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Topic: Polishing Silver Coins
Message: Posted by: W.F. Lewis (Jan 3, 2005 10:49AM)
Hello folks,
Just interested in what everyone thinks is the safest and most effective polish for your Morgans and your silver halves.


Thanks for your suggestions,
Willie Lewis
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 3, 2005 11:10AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 11:49, Willie wrote:
Just interested in what everyone thinks is the safest and most effective polish for your Morgans and your silver halves.[/quote]

So am I, I mean interested.
Thing is, brand new f.ex. Morgans or also silver halves, that came in a plastic bag have a very nice, a bit dull, look and when they get polished for some reason or after extensive use got a bit too dark like silver normally does. The original, a bit dull/mat surface will get blank and not nearly as nice as it was when the coins where brandnew.
Unfortunately I suppose there is no solution one can polish them, but then they get very 'blank/shiny', no matter which polish is used. :(

Some say one could use ashes from cigarettes or cigars, others recommend a solution as outlined at:
http://utut.essortment.com/howtocleanpol_rkvl.htm
But I suppose I haven't tried it out, the result will also be a far too blank surface. :(
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 3, 2005 11:17AM)
I throw my coins in a jeans pocket->washing machine+dryer, or just wash them in my hands using soap and water. Some coins, first time around may need some actual polishing. For that I use Gorham's Silver Polish and an old towel or tee shirt that will get trashed.
Message: Posted by: Magic-Daniel (Jan 3, 2005 11:20AM)
The best I've ever tried is toothpaste. that's right, try it yourself.

Daniel
Message: Posted by: Hank Miller (Jan 3, 2005 12:09PM)
I have to agree with the tooth paste. And if you look real close you can see the bust smile.

-H
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 3, 2005 12:14PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 13:09, Hank Miller wrote:
I have to agree with the tooth paste. And if you look real close you can see the bust smile.

-H
[/quote]When 'they' smile at you, they're polsihed too much :kermit:
Message: Posted by: curt (Jan 3, 2005 12:56PM)
I've always been a big fan of NEVR-DULL. Been using it for years.

http://www.nevrdull.com/

cheers...

......curt
Message: Posted by: W.F. Lewis (Jan 3, 2005 01:43PM)
Thanks so much!!!

Just waiting on Dan Watkins to chime in. :)
Message: Posted by: Rob Johnston (Jan 3, 2005 01:52PM)
Roth taught me that the best way to keep your coins shining, is to handle them constantly.
Message: Posted by: W.F. Lewis (Jan 3, 2005 02:29PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 14:52, Rob Johnston wrote:
Roth taught me that the best way to keep your coins shining, is to handle them constantly.
[/quote]


Yeah, that's what the Link Werner offered says....
I just got these and they need that initial polish.
I guess I will start with some of the polish that was reccomended.
Message: Posted by: Rob Johnston (Jan 3, 2005 03:04PM)
In that case...a salt and vinegar solution works wonders and lasts longer than the industrial chemicals.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 3, 2005 07:45PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 16:04, Rob Johnston wrote:
In that case...a salt and vinegar solution works wonders and lasts longer than the industrial chemicals.
[/quote]That's for copper, [b]NOT[/b] for silver!
Message: Posted by: W.F. Lewis (Jan 3, 2005 09:04PM)
Werner,
This is from the link you provided....=)

"CORROSION caused by food or salt can be removed by soaking silver in a mixture of hot vinegar and salt for up to 5-minutes at a time. Use two cups of vinegar for every tablespoon of salt. Rinse. Dry well. "
Message: Posted by: tabman (Jan 3, 2005 09:32PM)
Cigar ashes for a fine powder polish. Use a damp cloth. Don't use your fingers though it's tempting. Cigarette ashes work too but not as fine as cigar ash. Try it. I learned it from my granddad. You will be amazed.

-=tabman
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Jan 4, 2005 01:08AM)
Wright's Silver Cream. Can't be beat.
Message: Posted by: leko (Jan 4, 2005 03:19AM)
Use Ammonia Water 10 % (druggist) and apply with an old hanky, it removes only the dark sulfides and doesn't attack the silver.
DON'T use cleaners or polishes as most contain abrasives which remove a tiny amount of silver and give the coin a too shiny, glistening surface.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 4, 2005 03:43AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 22:04, Willie wrote:
Werner,
This is from the link you provided....=)

"CORROSION caused by food or salt can be removed by soaking silver in a mixture of hot vinegar and salt for up to 5-minutes at a time. Use two cups of vinegar for every tablespoon of salt. Rinse. Dry well. "
[/quote]Hmm, strange, that 'prescription' actually originally was for copper and the vinegar wasn't supposed to be hot.

I've tried it solely on copper, where it worked very well, but some others said it wasn't good for silver..anyway, the latest tip here mentioned re using a solution of
useing Ammonia Water 10 % sounds good, because there is mentionmed this doesn't 'polish' but just removes the dark sulfate..so I suppose this is good for brand 'new' silvercoins that not yet have been polsished, just good a bit dark..

I haven't tried it out but it's worth to try..anybody fast enough to have a go and let us know??..will take a little while before I will have a go.. :)
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Jan 6, 2005 09:10AM)
The only time I have ever polished my coins are to try to get them to match. Once accomplished, I let them wear normally.

I used something called "Never Dull" which is in a can. It is some type of fluffy fiber (cotton maybe) impregnated with a silver polish. You rip off a piece of the fluffy material and rub it on the coins to shine them up.
Message: Posted by: W.F. Lewis (Jan 6, 2005 09:23AM)
Thanks Dan!!!


=)
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 6, 2005 10:11AM)
@Dan,
I think *never dull* has been mentioned before in this thread together with a link:
http://www.nevrdull.com/

My immediate thoughts re this are, that this fluffy fiber thing is too hard a polish and will get -no doubt- the coin very blank..

Would be great to have/find a solution that keeps brand new coins in the state (re surfaceappearance) even after they got tarnished, by simply removing the tarnish without polishing the coin too blank..

Brand new Silver$s aren't 'blank' but have a slightly mat/dull appearance, which I -for one- actually prefer before a really blankpolished one..

So when starting to use brand new coins and after they wheren't used for some time and got tarnished and that tarnish could get removed and the coins would then be in their origional state, THAT would be great :)
Message: Posted by: Rob Johnston (Jan 6, 2005 12:40PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 20:45, Werner G. Seitz wrote:
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 16:04, Rob Johnston wrote:
In that case...a salt and vinegar solution works wonders and lasts longer than the industrial chemicals.
[/quote]That's for copper, [b]NOT[/b] for silver!
[/quote]

Works on silver for me. Must have different vinengar in Denmark eh?
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 6, 2005 03:14PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-06 13:40, Rob Johnston wrote:

Works on silver for me. Must have different vinengar in Denmark eh?

[/quote]Yeah, we also drink it :kermit:
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Jan 6, 2005 03:39PM)
Werner, you can vary how much of the never dull you use.

If you just rub a few times and then wipe it off with a paper towel, you can to slightly clean up coins without polishing too much.

My current set of coins, I simply bought soft coins, washed them to get the dirt off, and never polished them. They retained the tarnish in the features.

I perfer these.
Message: Posted by: W.F. Lewis (Jan 6, 2005 03:43PM)
I am trying to get the "dark" look around the features.......looks nice to me.

It's just that I have a couple that look like they were found in a shipwreck or something, horrible staining.
Message: Posted by: Rob Johnston (Jan 6, 2005 04:00PM)
The brightest bright I have ever got a coin was from using my dremmel tool with the buffing insert. Some buffing sets will come with a very nice buffing compound. That is what I used, and my silver is still shining.

Some people don't like shiny coins, but I do.
Message: Posted by: leko (Jan 7, 2005 03:56AM)
For close-up IMO coins must look as normal as possible and not be too shiny. You can mix Ammonia Water 10 % (pungent smell!) with water and leave a bit of the dark sulfides in the deep ridges. This gives the coin a nice used but not dull appearance.
Message: Posted by: Eric McDonald (Jan 14, 2005 01:53PM)
Rub a little baking soda and water on them with your fingers. Then wash them off with some HOT water and a little dish soap. And like Dan - the only time I ever polished my coins was to get them to match.
Message: Posted by: weepinwil (Jan 15, 2005 07:45PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 11:49, Willie wrote:
Hello Folks,
Just interested in what everyone thinks is the safest and most effective polish for your Morgans and your Silver Halves..........


Thanks for your Suggestions,
Willie Lewis


[/quote]

I use a dip solution sold at Wal Mart for about 3.00 to clean silver jewelry.
Message: Posted by: lunatik (Jan 15, 2005 08:41PM)
Cheapest and nicest way to polish silver in general is to get a small pot filled halfway full of water and get it boiling.. then get a sheet of aluminum foil about 3/4 the size of the pot and sprinkle some baking soda on it..then place your silver coins or whatever on it and place it in the water. Waaaalaaaa!! silver is sparkling clean with no harsh chemicals. tell me how you like this method!!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 15, 2005 09:29PM)
That works after the silver is smooth etc
When it needs to be polished... it needs polish.
When dirty, just soap and water works fine for me.
Message: Posted by: leko (Jan 16, 2005 02:19AM)
Ask the real coin collectors what they use to clean their valuable silver coins.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 16, 2005 05:31AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-16 03:19, leko wrote:
Ask the real coin collectors what they use to clean their valuable silver coins.
[/quote]And what do they use?
Your posting reminds me re a question asked an expert gambler how he dealt *seconds*..
His answer was: Just put the deck in your hands and deal.

That information is as good as the information you did provide.
A big thanx for explaining it so intensively...
Message: Posted by: el toro (Jan 16, 2005 06:58AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-16 03:19, leko wrote:
Ask the real coin collectors what they use to clean their valuable silver coins.
[/quote]

I don't think coin collectors would even consider cleaning their coins. Apparently it reduces the value.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 16, 2005 07:09AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-16 07:58, el toro wrote:
[quote]
On 2005-01-16 03:19, leko wrote:
Ask the real coin collectors what they use to clean their valuable silver coins.
[/quote]

I don't think coin collectors would even consider cleaning their coins. Apparently it reduces the value.
[/quote]Well, AFAIK they normally just use a soft piece of cloth..at least that was what Fred Lowe, the earlier english policemen, making gaffed coins. told me way back in the 1970's.
But a soft cloth doesn't remove the tarnish from a brand new Silverdollar, that has been stored wrongly...
Keeping it in a plastic-envelope will prevent the tarnish..
I know..I've had some for over 30 years stored that way..
Message: Posted by: leko (Jan 17, 2005 01:44AM)
Werner,
Read my posts above. That method [b]is[/b] from a coin collector. Have you tried it?
But maybe they have still other methods.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 17, 2005 02:22AM)
@leko

It was my intetion to try your solution for a couple of days..and I will..

I was positive, I had some ammonia in the outhouse and 2 days back (weekend)I looked for it, but didn't find any.

So one of the next days, I'll buy some and mix the 10% solution myself.

Actually, the method you mention has my trust, I will try it out..

Did overlook that solution (ammonia) was posted by you, just reflected to your suggestion re how coincollectors do, with looking back :(

Thanks for reminding me, I'll try it out, some tarnished coins have been laying right beside me for a couple of days, waiting for getting the treatment..

I dislike the high-polish stuff..
I've used it earlier in lack of better, but it didn't please me too much..
Message: Posted by: Amazing Kenno (Jan 17, 2005 08:49PM)
Cola.....overnight. Your coins will be shiny and you'll think twice before drinking it after you see how clean the coins become. Kenno
Message: Posted by: Mercury52 (Jan 17, 2005 10:20PM)
Another method is to place some aluminum foil into a container. Put in salt and baking soda. Add very hot (boiling) water. When you put your silver in, the chemical reaction will take off the tarnish, and leave you with good, clean silver. Your coins must touch the foil for this to work. I don't have the exact recipe, my father found it online over the holidays. We used it on a few things, and it worked extremely well, and extremely fast. Good luck.

Kevin
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 18, 2005 09:23AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-17 02:44, leko wrote:
Werner,
Read my posts above. That method [b]is[/b] from a coin collector. Have you tried it?
But maybe they have still other methods.
[/quote]
Well, now I've tried it..not very effective at all :(
Unless maybe the coin have to be over night in the solution.

I had a brand new silver$ for almost 45 min. in the solution without too big results.
The dollar just had gotten a bit *yellow* not black and I wasn't satisfied with the result..
Polishing it afterwards with a soft cloth (dry) did clean it, but it also got a bit too blank.
I'm pretty sure, just polishing it without having been in the solution had given the same result..
I'll try to have another new Silver$ slightly yellow tarnished in that solution over night...maybe it helps, but so far I'm not impressed.
Message: Posted by: fccfp (Jan 18, 2005 11:44AM)
It is my understanding that coin collectors NEVER polish coins. Polishing always involves remoing metal and reduces the value of the coin to a collector. Washing is a different story and can be done with care. I guess it depends on the look you are going for and how important maintaining the value of the coin is to you.
Message: Posted by: leko (Jan 18, 2005 12:07PM)
In the sixties I learned the ammonia method from a coin collector. Have used it ever since: lay the silver coins for about 30 minutes in 10 % ammonia water, then brush and rinse in running water. However this method is too mild when the coins are very severely oxidized.
Yesterday I've asked the Royal Coin and Medal Museum. They advise the same method! Their second method: lay the coins a few hours to a day in 10% citric acid, then brush, rinse etc.
Haven't tried that yet.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 18, 2005 01:21PM)
I'll try citric acid too...I've it in stock..thx..
Message: Posted by: Partizan (Jan 18, 2005 03:06PM)
This is all dependent on RESTORATION or Cleaning. Restoration is used on very old coins often in poor condition. Cleaning may be as simple as a rub with a cloth.
To clean a silver piece acid is the best. But do you need to clean it to that stanard?
Restoration or that level of cleaning is mainly used for identification of the piece not to make it look cool.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 22, 2005 10:38AM)
OK..citric acid works, but it takes over 18 hours and one has to afterpolish with a soft cloth..

Any better method re removing the tarnish from silvercoins?

I suppose one can forget ever to get them back in original state, even brand new ones that got a bit brown/yellish, without using a soft cloth to polish them, which then easily makes them too blank..

I'm almost willing to believe the only way is to use commercial silverpolish, which does the job fast, but also makes them too blank.

[b]I haven't however yet tried baking soda with hot water and aluminuim foil in the bottom of a plasticcontainer..
Anybody have tried this, really tried it out, and not just read about it, and whith what amount of success??[/b]

Silver IS a probelm.
Copper f.ex. isn't..

It's easy to get *blank* (in this case) copper by dipping in a solution of vinegar and salt..that is a very eay way to get coper blank, but it doesn't last 2 days..
Silver however..no easy and fast way found so far.
Message: Posted by: Craig Ousterling (Jan 24, 2005 11:10AM)
I tried the baking soda thing last night. After years of hibernation the magician in me is comin' out. I polished my halves before packing stuff up a long time ago, and I found a really weird thing. I had my coins in a very small paper bag rolled up tight and taped closed with a label on the outside marking the year of the sets. Upon opening them I found that everywhere the coins 'touched' each other was is great condition, but the parts that were exposed tarnished. This sucks... as it leaves inconsistant sized half moon marks on the whole stack. :(

Baking soda didn't "CLEAN" the coins. It did however change the level of tarnish to a lighter tone. This doesn't work for me as the half moon marks are still there.

Wright's silver cream and silver polish was the available brand at my local grocery store. I took the advice of Pete and used the cream. WOW! What a difference. I love the way those old coins polish up. I use '64~'69 and am not really concerned about the resell worth. I really like the way they shine up... it's almost a mirror finish.

Craig
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 24, 2005 12:09PM)
Thanx Craig, what you posted makes sense to me..actually it is what I settled for too....

All those clever tips re removing 'tarnish' works on copper, but NOT on silver at all..

Using a silver polish does the job and one never can get back to the original state where the silver is slightly dull..

Another thing is, that one should store silvercoins (new ones) in a plasticbag, singly, only one coin per bad, the bag should be airtight.

Doing so, will prevent the silvercoins from tarnishing! 100%

Another method 'might', I haven't tried it, to wrap the coins into kitchen aluminium foil, this would probably match what you discovered, that they will not get tarnished, where alufoil is in contact with the coin.

Or, just stack the coins and wrap them into a plasticbag, so each coins touches another.
Message: Posted by: Dr. Faust (Jan 30, 2005 08:03AM)
I collect coins as well as do tricks with them. Even for the purposes of doing tricks, I cannot imagine polishing any of them (even silver coins). It makes them too shiny and gives them a very blank and flat look. The tarnish and dirt around the edges gives the coins character, detail and, of course, retains whatever numismatic value they may have. So, in my humble opinion, not polishing is the best way to go, for more reasons than one. However, if you have some routine that you think looks best with a set of blazingly shiny coins, go for it! There are always excetptions, subject to everyones's individual taste. In that case, I agree that you should consult a coin dealer, and use the safest, most value-preserving polish for your coins.

Numismagically Thinking,

Dr. Faust
Message: Posted by: tgroenjes (Jan 30, 2005 11:07AM)
Ok, I posted this in another section, but I'll pass the info on here too. Try this on a coin from your pocket, not a magic coin, to see if you like what it does. Use a pencil eraser to remove old crud and the like from your coin. You will be amazed at what it does for copper coins. As for silver and clad coins, I have a miracle answer. Go to your local music store (one that sells musical instruments such as clarinets and flutes and trumpets and the like) and ask them for a "Selmer Polishing Cloth" You want the one that is YELLOW. Selmer makes a blue and an orange one too, but you want the yellow one. It should say on the outside of it something like, "For nickel and silver plated finishes" Use this cloth to rub the coins and the tarnish will not only come off, but they will shine like new!

I am a jeweler, and I find that this cloth works better than ANY other cloth that I have EVER found in any of my jewelry supply catalogs. There are a lot of other silver cloths out there, i.e. sylvet, but they don't work as well as the Selmer one. While you're at it, try giving your jewelry or your sig. other's jewelry a rub with the cloth. You will be amazed!
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Jan 30, 2005 11:37AM)
Tgroenjes
Thanx for the info you providet...
I try to get a such 'cloth'.
Message: Posted by: implicit (Jan 30, 2005 04:01PM)
Removing metal from the coins always reduces value, try washing them instead.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 30, 2005 04:11PM)
Cleaning and polishing are two different things.

Heads up folks, bit tip coming.

I got some okay coins and polished them to smooth the basic surfaces a bit so the thing could shine. Polishing something makes it more mirrorlike.

Then, before a guest stopped by, I brought one coin into work and got some 100 percent alcohol from the lab and CLEANED THE COIN.

The surface of oxide, oil and dirt was broken up and wiped away. The coin looked like a MIRROR. There you go folks, a way to QUICKLY make the coins go from merely okay to really spooky clean.

Cheers.

PS, I used laboratory grade alcohol and was careful to keep the stuff off my hands and not spill or use around any sparks or flames, and in a well ventilated area. If you get the stuff, be careful!
Message: Posted by: BlackShadow (Jan 30, 2005 04:34PM)
Coin dealers or jewellers may occasionally use an ultrasonic tank to clean very dirty coins. This loosens some surface contamination without abrasion.

If you want information on coins in general a very good site is

http://www.24carat.co.uk/

Click on the information button and you can get to such pages as

http://www.24carat.co.uk/frequentlyaskedcoinquestions.html

It's a very well written and technical site which gives also gives you the diameters, weights, thickness and colours of coins from various countries. It could be useful in deciding what coins to use for a particualar effect or just ideas in general.

There are also some useful pointers - for example the current generation of 1p and 2p UK coins are steel plated with copper. Useful for Raven's without switches for example.

The cleaning advice is written from a dealer's point of view of course. Some magic workers may well prefer the mirror finish on common dates coins for various reasons though this would decimate the worth of a rare coin
Message: Posted by: Jim Stan Magic Man (Jan 30, 2005 06:02PM)
I have two product I use to polish my coins. One is called Flitz. It can be found in auto parts stores. It is a metal polish. This is good for normal coins. For silver coins I use Simichrome Polish from Happich. I bought a tube from Magic Inc. in Chicago about 15 years ago. It is still about half full. The polished state will last for years. I am not too worried about diminishing the value of the silver coins as I usually buy them from a coin shop and are not in good condition. The more the coins get used, the better they work for me.
Jim
Message: Posted by: tgroenjes (Jan 30, 2005 09:24PM)
Please note that the idea that I gave for cleaning and making your coins look good and newer does not involve any POLISHING or hard abrasive metal polishes. I noticed someone posted that polishing them removes metal and also decreases the value of the coins. Well, this is actually true. If I were to take the coins to work and POLISH them on a machine with a muslin buff and tripoli compound, or rouge, then I would be taking off the outter layer of metal of the coin. The idea of taking off the crud with a pencil eraser is NOT abrasive, and does not remove any metal. It only takes off the crap. Then I suggested to use the "Selmer" cloth. This is just a cotton cloth that is very soft and is treated to take off tarnish. It has a bit of an oily feel (But not much) and it will help shine the coin or jewelry, but it will in no way take off any metal from your coins. This is TOTALY safe to use. No harsh chemicals are involved.
Message: Posted by: aquariusmagic (Jun 18, 2005 10:47AM)
Goddards Silver Dip will remove tarnish or bleach such as Domestos will apply it. I have succesfully aged coins this way. Please bear in mind (I speak as a coin dealer amongst other professions) that collectors coins should never be cleaned except with warm slighly soapy water for fear of devaluing them. It should also be noted that Silver dip is not strictly speaking a polish (it is a chemical rather than an abrasive reaction).
Hope this helps
regards
Francis
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jun 18, 2005 11:05AM)
Francis,

Thanks for letting them know about the dip. I've used similar to both clean and to tarnish coins.

Yes it's amazing what some soap and water can do for most coins. I also use laboratory grade alcohol to give clean coins a mirror-like finish by getting rid of the oil coating normal handling deposits on coins.

:)

Jon
Message: Posted by: ehands (Jul 10, 2005 02:23PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-30 17:11, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Cleaning and polishing are two different things ... got some 100 percent alcohol from the lab and CLEANED THE COIN. The surface of oxide, oil and dirt was broken up and wiped away.
[/quote]
Unless the coin is grimy, I suppose the purpose of cleaning is to improve appearance/ I am not experience enough to know, however, if unseen oil from handling can also makes them a bit harder to Classic Palm? Following earlier advice in the Café, I recently got violin bow wax and Sortkwik. They improved retention.
Message: Posted by: evolve629 (Jul 10, 2005 02:31PM)
A little apple cider vinegar does the trick for me.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jul 10, 2005 03:52PM)
EHands, get yourself some laboratory grade alcohol, and a q tip or cloth. will cut right through the grime and oil and leave you with a MIRROR finish again. Is amazing. Gets the dull oil off. :)
Message: Posted by: houdini (Mar 17, 2006 10:02AM)
Walmart sells product called "Connoisseurs Jewelry Wipes. Comes in a red container. these are disposable wipes. Ive even used them on my copper cups and balls.
Message: Posted by: WhiteAngel (Apr 25, 2007 07:33PM)
My father is a coin collector, and says that it is almost voodoo to clean a coin. When they come off the mint, cleaning them can remove protective layers. Of course, this is t keep their value, as some coins he handles are only to be touched with a white glove! However, Silver cleaning compounds manufactured specifically for silver are the way to go if you must clean them. If you're only worried about keeping the shine, as (obviously magicians are) then silver compound, or baking soda mixed with a little water, (for those tarnished stains), toothpaste (use a soft bristle toothbrush for those hard to get surfaces), or cut a lemon in half and pour salt on it, the scrub the coin with the lemon. The lemon juices provide a softer acid than vinegar combined with the slight abrasiveness of salt (partially broken down by the lemon juice) can shine your coins. Also, silver jewlery cleaner.

My father says cleaning coins is taboo, but using them for magic is going to wear and scratch them anyway. These are the safest methods he gave me, (i'm on the phone now with him). Now to get him to sell me some cheap Morgans!!!
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Apr 26, 2007 07:15AM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 22:32, tabman wrote:
Cigar ashes for a fine powder polish. Use a damp cloth. Don't use your fingers though it's tempting. Cigarette ashes work too but not as fine as cigar ash. Try it. I learned it from my granddad. You will be amazed.

-=tabman
[/quote]
I've used ashes for years for both silver and copper, it's the best.
Typically though I prefer not to polish my silver coins, as I like the patina that silver gets, and it helps my coin handling, the coins "cling" a bit better and are much easier to work with. I sometimes have to polish copper coins, because they don't always tarnish uniformly, and there can be noticable differences in the appearance of coins and gaffs, so I occasionally polish them to get a "fresh start"
Oh and as Tabman said use a damp cloth, not your fingers, if for no other reason than your fingers will stink like an ashtray.
Message: Posted by: gene plampin (Apr 26, 2007 05:24PM)
I've also had good success with the jewelry dip at WalMart.

Gene
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Apr 27, 2007 09:37AM)
This topic seems to haunt us.

1) What condition are the coins in now? Dirty, pitted, rough surfaces...?

2) What do you want when you are done? Mirrors? Mirror finish to flat surfaces?

If they are dirty from use, try soap and water or better yet, pure alcohol to remove the dirt and oil.

If you want to change the surface of the coin... then you are looking at using a polish.

Anybody got a buffing wheel?
Message: Posted by: Justin Style (Apr 30, 2007 02:43PM)
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 11:49, W.F. Lewis wrote:
Hello folks,
Just interested in what everyone thinks is the safest and most effective polish for your Morgans and your silver halves.


Thanks for your suggestions,
Willie Lewis


DON'T DO IT!!!!

unless...


you want to















ruin the value of the coin!

Once you wash/shine/polish or what ever, you kill the value of the coin.
Message: Posted by: padre rich (Apr 30, 2007 03:32PM)
Hey guys, no need for the concoctions- There are polish cloths available for two or three bucks - Jewelers kinda keep them secret cuz they almost do as nice of a job as a polishing lathe (buffing wheel).If anyone has trouble finding them pm me .The ones that I find to work best are two cloths sewn together - one white and one blue . White is full of polishing compound - the blue is used second to remove any residue- They work fantastically - don't use the old rouge cloths as they are too messy- red stuff every where.
Use the cloths- unless you enjoy slathering some witches brew all over your coins.
Message: Posted by: Magic Roman (Oct 13, 2010 07:38AM)
Try using a rock tumbler to polish your coins. Use a very fine grit, and man they get shiny! I’ve heard of using hard large fish tank gravel, but that seems to big. I want to give the large gravel a try though. Good luck…
Magically,
Roman
Message: Posted by: Russell Davidson (Oct 13, 2010 08:07AM)
This is what you want chaps - http://www.britishcornershop.co.uk/product.asp?id=13643&curr=usd

It used to be called Duraglit but is now Silvo. Brasso is also available for copper.
Message: Posted by: T_C_Magic (Oct 13, 2010 09:18AM)
I tried the toothpaste with a toothbrush and it works great. My coins look like new.
THANKS!!!!!!
Message: Posted by: Zaprig1 (Oct 17, 2010 02:11PM)
Since this thread came back from the dead, I had to browse through it. I don't think I missed it, but hard to believe Tarn-X was never mentioned. Being a child of the 70's, they played a commercial for it 20 times a day! I always just wanted to dip a brown silver spoon in a bowl of it and change it back to gleaming silver INSTANTLY! :) BUT...no silver spoons in our house and therefore...no Tarn-X!

When I was finally able to afford uncirculated silver coins and gaffs i.e. '21 Morgans and '64 Kennedys etc., I couldn't WAIT to use it! HA! (insert geek jokes here) Of course, my Walking and Seated Libertys and other nicely aged coins will NEVER see anything buy my palms and fingers (and JOLs).

No "polished" coin will ever look like "new". It will look much more like a clad coin IMHO. That look is undesirable to me (but to each his own). Real silver coins in an uncir state look almost like anodized aluminum. However, they will and DO tarnish.

The moral to my story is this: If you want that "Mint fresh" look without the polished mirror look (which...as an experiment with a beat up Kennedy I tried ...found tarnishes much faster), try some Tarn-X. IT ROCKS!

Disclaimer: READ THE DIRECTIONS.

TIP: Keep it off any Teflon. ;)

Happy Cleaning,
Christian
Message: Posted by: alibaba (Oct 17, 2010 05:03PM)
[quote]
On 2007-04-26 08:15, DStachowiak wrote:
[quote]
On 2005-01-03 22:32, tabman wrote:
Cigar ashes for a fine powder polish. Use a damp cloth. Don't use your fingers though it's tempting. Cigarette ashes work too but not as fine as cigar ash. Try it. I learned it from my granddad. You will be amazed.

-=tabman
[/quote]
I've used ashes for years for both silver and copper, it's the best.
Typically though I prefer not to polish my silver coins, as I like the patina that silver gets, and it helps my coin handling, the coins "cling" a bit better and are much easier to work with. I sometimes have to polish copper coins, because they don't always tarnish uniformly, and there can be noticable differences in the appearance of coins and gaffs, so I occasionally polish them to get a "fresh start"
Oh and as Tabman said use a damp cloth, not your fingers, if for no other reason than your fingers will stink like an ashtray.
[/quote]

Where do you get ashes in this non-smoking era? Do they sell them on the internet?
Message: Posted by: lorenwade (Oct 17, 2010 05:33PM)
[url=http://www.themagicianscoin.com/resources/how-tos-and-tips-for-coin-magicians/how-to-clean-your-coins-with-household-items]There are a ton of household items you can use to clean coins.[/url]
Message: Posted by: Zaprig1 (Oct 21, 2010 10:16PM)
Alibaba,

PM me. I'll make you a really good deal on some ashes!
Message: Posted by: rklew64 (Oct 21, 2010 11:16PM)
My silver coins are in this black bag treated with some tarnish retardant and it seems to work so far. Sorry I have no reference where I bought them, but it was online and seems to be a common item. I never use my proof coins, those are the ones with a mirror finish.

Yea!! a thread that proves I am not the only person that appreciate shiny coins. Thanks for bringing it back.
Message: Posted by: Magiguy (Jan 12, 2011 10:10PM)
The toothpaste tip is terrific! Works like a charm, without over polishing.
Message: Posted by: cdmdu (Jan 13, 2011 03:32PM)
If you are sure that your coins are definitely ruined by anything, you can use cillit bang:http://cillitbang.co.uk/index.shtml
Just have rubber-gloves and say "F..K" to the nature.
Really good result, indeed! I use it for my copper cups and coins and it looks like a miracle.