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Nemic386
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Pensacola FL
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I am posting this from the main branch of my local library. I have just returned from the "twilight zone"...aka 793.8 DUNH DUN DUH!!! (dramatic music) unfortunately it wasn't expansive I did pull everything it had which includes : Official Know it all guide: Magic for begginers, Magic for dummies, the art of magic (which looks to be more history related than anything else). And then there's mark wilson's closeup magic tricks. so those are my spoils of war, kinda' wished there was more. Can anyone tell me if these are any good? I know wilson's book should be...cause I have his complete course book. Also I ordered from penguin,Oz Pearlman's born to perform. can anyone give me some reviews on that or any of the other stuff?
"Magic is knowing it's impossible, but believing in it anyway"
Fiddling-Steve
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Born to perform is good for begginers. I had a chance to see it and I liked the tricks he has on it. I always use the card to mouth he has and also his version of biddle trick. I think its worth thiry bucks. You will like it.
Stick to the classics,

Stephen
Peter Marucci
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More? There's several lifetimes worth of work in Mark Wilson's book alone!

Wilson is a book that you should buy, because you will refer to it again and again over the years.

And don't dismiss the history of magic, simply because there are no "tricks" in it; first of all, you probably know too many tricks now; and, secondly, the history of anything that you are interested in is important, because if you don't know where you came from, then you don't know where you're going.
rikbrooks
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I can't recall ever disagreeing with Peter and I guess I'm keeping a streak going here. The history of magic is very important. It's one of the ways that a magician can tell a serious magician from a dabbler.

If you don't know who Dai Vernon was any magician worth his salt will smile nicely at you and end the conversation as quickly as he can (unless you've TOLD him up front that you are new to magic that is, then you have an excuse).

You should always know who invented any effect that you do. Of course, with cups and balls and linking rings that's impossible, but with chop cup, Zombie, etc, you can and should know.

Listen, if you invent a trick or technique, then you want others to know about it. If you don't credit the source of your tricks, another magician is not likely to teach you his.

By the way, I created the chop cup one handed engage. I watched someone performing my routine last month and I literally glowed when he credited me. This was BEFORE I introduced myself. What a thrill.
Nemic386
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The advice you guys have given me is exactly why I joined this forum. Peter, I am sorry if I came across as ingrateful, it was kinda disapointing to find so few books on a subject that I love!- I am a senior in high school and I read at about 800 to 900 wpm. so I literally CONSUME all I can read. But with magic it's different, I can consume the text involved but not neccesarily master the info. as far as crediting the originator of an effect I am very new, and would have to fall under the excuse the ignorance category. I love wilson's material, his complete course was the second book I bought. I was just wondering if the rest (mainly magic for dummies) was worth picking up. if heard mixed reviews on it and it seems most think the effects fall under the "watch me pull off my thumb" category.

I plan on picking up the art of magic book, because I want to learn about the formation of the art, not just the secret involved. I thank you all for your well needed input.
"Magic is knowing it's impossible, but believing in it anyway"
The Magician
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Magic for dummies is a great book for a beginner. I picked a copy of it up a while back and I still refer to it every so often. So I would definately recommend a copy
The Magician

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Peter Marucci
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Nemic writes: "Peter, I am sorry if I came across as ingrateful, it was kinda disapointing to find so few books on a subject that I love!"

You didn't come across as ungrateful at all. I can understand your frustration at finding only a few books in the library on a subject so near and dead to you.

I guess I was more fortunate than most, in that our local library had a large magic section (well, maybe two dozen book, which was "large" for the library) and I, too, devoured every one of them. And then, since there were no more, I went back and re-read them, getting something new out of each one of them.

And that may be the big secret to books: Every time you read one, you get a different perspective and learn even more from it.

Keep up the good work!
Nemic386
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Quote:
On 2005-05-02 15:24, Peter Marucci wrote:

You didn't come across as ungrateful at all. I can understand your frustration at finding only a few books in the library on a subject so near and dead to you.



I'm thinking this is a typo? just kidding I know what you mean, at just a glance through the wilson book an I saw bill in a lemon, which we all know to be a wonderful effect! thanks for your input Peter it, as always is wonderful and appreciated
"Magic is knowing it's impossible, but believing in it anyway"
calexa
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Quote:
On 2005-05-01 08:47, Peter Marucci wrote:
More? There's several lifetimes worth of work in Mark Wilson's book alone!

Wilson is a book that you should buy, because you will refer to it again and again over the years.

And don't dismiss the history of magic, simply because there are no "tricks" in it; first of all, you probably know too many tricks now; and, secondly, the history of anything that you are interested in is important, because if you don't know where you came from, then you don't know where you're going.


Absolutely right. Buy this book, and also "Born to perform" which is in my eyes very good for beginners.

Magixx
Optimists have more fun.....
Nemic386
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BTP the pearlman DVD? Got it and D***N right it's good- I have completely improved in the first week alone- it's funny because all the basics he goes over I have in print somewhere- I think it's because of the visiualization he uses that makes it easier to learn
"Magic is knowing it's impossible, but believing in it anyway"
rikbrooks
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I like BTP as well. Two of those tricks have become my favorite card tricks. Of course, I only do a half dozen, but I like Oz's treatment of them.
Nemic386
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Hey rik- quick question for you- how do you patter for 2CM? if you use it I mean- it seems too slow for me-maybe I'm just not 100% on the performance yet any tips?
"Magic is knowing it's impossible, but believing in it anyway"
JJDrew
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Magic for Dummies is a terrific book. I have blown away magicians with things I learned there. The title is lousy, but look through the first three or four pages at the contributors. There's material from a lot of the biggest names in magic today. It was one of my first magic books, and it's nice because it also touches on the theoretical and the ethical in magic. Too many books geared towards beginners are simply book-length lists of tricks.

As a sidenote, I highly recommend reading magic books designed for beginners, and even for little kids. It's a good way to find material that nobody else is using, because a lot of magicians consider these books beneath notice. You may have to sift through some fluff, but there are some gems in there if you're willing to look.
Magnus Eisengrim
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Hmm. On closer reading, I see that your library had Mark Wilson's Closeup tricks, not his Complete Course in Magic. Note that everything in the Closeup book is contained in the Complete Course, and the Complete Course is 472 pages vs. the Closeup's mere 88. (I hear that the newest version of the complete course has an extra chapter added !)

While you've got the Closeup, do take note of the full routines: Sponge ball and Cups and Balls are complete and nicely presented.

When you buy your own copy, make sure you get the Complete Course.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Nemic386
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Thanks John- I bought the complete course it was the second book I ever bought- as far as close up and complete course being the same? no I must disagree- upon looking through the book I noticed at least 3 tricks in there that were NOT included. I know it's only 3, but it's the only 3 I noticed I'll check the book out this weekend and let you all know what I find
"Magic is knowing it's impossible, but believing in it anyway"
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