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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Spectators think silverware is gimmicked? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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ashah
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One issue I've had with bending silverware is that I suspect many spectators think the silverware is gimmicked (heat-sensitive or something). I've had a couple of spectators suggest this explanation to me after they watched me bend forks. In fact, the first time I saw someone bend silverware (and I had no idea how it was done), I assumed that there was something fishy with the forks.

I make a big deal about letting my volunteer inspect the forks to make sure that they're real, and I also let a fork be passed around the room which I've put a corkscrew and tine bend in, so that everyone can inspect it. But I still worry that people will assume the heat-sensitive explanation whenever I do this with my own un-borrowed silverware.

Thoughts?
Scott Cram
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One of the best things to stop that line of thinking is saying, "Here, keep the fork. Check it out all you want."
RickSilmser
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Hi Ashah...

Please remember that there are some people, no matter what you tell them, will think their own Grandmother is gaffed. It reminds me of the old farmer who saw a photo of the CN tower in Toronto and he said "I see it and I don't believe it". So his daughter brings him to Toronto and shows it to him, and the old farmer says..."I see it, but I still don't believe it"

Some people are just like that...for anything. From the sound of things, you know what you are doing with this effect. Forget about the skeptics, take Mr. Cram's advice and just do your thing, brother...as best you can.

~Rick~
jasper
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I have had people go white in the face and beg me to tell them it was a fake fork, even when it was there own!
Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
--Albert Einstein
Alan Munro
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Some people will say anything to keep from appearing stupid, yet, unbeknownst to them, they already look stupid to other people.
Hypnotic Winter
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I find letting them keep a twisted spoon or fork works great.

H.W
When your only reality is an illusion, then illusion is reality.
Samuel Catoe
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Listen to Scott. If you make any to do about getting the silverware back, there exists a reason to believe the silverware is faked. If they get to keep it the reasoning is "If he needed this fork he wouldn't let me keep it. Would he?"
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ashah
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Thanks guys. Actually, I have been giving my volunteer the silverware to keep, but I was concerned about the rest of the audience, who did not get a chance to look at them.

But it occurred to me after reading these posts that even the *fact* that I handed out the silverware to be kept and examined should convince everyone. I think I'm probably doing a good job after all.

Quote:
I have had people go white in the face and beg me to tell them it was a fake fork, even when it was there own!


Hahaha. Smile
themagicofjoseph
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I have been doing metal bending in my tablehopping for about nine months now and you will have these reactions because people are not "wired" the same. I buy forks 6 dozen at a clip at the local Maines and even show them the box right from the store and some still think it is fake. I've been using "Liquid Metal and "The Closer", but learned some great subtilties for Banachek's PSI 4 DVD. One example, When doing Liquid Metal, I no longer place the fork in a spectators hand and twist the fork in their hand, instead, They hold it tight and turn their hand over, now, whith hand passes and some acting and by suggestion you get them to "FEEL" it twisting in their hand, when this happens, ask them to discribe what they are feeling to everyone; this is strong because the spectator is discribing it and your hands were not on it at all.
Banacheks DVD is a must have! He also goes over bending of nails (small and Large), keys (bending on the spot when asked and no bender with you), nice fork routines and some spoons. But it is the "Mental" part that he teaches that is priceless.
I reciently added Banacheks "Psycokinetic Time" to my closeup, this is by far the best on the spot effect. You have nothing on you so you borrow a spectators watch, show them the time and place it in their hand to hold, they pick a time, and their own watch has moved! Alittle off track here but nice info.
Magically,
Joseph
Wolflock
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I must agree with Banachek's stuff. It is what I learned from and have had endless fun with it. I also agree with the others to let the spec have the fork to keep. I think Rick hit the nail on the head. Some people will still believe what they want to believe, even if they were the maker of the fork.

Regards
Wolflock
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smartie_28
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I just got PK Silverware and with the silverware I'm using I'm having a hard time getting the twist down. I think I'll go to wal-mart as many have said in other posts and try it on some of their forks. Does any one else have any tips in presentaion for the twist?
Ken Dyne
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Just an idea, I have never tried it but it just shot into my head:

Why not present the fork as something special, like a fork from another galaxy that has supernatural powrs, thus they will not need to ask if its a "special fork" as you have clearly stated that it is from the outset. AT the end let them keep the alien fork?

Juts another way or turning a disadvantage into an advantage I may well give it a go.

Best,
Kennedy
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Drewmcadam
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Quote:
On 2005-06-21 18:06, smartie_28 wrote:
Does any one else have any tips in presentaion for the twist?


Oh, yes! This is going to be a bit hard to describe, but I hope you’ll get the idea.

I demonstrate that it IS possible, using brute force, to bend a spoon (A grunt and an exaggerated strain). “It can be done just using simple physical strength. And it’s also possible (grunt-strain as I put the twist in it) to straighten it out again.”

That’s right, I do it right under their noses.

I then casually toss the spoon back and forth from hand to hand, in open view (try it, nobody suspects there is already a twist in it, so they’re not looking. And even if they were, they’re not going to see the twist!) as I select my participant and ask them if they’re left or right handed. I then ask them to hold out their left hand, palm down. I place the bowl of the spoon – and the twisted section - into their hand and get them to make a fist.

“Now, hold it loosely enough to let it turn. With the bowl in their hand, and the handle sticking out, I stroke the handle a few times then wrap my hand around the handle and start to turn it several times. “Can you feel that turning in your hand?” Of course, they can. I then make the movement, exactly as though I were turning the handle – but I don’t! The result is that the participant thinks I’m twisting the handle, but they can’t feel the movement. (In an excited voice): “Did you feel that?” In the majority of occasions, they yell out. If not, I just do it again.

It’s amazing how often people say: “The handle is turning, but the bowl isn’t... it’s gone soft!”

I continue: “As I said, you CAN bend a spoon using physical strength... But you’d need (indicate that the participant should open their hand) a vice... (withdraw the spoon) and a pair of pliers (point to the twist) to straighten THAT up. Try it, it can’t be done.”

And they WILL try it!

(Occasionally, some smart-alec will ask if you can straighten it up again. There are two possible answers: (1) Yes, but it just snaps. Or (2) Why, what do you need straightened?) Your reply depends on how vindictive you feel!

Best wishes,

Drew McAdam
skc417
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That is an awesome way to present the twist Drew !
I never really liked banacheks handling for it, too much is covered in the performer's hands. But your handling just solved all the problems, it's happening in their hands and you have also prepared the bend while explaning how you can physically bend it. Pure Genius!

Simon
durgy
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Nothing new to add...but I also use liquid metal... it's done wonders for me

and somene mentioned the cn tower in Toronto.... I work there... Smile

(Last summer I actually performed magic there)

Durgy
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rumburak
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Drew, that sounds like a very good routine. Like Simon said before, you work right under their nose and lead them where you want them!

However, you must have an excellent performance and misdirection for that, I suspect it to be more difficult to present right than the Banachek way (which does not mean that that was easy in the first place).
Richard Osterlind
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My method of working is as follows. I always bring some silverware with me and, of course, let them keep the bent silverware. If you make the bend look like you are really doing it with your mind (instead of a magic trick) they very rarely will suspect a gimmick. (I have seen many magicians bend a spoon in the same way they do the cups and balls!) When they occassionaly DO think it is a trick spoon, I relish it! I challenge them get me a spoon or fork themselves and then I bend it with great flair! NOw it becomes a challenge effect and, like I have written on the Café elsewhere, you have some drama!

As for the twist, I bend the spoon a number of times until it is almost bent over. Then I say, "I don't want to use up every spoon in the place, so let me straighten this one out." I put the twist in as I do that. Then I finish.

Richard
Tom DV
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When doing table work, how do you manage to carry around many spoons/forks?

Do you just have a few in your pocket and perform a couple of times, or do you have many somewhere and perform many times?

Please let me know as I am very interested to know,
thanks alot, Tom.
Richard Osterlind
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Tom,

I don't know if that question were addressed to me or just in general. As for me, I do carry about 4 spoons in one of my pockets. Mind you, I don't bend spoons for every person I meet. I think the effect is so strong that it should be used sparingly, especially if you are apparently putting in mind-draining effort to do it.

As long as I am on that point, let me offer this bit of personal advice I have found to be true. It is easy to fall into a "contant-performing" mode. That is, where you stand there doing one effect after another in a break neck fashion. I don't believe this is desirable. It tends to lessen the impact of your work and make it seem all too effortless. Instead, I try to talk in between. I take advantage of any questions asked me and try to carry on interesting conversation with the spectators. Sometimes I will let that build for awhile until people are almost begging me to do something else. Then it becomes special!

Richard
sjdavison
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I agree Richard - I personally feel too many effects make specific effects become blended together in a haze of 'having their mind read'. This reminds me of Paul Harris' writing in AOA, when he says 'to nurture as much astonishment as you can, then restart over again with another spark'. I think this is very true.

As an aside Richard after your point, out of curiosity, if someone asked you to perform and you only wanted to do three effects, which would you do?! I'd be interested to know - you have a lot out there! (my prediction - ooh, let's see - PCT, BCS effect, Miracle thought projection? Or am I way off?!!!!)

Simon
Simon, 32, UK



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