The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Best uk coins for palming? (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

pedrothegreat
View Profile
New user
Southampton - UK
50 Posts

Profile of pedrothegreat
Hi

I have just received Bobo's New modern coin magic book. I am very new to magic and have never done any coin magic before. Can anyone give me some advise on which are the best UK coins to use for palming (trying to learn the classic palm).

Also just an aside for anyone starting out in coin magic, I saw this link on another thread: http://www.coinvanish.com

It has a fantastic explanation of the technique used for the classic palm in the foundations section. I highly recommend it! just need to work out which coin to use for practice.
pedrothegreat

Never underestimate the stupidity of the general public

don't have a magic website but i have a cool car styling website at www.autobulbsdirect.co.uk
Richard Evans
View Profile
Inner circle
1377 Posts

Profile of Richard Evans
Try and get hold of some old British Half Crowns (pre-deciamisation) - they're about the size of a US half dollar. 10p coins are about the size of a US quarter. This gives you some idea of roughly equivalent coin sizes in the UK.

Meanwhile, you could start by using 10p, 50p and £2 coins - they're all reasonable sizes.
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
jolyonjenkins
View Profile
Inner circle
United Kingdom
1156 Posts

Profile of jolyonjenkins
I don't think there's an ideal current British coin. 10ps are small and despite being milled I find them slippery little devils. £2 coins are milled (though somewhat finely) and are a good size, but they also have a high weight/surface area ratio (i.e they are thick). 2ps aren't too bad, IME. Of course it depends somewhat on the size of your hands.

Old English pennies are quite easy to get hold of, and are almost exactly the same size as American half dollars - which is the basis for several tricks.

Incidentally, as has been pointed out here, the picture in Bobo of the classic palm is somewhat misleading. Dan's site is better.
Jolyon Jenkins
ithomson
View Profile
Veteran user
330 Posts

Profile of ithomson
The theory for palming on Dan's site is worth its weight in gold. With his permission I used this material for a workshop I did for the YMC at The Magic Circle, and that was well received.

Talking about British coins, I think half crowns are probably the nicest ones to use, as already mentioned. However, the milling isn't as sharp as half dollars. Old pennies are fine for size, but have no milling, which doesn't help. So on the whole we're left with £2 coins. But I agree with rjenkins - there's no ideal UK coin to use.

I haven't worked with Euro coinage - any comments anyone?

Up to now I've used half dollars when I work. I have never been questioned as to why I don't use British currency (and this is over ten years of using them), I think because of my presentation. And the fact that they are not legal tender in the UK has the added bonus that there is less incentive for customers to pinch them (which has happened when I've used £2 coins).

So, in an attempt to answer your question - I'd suggest either half crowns or £2 coins to help learn the classic palm, but this does depend on your personal anatomy.

There are a number of threads here on the Café on this subject. A search could prove quite valuable to you.


Ian
warren
View Profile
Inner circle
uk
3338 Posts

Profile of warren
Another vote for£2 coins being the easiest to start with followed by 2p coins followed by 10p coins.
pedrothegreat
View Profile
New user
Southampton - UK
50 Posts

Profile of pedrothegreat
Hi Guys

Thankyou for your advise. I was using a 10p piece but have since concluded that it is a bit too slippery to use at this stage (as rjenkins pointed out). The 2p and £2 coins both seem ok but I prefer the weight of the 2p so I think I will stick to that for now.
However I think I will try and get hold of an old english penny as that seems to be the most popular. Can someone tell me the easiest way to get one? (excuse my ignorance if this is an obvious question!).
pedrothegreat

Never underestimate the stupidity of the general public

don't have a magic website but i have a cool car styling website at www.autobulbsdirect.co.uk
Richard Evans
View Profile
Inner circle
1377 Posts

Profile of Richard Evans
The other disadvantage of using British coins is that gaffs are slightly more difficult to find - and there's not such a good range of prices as for US coin gaffs. It's a pity, because one of the nice things about coin magic is that it uses an everyday object.

The 2 euro coin is very similar to a £2 coin, the rest of the Euro coins are pretty small. There seem to be a fair few gaffed coins available in Euros, though. Not much chance of anyone pinching a few Euros. I also think that from a point of interest for spectators (UK ones at least) that old British coins or US coins are more likely to arouse curiosity than Euros.

Best option is probably to find some half dollar coins in a local coin shop or on eBay. If you do, go for new-ish coins that still have nicely milled edges rather than anything more flash like the silver Walking Liberty halves.

Anyone know whether the Post Office has US coins in their currency exchange? If you take your passport, there is no handling fee, but don't know what the minimum amount you can exchange is. If you can do it that way you can get some dollar bills too.
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
Pekka
View Profile
Special user
Finland
560 Posts

Profile of Pekka
The only coin large enough for a somewhat nice palm is the €2 coin. But it is still rather small.
Richard Evans
View Profile
Inner circle
1377 Posts

Profile of Richard Evans
Quote:
On 2005-06-13 14:24, pedrothegreat wrote:
Can someone tell me the easiest way to get one? (excuse my ignorance if this is an obvious question!).


The best place is to have a rummage round junk shops/antique shops. Old coins are usually to be found in old biscuit tins full of odds & ends.

Richard
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
Jonathan Townsend
View Profile
Eternal Order
Ossining, NY
27157 Posts

Profile of Jonathan Townsend
Quote:
On 2005-06-12 18:44, pedrothegreat wrote:...I have just received Bobo's New modern coin magic book. I am very new to magic and have never done any coin magic before. Can anyone give me some advise on which are the best UK coins to use for palming (trying to learn the classic palm)....


You might be off to a start on the wrong foot there. If you READ the routines in Bobo's, most of them are about BORROWING a coin. You lose a lot when you lose that part of the routine. Look around in the book for concealments that work with the real money you have on hand. Try to keep in mind that the sleights were invented to use the coins that were MONEY at the time. Stay current and use what works with the money you have onhand.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Chris "linkster" Watson
View Profile
Special user
England
564 Posts

Profile of Chris
£2 and 50p coins are perfect for coin magic in my opinion, if you contact KB Magic, keith has a variety of gaffed coins which include £2 S**LL, FL***ER, CIGARETTE TH***GH, etc. 50p offers F***ing coin and Melt.

I often perform a Hopping Halves and Spellbound with these coins...works fine for me.
RiffClown
View Profile
Inner circle
Yorktown, Virginia (Previously Germany)
1579 Posts

Profile of RiffClown
Quote:
On 2005-06-13 04:22, rjenkins wrote:

Old English pennies are quite easy to get hold of, and are almost exactly the same size as American half dollars - which is the basis for several tricks.



That's what I use.
Rob "Riff, the Magical Clown" Eubank aka RiffClown
<BR>http://www.riffclown.com
<BR>Magic is not the method, but the presentation.
info2victor
View Profile
Veteran user
337 Posts

Profile of info2victor
Whether using a borrowed coin has always be a struggle for me. Surely using a borrowed object to perform would be more amazing cause everyone knows it's a normal coin.

But sometimes when you want to perform coin tricks with gimmicks you are very often forced to use US dollors. The thing is when you want to do a few tricks in a row and a couple of them require gimmicks, it's quite strange to suddenly swtich from coins of your hometown to US dollars (given you are not using US currency).

To me it's better to start of with normal US dollars, let them examine, and switch to whatever gimmicks afterward.

Of course you can always try to do a routine with normal coins of any currency given it doesn't use any gimmicks at all.

Like above, English pennies are good choice since they are of the same size of US halves, so getting used to English pennies will make you automatically used to US halves. And usually the size suits for palming. Apart from usual coin shops, you can try magic props websites like
http://www.themagicwarehouse.com
It only takes a minute to learn how it is done, but takes a lifetime to learn how to do it.

You've got a coin?
murdo
View Profile
New user
4 Posts

Profile of murdo
Not so good for fakes nowadays, but the old 10p piece, (same size as the £2) was always quite good for me. Since all my coin boxes are that size I've hung onto my stock. They're still recognisable for many people, they are an obvious reason why you're not borrowing, they're not 'foreign' , and you can probably find them very easily in coin or junk shops. Half crowns are also incredibly easy to get hold of, at least round here.

Mind you I spent my coin unique, so I'm a bit stuffed on that one Smile Anyone got an old 10p/2p they want to get rid of ?
pedrothegreat
View Profile
New user
Southampton - UK
50 Posts

Profile of pedrothegreat
Cheers for all your advice everyone. I have been practicing the move quite a lot recently and while I'm still not perfect, I am really getting the hang of it. I have tried it with almost all variations of UK coins and a few European coins. The best one for me in terms of easy manipulation and natural concealment seems to be the 2p coin. Even though it doesn't have a milled edge, I seem to be able to grip it better. Hopefully with more practice with the technique I will be good enough to adapt to different coin sizes to accomodate available coin gaffs.

I think having a variety of tricks that can be performed with different size coins is a good thing. That way if you ask to borrow a coin it doesn't matter so much if you don't get the coin you wanted. I agree with Jonathan that using a borrowed coin is much more powerful but my power of suggestion is not quite there yet, a good fall back is always useful Smile

I will be looking into getting a variety of different coins and gaffs. That way I can cover all the bases whatever coin they give me.
pedrothegreat

Never underestimate the stupidity of the general public

don't have a magic website but i have a cool car styling website at www.autobulbsdirect.co.uk
Count Zapik
View Profile
Regular user
UK
186 Posts

Profile of Count Zapik
Jonathans advice about using current money is ideal, and most easy to apply when doing mentalism I suspect.
...but for doing magic there are few coins in circulation that are as versatile as one would like for particular moves.

It may seem freeky introducing and using odd unfamilair coins to an audience; or more likely to magicians I suspect. However it can be done and can be made to be a 'feature'.
Maybe spending a moment handing out unusual & interesting coins for examination beforehand is a good ploy....it seems to work okay for me.

In any event I suspect its a good idea to perform with coins you are very familiar with, especially if performing skilled moves which need to be perfectly executed.

Also my sensibilities lead me to want to work with the largest and most visual coins I can in every situation. A dollar size coin seems ideal.

UK coins, indeed most modern coins are not as dynamic or as visually interesting as coins from previous times it seems to me. Modern coins often look more like tokens; in the days before plastic they had real Money Smile

Count Zapiko
I feel as if I have been whisked here from another life....it may even have been my own!
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Best uk coins for palming? (1 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2021 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.19 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL