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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Coin lathe question (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

acmp
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Nottinghamshire
466 Posts

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Hi,

I'm looking into getting a small lathe for coin gaffs, nothing too serious, just a little something to adjust a few coins for my own amusement.

I was wondering if a watchmakers lathe (manual type) is suitable or if I need to go a bit more upmarket and get a powered hobby type lathe?

Any comments from those with experience is welcomed.
acmp<><

"Well if I had one wish in this god forsaken world, kids
It'd be that your mistakes would be your own"
FilipinoFreak
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I've never done any coin gaffs myself, but I do own a Taig Micro Lathe. Do a Google search and you'll find a dealer for whatever country you're in. Micro lathes are fairly affordable, but they are small. Not as small as a watchmakers lathe, but small compared to a mini lathe. A word of caution: All the accesories and tools that you will need to buy in order to use a lathe effectively will cost just as much or more than what you paid for the lathe itself. It's just a fact that owning any machine tool is expensive and time consuming. But the satisfaction you get out of creating precision items using your own hands is very gratifying.
acmp
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Elite user
Nottinghamshire
466 Posts

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Thanks FilipinoFreak, I'll get googling on that.
acmp<><

"Well if I had one wish in this god forsaken world, kids
It'd be that your mistakes would be your own"
bloodyjack
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Seattle WA
343 Posts

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I use a taig for coin work the 3 jaw chuck comes with aluminum soft jaws. I just machined a recess for the half dollar to fit in right in the soft jaws.
It's a shame you can only attach such small files.

Click here to view attached image.
"sir i sent you half the kidne i took from one woman prasarved it for you tother piece i fried and ate it was very nise i may send you the bloody knif that took it out if you only wate a whil longer"
acmp
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Nottinghamshire
466 Posts

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Nice picture Jack. I'm going to start sweet-talking my wife to see if I can get one of these micro lathes.

Any secondhand lathes in the UK?
acmp<><

"Well if I had one wish in this god forsaken world, kids
It'd be that your mistakes would be your own"
Leland Stone
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Inner circle
1204 Posts

Profile of Leland Stone
Nice! How about a lame follow-up question:

Can one of those three-jaw chucks be adapted to a small pen turning lathe used by woodworkers? I bought a ShopFox mini-lathe -- nice gadget, good for guys like me that dabble in turning. However, such an adaptation would greatly increase my appreciation for this tool.

Possible? Advisable? Thanks!
RiserMagic
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Guys;
Here's the setup I made for my classic watchmakers lathe:
http://www.jamesriser.com/Machinery/WWSmall/LatheSetup.html
I will often prototype coin work on this lathe. For production work I prefer my Elgin lathe (much more powerful). The watchmakers lathe is just too slow for production - but great for one-of-a-kind items and ultra small parts.

A three jaw chuck for the Taig comes with 3/4" - 16 tpi mounting. Is your Fox mini lathe a 1" - 8 tpi? If it is 3/4" - 16 tpi like my Record mini wood lathe, the chuck will screw right onto the spindle. Taig might also provide a plate to fit 1" - 8 tpi (a common size for larger wood lathes). Also adaptors are available.

For coin work you will need a slide rest (see several on the web site above). They come standard with a Taig, old Unimat, and Sherline; but cost like the devil for a watchmakers lathe.
Jim
Dave Fiscus
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Profile of Dave Fiscus
Jim, Your jeweler's lathe, and accesories look great. This and pictures of your tools you've previously posted show your workshop so clean. I'm jealous! What is the dial on the cabinet underneath?
FilipinoFreak
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I'm guessing the dial is a speed control for the motor. Wow, I wish my work area could be that clean and organized. I'm suddenly inspired to experiment with simple coin modifications. Too bad I don't do any coin work Smile
RiserMagic
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Dave;
The dial is for the solid state speed control mounted in the heavy hardwood base. BTW - there is fully braced 1/2" baltic birch ply under the stainless steel tray for support and to eliminate vibration.

That part of the shop is clean right now. The rest of the shop is a disaster. I've been way too busy to clean things lately! Things have a way of accumulating around you as you work.
Jim
Leland Stone
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Inner circle
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Hi, Jim:

Thanks for the very informative heads-up; it's convinced me that my wood-turning dabbling probably won't translate well to metal-turning dabbling without a more serious investment in both tooling and training.

I think a good machine shop training program is in order before proceeding.
acmp
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Elite user
Nottinghamshire
466 Posts

Profile of acmp
That's one sweet setup Jim!

I'm only after a dablers kit, but now I want one like yours Smile
acmp<><

"Well if I had one wish in this god forsaken world, kids
It'd be that your mistakes would be your own"
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