The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Spellbound (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4
Curtis Kam
View Profile
V.I.P.
same as you, plus 3 and enough to make
3498 Posts

Profile of Curtis Kam
David, do you do a simple two coin Spellbound? Do you have the problems with it that Al Schneider has listed?

I suppose, from Kainoa's reminder about the "Wild Pocket" routine, that you can count me amongst the ones who find the trick more effective in the context of a routine, either as a series of changes (i.e. wildcoin) or as one half of a transposition. (i.e. the Schneider Coin and Cone)
Is THAT a PALMS OF STEEL 5 Banner I see? YARRRRGH! Please visit The Magic Bakery
Jonathan Townsend
View Profile
Eternal Order
Ossining, NY
27083 Posts

Profile of Jonathan Townsend
I'm impressed that someone can manage more than three coins in a routine that looks magical. I can see some clever stuff using four or five using a nice attachemt for a holdout, though to do this with only sleight of hand is IMPRESSIVE.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
David Neighbors
View Profile
V.I.P.
4835 Posts

Profile of David Neighbors
Quote:
On 2005-05-28 12:30, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
I'm impressed that someone can manage more than three coins in a routine that looks magical. I can see some clever stuff using four or five using a nice attachemt for a holdout, though to do this with only sleight of hand is IMPRESSIVE.

Well sleight of hand + Gaffs! Smile ! And no I don't do a 2 coin spellbould by itself.
People always said " It's 2 coins" I know I fake a spellbound change in a wild coin
routine and they are always surprised when there is no coin in the other hand.


Best David Neighbors
The Coinjurer
David Neighbors



The Coinjurer

www.coinjurer.com
wsduncan
View Profile
Inner circle
Seattle, WA
3618 Posts

Profile of wsduncan
Most of my unpublished work on the Changing Coin has followed the plot of size changes or of the coin changing to multiple coins which add up to the same value.

I think the problem with the traditional mode is that it IS two coins and there is nothing which links the first coin to the changed coin (except size).

Changing a penny to a dollar sized penny to a jumbo (ala Dingle's Inflation) or making it invisible (my Invisible Coin routine from Tubthumping) give the audience a connection between the coins.

If coin alters rather than changes to something different the magic seems more "real" to me.
Jonathan Townsend
View Profile
Eternal Order
Ossining, NY
27083 Posts

Profile of Jonathan Townsend
Simple triple change spellbound presentation ploy

Ancient secret to hiding valuables. Cover with a layer of lead, then a thin layer of gold. That way when thieves come, they see the gold, but test it to see if it's fake, and so find the lead, and leave it alone. Which is okay as long as they don't cut too deep and find gold underneath again. I suppose it's like an onion and every layer you peel shows lead or gold. Funny thing is if you go all the way down you find the good stuff, chocolate.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Curtis Kam
View Profile
V.I.P.
same as you, plus 3 and enough to make
3498 Posts

Profile of Curtis Kam
Jonathan,

Have you seen the prop Collector's Workshop used to sell (maybe still do) called "Half a Dollar"? It's an Ike dollar that's been split into two thin halves, and a cavity milled out large enough to take a quarter. The halves pivot so that the assembly closes into what looks like a single dollar.

So I'm thinking you borrow a quarter, make it bigger, change to a different color, then to the dollar, then slide open the dollar, and inside's the quarter.

John Mendoza had somethng similar, using the Johnson "Coin Casket" in the context of a spellbound routine.

Or another approach similar to the "nested" image you suggest: You do the standard copper/silver transposition for someone. You offer to show him how it's done. He holds the copper, you take the silver in, "the position" and it changes first to a blank silver, then a copper blank, then the copper coin. Accordingly, he finds the silver in his hand.
Is THAT a PALMS OF STEEL 5 Banner I see? YARRRRGH! Please visit The Magic Bakery
Jaz
View Profile
Inner circle
NJ, U.S.
6112 Posts

Profile of Jaz
It was mentioned that it is sometimes suspect that there are two coins.

In the two coin versions and depending on the angles you could
do a Sylvester pitch
or Wilson's Pitch and Ditch and end with one coin.

Judicious use of EG and Backpalm/clips add to the sense of there being just one coin.

A Hoo, steel or magnetic coin could also be used depending on angles.
mystre71
View Profile
Inner circle
martinsburg west virginia
1676 Posts

Profile of mystre71
As Curtis pointed out to me at Hank Lees "How do you end spellbound?

Anyone have a strong ending?

With my routine I try to use my patter for a reason to end the routine.



Joe
Walk around coin box work check it out here https://www.magicalmystries.com/products
Paul Chosse
View Profile
V.I.P.
1955 - 2010
2389 Posts

Profile of Paul Chosse
I have a finish for Spellbound. I can describe it, but it reads poorly. You have to see it, and understand the psychology of the routine in order to understand just how strong it is.

Here is a hint: The problem is that the spectator presumes that you are using more than one coin, but cannot figure out where the other coin(s) are. So, I use that presumption against him. I agree, saying that of course there are extra coins. I even know where they are sometimes. But at other times, I just can't figure it out. The explanation is in line with what they are thinking, but when they explore it, it is clearly impossible. The result? They short circuit.

I do a triple change, and the coins are different coins, and different sizes. The largest coin is an old English Penny, known as a "Cartwheel", and is twice the thickness of a silver dollar, and slightly larger than a silver dollar in circumference. The other coins are a half dollar and a regular english penny.

"So, I can understand how the small coins might be hidden inside the big coin, but I don't see how you could hide the big coin in the little ones, do you?"

This idea is what they think already, that the coins are tricked up somehow, so agreeing, but at the same time not understanding, leaves them wondering, "ARE they trick coins, or not? How DO they fit inside each other? Where DOES the big one go?" I let them have the big penny at the end, and I'm (apparently) clean otherwise, so they are completely at a loss.

Most spectators spend several minutes examining and pushing, pulling and otherways trying to open that big coin, until finally, they realize it IS just a coin. By the way, the monarch on that particular coin is King George the Third, about whom there was a movie recently done. He was quite a character, mad as a hatter, and makes for an interesting subject for conversation.

The other thing is that that coin was the first english penny minted, and the first real currency that the populace at large had access to. Prior to its issuance, coin was restricted to the wealthy, and the commoners obtained goods and services thru barter, another interesting conversational gambit, a good way to introduce the coin prior to the effect.

You can also talk about what the value of the coin would be today, versus what its numismatic value is. And then what the fifty cents you claim its worth is worth in current english money (still just a penny, but a smaller one...) etc., etc., etc.

Well, I hope I've given you some avenues to consider. I WILL tell you that having done this triple change for over 20 years, I never have a problem with the "You're just switching coins" response, and they always respond well. This is one of the strongest "One Coin" effects I do. I never leave the house without it in my pocket...
"You can't steal a gift..." Dizzy Gillespie
jerdunn
View Profile
Inner circle
1655 Posts

Profile of jerdunn
Nearly 30 years ago at the Magic Castle bar I saw David Roth do his (now) standard Spellbound routine. He also used what I later realized was a sleeving change.

The whole thing looked utterly magical, I suppose because 1) I was half layman at that point, and 2) his refined handling of coins and angles made his hands look otherwise empty. This left "magic" as the only explanation -- even though I knew the Vernon routine from Stars of Magic -- because the changes LOOKED magical.


One thing I learned from watching David Roth that night was to use a shiny silver coin; the sparkle of the coin creates a kind of dazzle in the retina -- and the mind -- of the viewer. This adds to the aura of magic.

I'm surprised to hear that so many laymen figure the magician is just switching coins. I suppose laymen may also think, "Oh, he just sneaked more sponge balls in my hand somehow" -- but they still scream when they open their hand.

Maybe there are two phases involved for the spectator -- the luminous, emotional moment of magic, and the later mental attempt at reconstructing what happened. In phase two, though, it's only speculation as to what the magician might have done, while the original memory of the magic remains.

At least, that's how it has been for me -- and it's why I fell in love with magic as a boy. It looked -- well, magical.

Jerry
Brian Proctor
View Profile
Inner circle
Somewhere
2317 Posts

Profile of Brian Proctor
A spellbound that will stun your audiences is Dr. Mike Rubinstein's "Twilight Zone." I first learned this routine 4 years ago when LL Publishing released his "Knock-out Coin Magic" video trilogy on DVD back in 2001. His routine involves 4 coins which each change in the most convincing way.

Another spellbound on his DVD is "Silverlint 2." This one is perfect for walk around magic. Ends clean with a jumbo coin finish that devistates people.

Thanks Mike for these great routines.
Curtis Kam
View Profile
V.I.P.
same as you, plus 3 and enough to make
3498 Posts

Profile of Curtis Kam
Joe, I was talking about the end to Spellbound at Hank Lee's because I was just about to tell you I had just come from meeting Paul Chosse for the first time, and he did a teriffic triple change spellbound with a wonderful ending. I don't have to do that here, since Paul himself was nice enough to describe the routine a few posts up. Those of you wondering how to script the ending, and how to deal with the inevitable suspicion that there's another coin, re-read Paul's description and analysis above. He defeats the suspicion by taking it head on, and addressing it as a part of his presentation. An odd approach, but effective if your technique is good enough to convince them that the only solution is mechanical coins.

We were interested in each other's triple SB's because they both owe something to Scotty York, and because I had also hit upon a false premise of mechanical coins. In my case, the Penny is hidden in the hole in the Chinese coin. They somehow combine to make a silver dollar.

Joe, we never got to finish our conversation, because we kept being interrupted by guys asking us if we really knew Eric Jones and where could they find him. Smile
Is THAT a PALMS OF STEEL 5 Banner I see? YARRRRGH! Please visit The Magic Bakery
tpdmagic
View Profile
Elite user
459 Posts

Profile of tpdmagic
For me, I have found over the years that more than two or 3 changes gives the spectator time to say;;;;;;your using more than one coin....LOL now that's not a bad thing as we are always prepared to cover ourselves. But that is why I do my triple change and it is a very very short routine. Only a few people have seen it and thanks Mike for the Plug, and Dans routine just rocks and is totally different than mine. Dan, Mike and Jon and a few others have seen mine when it was at the rough stages with presentation but that has changed. The only reason I am sharing all of this is simple. Spellbounds just like woman or guys(for some of you), ice cream, movies, websites and so on are personal tastes as to what you may like or we may like. The history is there to learn from which I think we should all do. But its all personal as our magic should be personal to us and our audience! Oh yeh one last thing Curtis yours NY Spellbound rocks and is what motivated me to work more on my spellbound...
BIlly James
View Profile
Special user
991 Posts

Profile of BIlly James
At the end of my spellbound routine, the color of my deck has changed from blue to red, and the final coin ends up inside my wallet!!!

;)
El Mystico
View Profile
Special user
560 Posts

Profile of El Mystico
What are people's favourite moves for a Spellbound routine?

The Vernon Stars of Magic handling for me - plus several of Michael Rubinstein's handlings.

What do you use?

Hey, El Mystico - why not check out the search before asking questions like this?
You might have found these threads

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......;forum=3

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......;forum=3

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......;forum=3

Next time do some checking before you open your big fat mouth.
5CardStud
View Profile
New user
26 Posts

Profile of 5CardStud
Re: Spellbound change

Firstly, let me say some excellent writings here from people I've only ever come across in books and videos. I'm suprised to find the likes of Mr Townsend, Mr Kam and Mr Chosse here. Im so glad I found this forum Smile

Anyway, I thought I would just share one thing that I find most impressive about the spellbound change. I always found it inherently more suprising and impressive when changing an object into another, not changing the colour of a coin. For examples of this: David Stones Wallet Pen. It really hits spectators between the eyes when the coin changes into the pen. Whenever I do this routine I always get the best reactions from spectators at this point. The only problem is, it doesn't make a whole lot of sense on its own, so remember your inner script and your presentational script must fit to match. Not to say that the original Vernon routine still doesn't stand up today and it wasnt pure genius, because it does and it was!

Keep the good discussion going guys!

5Card Smile
wsduncan
View Profile
Inner circle
Seattle, WA
3618 Posts

Profile of wsduncan
Quote:
On 2005-03-10 15:17, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Was wondering if you give out some hats and talk about people seeing what they expect to see... get one person in a russian hat, another in an english hat have them pretend to be from those places, get them talking in accents... then borrow a quarter ... or is that too much work for a little coin trick?

How about those little "Hello, my name is" nametags with British and Russian (sounding)names (Monty Python has lots of good brit. names). You could carry them in your wallet.
Jeff Haas
View Profile
Special user
907 Posts

Profile of Jeff Haas
I use a Spellbound drop change at the end of Roth's "Eraser Coin." I mention that the eraser actually still has the bits of the half-dollar that it scrubbed away, and I tap the eraser against the coin to knock all the bits out (and apparently balance them on top of it.) Then I drop the eraser into my pocket and do a Spellbound drop change to transform the erased coin back to normal.

This gets a terrific reaction!

Jeff
Curtis Kam
View Profile
V.I.P.
same as you, plus 3 and enough to make
3498 Posts

Profile of Curtis Kam
Quote:
On 2005-07-18 14:37, wsduncan wrote:
Quote:
On 2005-03-10 15:17, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Was wondering if you give out some hats and talk about people seeing what they expect to see... get one person in a russian hat, another in an english hat have them pretend to be from those places, get them talking in accents... then borrow a quarter ... or is that too much work for a little coin trick?

How about those little "Hello, my name is" nametags with British and Russian (sounding)names (Monty Python has lots of good brit. names). You could carry them in your wallet.


Or, hand them each a coin from the nation they will represent. When you address them, they are to respond with "Goodaye" or "Cheerio" or whatever. They may be assigned Pythonesque names, as well. Your single coin changes to match each of the spectators', as does your entire manner, allowing you to carry on a little exchange in phony foreign accents with each person until the bit gets old.

For the big, schmaltzy finish, you take back the marker coins, and the subject coin becomes a United Nations Commemorative piece.

Which you then might pocket as back rent, on behalf of the City of New York. depending on your political bent.
Is THAT a PALMS OF STEEL 5 Banner I see? YARRRRGH! Please visit The Magic Bakery
Jeff Haas
View Profile
Special user
907 Posts

Profile of Jeff Haas
No no no no!!

You take the marker coins back and change them into a string of silk flags. Play some patriotic music. Fire off some confetti canons (or party poppers.)
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Spellbound (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.19 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL