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Topic: What the public doesn't know
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 28, 2004 09:28PM)
Some coins are ferros (iron) based.
And we can use a m****t with them.

Here in the UK:

Newer 2 pence
Newer 1 pence

As we have magicians from all over the world here, what coins from your country are the same?

Paula
Message: Posted by: iamslow (Sep 28, 2004 09:48PM)
All the Canadian coins except some pennies.
Message: Posted by: billfromoregon (Sep 29, 2004 12:48AM)
Unfortunately, here in the US, none of our coins are (though I'm certainly not above using foreign coins, or having Todd or Jamie gaff some up for me).
Message: Posted by: Stellan (Sep 29, 2004 02:10AM)
In Sweden there's the 5 kronor coin, a coin slightly smaller than a half dollar and therefore good for magic. There is mostly nickel in it so it will not get a very strong attachment to a m.
Message: Posted by: CardMaker (Sep 29, 2004 08:11AM)
In EURO-land all copper coins (1, 2 and 5 cent). But these coins are way too small for magic purposes.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Sep 29, 2004 08:35AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-29 09:11, CardMaker wrote:
In EURO-land all copper coins (1, 2 and 5 cent). But these coins are way too small for magic purposes.
[/quote]Money/coins, sucks these days!!!

Even here in DK they came up with those small (and thin) coins and they fall to the ground between my fingers.

The ones designing coins should be coin manipulators. :)

Actually the "old" 5 DKK coin got replaced not many years back by smaller and thinner silly stuff.

I was wise enough to by a couple of coin rolls with 20 in each of the old ones. This is a great coin to handle and it is approximately 2mm larger in diameter then a half dollar.

That's a coin. :)

However I do understand why they make 'em smaller: they're easier to have in the pocket/purse, but somehow they still did a bad job. It's too difficult to specify one from the other. They are all small and useless for coin handling.

A half dollar, a Danish 5 Kroner from 5 years back or so, is great to handle.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan P. (Sep 29, 2004 11:35AM)
The 1 and 2 Euro coins are m****table too (not very strongly, but enough to be stuck under, let's say, a m****tic card.)
Jonathan.
Message: Posted by: Caruthias (Sep 29, 2004 12:43PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-28 22:48, iamslow wrote:
All the Canadian coins except some pennies.
[/quote]
Some dimes.
Message: Posted by: harris (Sep 29, 2004 03:53PM)
Certain years of old American pennies are magnetic.

You can get some of them copper plated, perhaps in your favorite magic store, online or ebay.

You could also go to your favorite coin dealer's junk box with a magnet.

Be safe and creative.

Harris
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 29, 2004 05:54PM)
Copper plating?

Very easy to do.

Saturated copper sulphide solution.

Anode of copper (-ve) (Copper pipe will do)
Coin is cathode (+ve) Cross of the (t) in cathode = positive (+).

Small transformer for power and about a week to get a good Cu coating.

Think back to your High School Physics.


Paula
Message: Posted by: Larry Davidson (Sep 29, 2004 06:09PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-29 18:54, paulajayne wrote:
Think back to your High School Physics.
[/quote]

Um, I didn't pay attention that day in class. :baby:
Message: Posted by: Mike Wild (Sep 29, 2004 07:27PM)
Cathode... Anode... Generator... Cu... Physics???

Hmmmm... I think I'd take the easy way

Coins... box... stamp... Lassen...Paypal

:)

Best,

Mike
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Sep 29, 2004 07:40PM)
I take a coat hanger and stick it in the outlet where?

Somewhere in the procedure we need a fuse, a transformer and a materials safety data sheet for that saturated solution which probably tastes bad even with that spoon full of sugar.
Message: Posted by: tpdmagic (Sep 29, 2004 07:46PM)
LOL.....what people don't know is that we are all geeks. Unless of course you tell them.
Message: Posted by: Mike Wild (Sep 29, 2004 07:59PM)
Your secret's safe with me Todd :thumbsup:

:hysteric:
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Sep 30, 2004 02:27AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-29 18:54, paulajayne wrote:
Copper plating?

Very easy to do.

Saturated copper sulphide solution.

Anode of copper (-ve) (Copper pipe will do)
Coin is cathode (+ve) Cross of the (t) in cathode = positive (+).

Small transformer for power and about a week to get a good Cu coating.

Think back to your High School Physics.


Paula

[/quote]If one has guts (and some spare coins), try it the easy way and get results within minutes. It works sometimes.

Simply dip/place the coin into (now I have to admit I don't know what you guys/and girls call it in (English) ferridchloride II. That is the solution/liquid they use to etch printed circuit boards. But you have to know what you're doing. That liquid is dangerous and can even ruin stainless steel sinks. Use a suitable plastic bowl or better, a glass bowl. Also, don't get it on your fingers, in your eyes nor on your clothing. Your clothing will disappear :)

When you buy it ask the chemist how to handle it.

It is rather cheap and you can get it as "powder/small pearls" and mix it with water yourself, but as mentioned, it depends on whether the coin works or not.
Message: Posted by: Eric Falconer (Sep 30, 2004 06:45AM)
I suppose I should go to Wal-Mart then and buy some ferridchloride. It's over on the ferridchloride aisle. I'm not sure if I should buy the brand name ferridchloride or the Wal-Mart knock-off cheaper brand. Hmmm... decisions, decisions.

hehe

Eric
Message: Posted by: mike gallo (Sep 30, 2004 07:07AM)
Any American coin you want to use is magnetic. OK, so first you have to send them to Todd or Jamie, but then they are. ;)

Mike
Message: Posted by: owen.daniel (Sep 30, 2004 07:16AM)
Paulajayne,
Thanks for the science. I did electrochemistry last term!!! Might well come up in my GCSE. When I am next in London, give me your address and maybe I can have some revision help!
Owen
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 30, 2004 07:31AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 08:16, owen.daniel wrote:
Paulajayne,
Thanks for the science. I did electrochemistry last term! Might well come up in my GCSE. When I am next in London, give me your address and maybe I can have some revision help!
Owen
[/quote]

All my life in engineering and magic - I suppose some of it sticks.

Why I remember this I have NO idea but for some reason it stuck - I have never had to use it.

Here goes:

Coefficient of linear expansion of Invar Steel = 0.0000012.

Isn't it strange when something gets stuck in your brain?

I wish my lines for my show would stick that well.


Paula
Message: Posted by: owen.daniel (Sep 30, 2004 08:15AM)
Can anyone remember anything about differentiation and integration? That might help too!

I am sure when I get out of school it will all be forgotten. Hopefully some will stick though. Otherwise University might be a bit challenging!
owen
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 30, 2004 08:21AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 09:15, owen.daniel wrote:
Can anyone remember anything about differentiation and integration? That might help too!

I am sure when I get out of school it will all be forgotten. Hopefully some will stick though. Otherwise University might be a bit challenging!
owen
[/quote]

Oh No

I have just realised that I can still prove that (4/3 Pi R cubed) is the formula for the volume of a sphere.

Damn you Mr. Calculus.

Help! My brain is filled with useless facts.


Paula
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Sep 30, 2004 09:11AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 08:31, paulajayne wrote:
All my life in engineering and magic
Paula
[/quote]Nice to know Paula...we've something in common. :kermit:
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 30, 2004 09:50AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 10:11, Werner G. Seitz wrote:
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 08:31, paulajayne wrote:
All my life in engineering and magic
Paula
[/quote]Nice to know Paula...we've something in common. :kermit:
[/quote]

Hi

Yes I find one compliments the other -

Paula
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Sep 30, 2004 10:52AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 10:50, paulajayne wrote:
Yes I find one compliments the other -
Paula
[/quote]Nasty Paula, nasty...that was NOT what I had in mind..I was strikly talking *shop*.. :)
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 30, 2004 11:46AM)
[quote]On 2004-09-28 22:28, paulajayne wrote:
Newer 2 pence
Newer 1 pence
[/quote]

Paula, you disappoint me.

I should have thought that you, of all people, living in London, would know that the word [b][i]pence[/i][/b] is [i]plural[/i].

It's 2 [i]pence[/i], but 1 [b][i]penny[/i][/b].
;)
Posted: Sep 30, 2004 12:49pm
--------------------------------------------------------
Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------
On 2004-09-30 09:15, owen.daniel wrote:
Can anyone remember anything about differentiation and integration?
--------------------------------------------------------
This semester I'm teaching a Calculus II course at California State University, Fullerton.

Integration techniques, applications to geometry and physics, infinite series, Fourier transforms, that sort of thing.
Posted: Sep 30, 2004 12:51pm
--------------------------------------------------------
Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------
On 2004-09-30 09:21, paulajayne wrote:
I have just realised that I can still prove that (4/3 Pi R cubed) is the formula for the volume of a sphere.

*** you Mr. Calculus.

Help! My brain is filled with useless facts.
--------------------------------------------------------
I covered that formula two weeks ago. It's not a useless fact. Please don't curse me for teaching it.
Message: Posted by: owen.daniel (Sep 30, 2004 11:59AM)
I love maths...It has to be my favourite topic in the world (and therefore I hope to go on to do it at university)...for that reason I am doing it early!!! We are just starting Mechanics, and are in the middle of a quick course on Calculus... I enjoy the challenge; and in many ways find it similar to magic. My last maths teacher had a real interest in magic, and helped me with many magic ideas using maths. one night I let him borrow my copy of Phil Goldstein's Redivider...he found it fascinating, and the next day came back with loads of other ideas requiring a palindromic stack. He also gave me a hand with magic squares of different dimentions on many occasions.

Owen
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 30, 2004 12:20PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 11:52, Werner G. Seitz wrote:
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 10:50, paulajayne wrote:
Yes I find one compliments the other -
Paula
[/quote]Nasty Paula, nasty...that was NOT what I had in mind..I was strikly talking *shop*.. :)
[/quote]
I meant Engineering and Magic -

You turned it around ;^)

Paula
Posted: Sep 30, 2004 1:23pm
---------------------------------------------------------
Quote:
---------------------------------------------------------
On 2004-09-30 12:46, S2000magician wrote:
Quote:
---------------------------------------------------------
On 2004-09-28 22:28, paulajayne wrote:
Newer 2 pence
Newer 1 pence
---------------------------------------------------------
Paula, you disappoint me.
I should have thought that you, of all people, living in London, would know that the word pence is plural.

It's 2 pence, but 1 penny.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Technically correct,
But since 13th Feb 1973 (The day we went decimal) penny was always related to the Old Penny and pence to the new as a way to differentiate them.

Paula
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Sep 30, 2004 01:01PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 13:20, paulajayne wrote:
I meant Engineering and Magic -
You turned it around ;^)

Paula
[/quote]Sorry...nasty me then :kermit:
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Sep 30, 2004 04:13PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 13:23, paulajayne wrote:
. . . since 13th Feb 1973 (The day we went decimal) penny was always related to the Old Penny and pence to the new as a way to differentiate them.[/quote]

That's the government for you: [i]We'll make it clearer by saying it [b]wrong[/b].[/i]

(I know, it should read "wrongly"; I don't want to be [b][i]too[/i][/b] pedantic, just pedantic [i]enough[/i].)
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 30, 2004 06:24PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 17:13, S2000magician wrote:
[quote]
On 2004-09-30 13:23, paulajayne wrote:
. . . since 13th Feb 1973 (The day we went decimal) penny was always related to the Old Penny and pence to the new as a way to differentiate them.[/quote]

That's the government for you: [i]We'll make it clearer by saying it [b]wrong[/b].[/i]
(I know, it should read "wrongly"; I don't want to be [b][i]too[/i][/b] pedantic, just pedantic [i]enough[/i].)
[/quote]
LOL

Paula
Message: Posted by: sullivanl (Apr 24, 2005 08:03PM)
In Hong Kong, the 50c coin is attracted to a M****t. I use it with the Raven all the time. I also think the smaller 10 and 20c pieces are, but they are too small to do anything useful with besides maybe some PK effects.
Message: Posted by: Josh Riel (Apr 25, 2005 12:41AM)
[/quote]

All my life in engineering and magic - I suppose some of it sticks.

Why I remember this I have NO idea but for some reason it stuck - I have never had to use it.

Here goes:

Coefficient of linear expansion of Invar Steel = 0.0000012.

Isn't it strange when something gets stuck in your brain?

I wish my lines for my show would stick that well.

Paula
[/quote]
Oh Yeh? Well I know how to triangulate, and I don't mean just: "three, four, five".

I have nothing of value to offer to this conversation, do I?

I can't even quote right.

Now I've soiled myself! Are you happy now?

And I meant "Yeah"
Message: Posted by: John Long (Nov 12, 2005 05:02PM)
This post is a little late but..

I think that the compound that can be used to plate copper onto a coin is copper sulfate, not copper sulfide(which is probably insouluble in water).

As far as the "feridchloride", hmmm, maybe the poster meat ferric chloride, or ferrous chloride. Either way, it would not produce a copper coating; it does not contain copper.



John