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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Keeping press articles in good condition (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

magicman02
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I have been receiving a lot of press lately from my local media in newspapers and magazines. I have gotten copies of them, but I was wondering how do I keep them so that they will remain in good conditions for years to come so I can use them in my press packet. Do I clip the articles and put them in a photo album?
Lyndel
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Over time they will still yellow if placed into photo albums unprotected.

I have articles laminated to protect them. My local library has a laminating machine that can laminate large format items (even an entire sheet of newsprint if neccessary!) By laminating them, it keeps away air which is a newspapers natural enemy.

If using them for press packets, you may also wish to scan them in or have them scanned into a digital format so that you can print out a nice clean copy a year, five years, or fifty years from now.

Lyndel
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magicman02
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If I laminate them can I still use that laminated piece to make copies for press packets.
Lyndel
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Sure, I don't think you're going to get too much of a glare if you photo copy or scan a laminated newspaper article.

But, if you're worried about that, just scan them before having them laminated.


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LostSoul
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I'd go with scanning them in before you laminated them (You might be able to get an online version already which will save scanning).

Dave
icentertainment
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And also get serveral copies of each newspaper
LostSoul
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One thing that wasn't mentioned when scanning or lamenting…

Make sure you get the publication name and date. After a time, you’ll want to get rid of the date and just use it as testimonial, after all a piece written 3 years ago is pretty meaningless now (at least in my opinion).

Dave
Lyndel
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Quote:
On 2005-11-28 10:34, LostSoul wrote:
One thing that wasn't mentioned when scanning or lamenting…

Make sure you get the publication name and date. After a time, you’ll want to get rid of the date and just use it as testimonial, after all a piece written 3 years ago is pretty meaningless now (at least in my opinion).

Dave



Good advice Dave!

I'll use the article with the date for about a year and then use the same article sans the date for marketing when the article is no longer considered "current."


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Starrpower
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I prefer to photocopy them. My experience has been that photocopies don't yellow as readily as newsprint -- if at all. I have laminated copies of the original news pieces, and they *still* yellow after time.

The only problem with scanning is that it creates a moire pattern with any phtos, because you are making a screen (or "dotted pattern") out of something that's already been screened. There are ways to reduce (if not eliminate) moire, but be aware of the problem.

And I agree with Dave; once stories are so old as to yellow they have very little promotional value, but are rather nice keepsakes and historical records of your career.

As for how I keep them, I do a little of everything: I have electronic files, but mostly I keep stuff in either a photo album or in file folders. I have a few items that are very large, like full-page stories from broadsheets, that I just have folded up on a bookshelf (I don't know what else to do with 'em!) Some very special items, like a cover story from a magic mag, is framed and hanging on the wall.
magic4u02
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I also go the route of scanning in the article. I also make sure I have the main masthead scanned as well as the date. I then can combine these to make a very nice 8.5 by 11 page that will work nicely inside of my promo kit and is not awkward for anyone to send to.

Then I can make a PDF file of this for use to sending out to prospects. I also can make this into a JPG file to use on my website if I choose to.

Kyle
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Starrpower
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What's a good (easy!) program for doing the pdf thing?
Mercury52
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Many scanners now come with included software to create a PDF. My father bought a new Canon model a couple months back that has one tocuh for e-mail, scan, copy, pdf, etc. It was very simple to use.

Kevin
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David Bilan
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Acid in newsprint is what yellows the paper (along with exposure to air). Scanning is the way to go. As to morie, ask the newspaper if you can get a print (or digital file) of any photo. I was shocked when the paper asked for $27 per print, but looked at it as a business expense.
Yes, I am a magician. No I did not make my hare (hair) disappear... it just took early retirement.
magic4u02
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Star: The best and only program to really do good PDFs is Adobe Acrobat. It is the industry standard for doing PDF creation. Some other programs have the optiuon to save your file as a PDF and that works as well, but Adove Acrobat will allow you to make a PDF file of just about anything and also allow you to edit and manipulate the file also. Hope this helps.

Kyle
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Bill Douglas
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I can tell you from my experience as a comic book collecter that newspaper and any pulp media will yellow with age and from exposure to light. Very low and very high humidity can contribute also.
I suggest getting your clips into mylar comic bags or protectors and putting some sort of buffering material in with them.

Go to your local comic shop and ask them for storage tools. A good shop will sell mylar bags and buffered backing bords to preserve comic books. A web serch for comic book storage will probably help you along.

Oh and besides the other advise on converting stuff to digital media remember libraries store newspapers and put them on micro film.
magicman02
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I got all my newspapers articles that have been written about me in the last couple months, (which has been a dozen or so, really working the press!) laminated. But my question now is that I am getting a new website soon and I want to have the press articles in their entirely on my new website. Can I still do this, since I got the laminated? Do all I have to do is get them scan?
magic4u02
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Well you can scan them laminated but it will not be easy. It really comes down to how good they were laminated. The scanning bed uses a light to get the best scan possible. The problem is that the light reflects off of the laminant and ends up in a scan with what we call hot spots or flashes.

Another problem with scanning in newspaper articles is the fact that newspapers use a line screen and dot resolution that is much less then the standard 300 dpi used in offset printing. The reason for this is because they are printing on newsprint paper. This paper absorbs ink a lot and so the ink spreads as it goes down on the paper. To adjust for this, they use less resolution and use screens in the seperation of the photo images.

In laymens terms what happens when you scan it is that you tend to get a moire pattern in any area where there was a photo. The scanner picks up this pattern and it tends to look pretty bad.

Bottom line is you will have problems scanning in regular newspaper articles and will have additional problems if they are laminated. It can be done, but requires someone adjusting the scanner settings before the scan process begins. You would then probably have to go into a photo editing software application like Photoshop to edit and adjust the image even more to get it where it needs to be.

I have done this a lot over the years and there is a learning curve for doing it. It can be done, but it takes some time and testing on your scanner to get it right. You could try it yourself, or you might want to have a service scan it for you and get it the best they can.

Another option is to call the paper and see if they may have any back orders of them in stock or even the actual photos. This is a long shot as most placeds recycle the papers and reuse the paper stock, but it might be worth trying out first.

I hope this helps a little bit. Let me know if I can answer any other questions for you.

Kyle
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