheap, but they are good! I believe Johnny deserves an unforgettable party with all the fun & excitement a good magic show can bring. It is also worth it for you to not have to worry about the entertainment. This will give you the opportunity to relax & enjoy Johnny's special day yourself.[/i]
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Oct 3, 2004 05:45PM)
"I'm offering a professional service not selling a fish at the market."

True, but sometimes a $10 "budge" in response to a request will nail down a sale ... IF you really want to fill that time slot very badly.

[Thoughtfully...] "I could give you ... (X-$10) ... my business manager (there is no such guy, but the caller doesn't know that) will be really upset with me, but I could do that for YOU."
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Oct 3, 2004 06:02PM)
Andy, this might be just a local thing but I find the people who argue over the price are quite often the ones from the richer areas! I suppose that's how they got rich...

Ross, that's true, people do love to think they're getting a bargain. Maybe when I was starting out I'd be tempted to knock a fiver off to seal the deal on a weekday gig but nowadays I like to have a set price and stick to it. I feel it's more professional.

George
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Oct 3, 2004 06:22PM)
George, it must be a local thing. Local people never try haggling here. Actually the only callers that think my show is too expensive are people that only heard about me from my yellow pages listing. People that have seen me before, read my web site or been referred to me from a friend never seem to think that. Perhaps that is a sign I’m still too cheap. Sometimes I get people that have seen my web site say things like 'It sounds like your show is worth every penny, but I just can't afford to spend that much'. Usually these are the same people have already committed to a PlayStation II gift and a bouncy castle before thinking about a magic show as a possible extra.

The only people that ever seem to want to bargain over the price are immigrants from particular countries. Even then it is not usually a real price objection; it is just a cultural thing they always do.
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Oct 3, 2004 06:35PM)
Same here, it's only the folks who have just come across my name in the YP that have price issues. Haggling actually happens very rarely. (I just can't get the image of Eric Idle selling a gourd out of my mind everytime I say that word) but the few times it has it's been the rich folk. The example of the phone convo I gave above is a prime example. The woman spent ages trying to get me to knock a tenner off my price. I actually felt a bit mean for sticking to my guns when I put the phone down because I thought if she was trying that desperatly she must really need the extra £££'s. When I turned up at the mansion she lived in my jaw hit the floor.
George
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Oct 11, 2004 01:41PM)
[quote]
On 2004-10-03 19:35, magicgeorge wrote:
Same here, it's only the folks who have just come across my name in the YP that have price issues. Haggling actually happens very rarely. (I just can't get the image of Eric Idle selling a gourd out of my mind everytime I say that word) but the few times it has it's been the rich folk. The example of the phone convo I gave above is a prime example. The woman spent ages trying to get me to knock a tenner off my price. I actually felt a bit mean for sticking to my guns when I put the phone down because I thought if she was trying that desperatly she must really need the extra £££'s. When I turned up at the mansion she lived in my jaw hit the floor.
George
[/quote]

Thats exactly right - you don't get rich by spending money.

I dropped my price for a party - Turned up to a big house and drive full of Mercs , BMWs and Jags.

Never did it again.

Paula
Message: Posted by: Lee Darrow (Oct 11, 2004 04:09PM)
Sometimes dropping your price will cost you a gig.

Snob appeal, for want of a better term, is often something that can close a deal faster than anything, especially among the yuppie set and the upper crust types. They are VERY competetive, especially when it comes to their children and what they do for them.

In many cases, I have found magicians to be woefully underpriced for their markets and, in some cases, by underpricing as they do, they kill the credibility of magicians as a whole with certain portions of the buying public.

How many times have we heard "magicians are a dime a dozen?" That comment does not only relate to how easy it is to find a magician, but to our perceived pricing out there.

Just a couple of thoughts from a guy who won't work little kid's parties, but will work Bar - bat mitzvahs, Sweet-16's and the like and who found out the hard way that he'd been charging too little.

Lee Darrow, C.H.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Oct 11, 2004 04:20PM)
I have a script, think it's just I get soft sometimes.

Some great advice on this thread, keep it coming:)