The Magic Caf
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The clothes we wear » » Had to laugh (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
nucinud
View Profile
Inner circle
New York, New York
1298 Posts

Profile of nucinud
I did a birthday party last night. The mother of the birthday child looked amazed when I walked in. She said "Wow you are wearing a magician's costume".

I was just wearing a normal tuxedo. She told me she had seen magicains at other parties and did they not dress this way.
"We are what we pretend to be" Kurt Vonnegut, jr.



Now U C It Now U Don't

Harry Mandel

www.mandelmagic.com
RandyStewart
View Profile
Inner circle
Texas (USA)
1989 Posts

Profile of RandyStewart
For this reason performers shouldn't have to thank one another, but that client's reaction spoke volumes we caring performers won't, and I will, THANK YOU!

Thanks for perpetuating class and respect.
Maro Anglero
View Profile
Loyal user
FLORIDA
248 Posts

Profile of Maro Anglero
Nucinud

Same here, I too wear a tuxedo and the minute I put on the tux jacket they say to me WOW you even look like a magician. One time I did a birthday party that when I got in the door the mother started to cry and said to me "I will pay you $50 more if you put on this clown makeup" I first said "NO I am a Magician not a clown" she tells me I promised my daughter that the Magic Man was also a clown, to me it was funny that she had the clown makeup ready for me. Ok so the tears got to me and I put on the makeup and went to the back yard to do the show. well into the show I produce my first dove that the minute he took a good look at me he took off to the sunset, but I kept the show going and the second dove I made appear also did the same thing. Two weeks later the lady called me to let me know one dove came back to the house.
I did many back yard shows and never had a problem with my doves, but the makeup is what made it happen. That was 15 years ago and I have vow never to put clown makeup ever again.

Magically,

Maro
For the Magician: The hard must become habit, The habit must become easy, The easy must become Beautiful



Doug Henning
nucinud
View Profile
Inner circle
New York, New York
1298 Posts

Profile of nucinud
My friend Scott Interrante calls a tuxedo a magician's uniform.

I agree with Maro, my personality does not fit a clown character. I do lots of comedy, but I can't seem to behave like a clown. Even at a Halloween party, I told the lady who hired me, that I will not dress in a costume or make up, I will appear as a magician. That was good enough.
"We are what we pretend to be" Kurt Vonnegut, jr.



Now U C It Now U Don't

Harry Mandel

www.mandelmagic.com
Paolo Venturini
View Profile
Veteran user
Lucca (I.) - New York City
385 Posts

Profile of Paolo Venturini
Your sentence's signature you wrote say it all!!

Paolo Venturini
Caveat Lector
View Profile
Elite user
493 Posts

Profile of Caveat Lector
You should wear what fits your personality, not something that people think you should wear. I could never pull off the tux look, it just is not me at all. But if your clients are happy then you have done your job. If we were to actually wear "real" magicans clothing we would all still be in robes with pointy hats. Times change and so do trends, play to your audience and your demographic.
Corrupting the art of magic, one show at a time
www.underworldent.com
www.myspace.com/johnshawcomedymagic
nucinud
View Profile
Inner circle
New York, New York
1298 Posts

Profile of nucinud
At corporate events I some times forgo the tux and wear a suit.
But I feel as a performer you should stand out in the crowd. It is important to look professional and slightly different from the guests.
I know magicians that don't own a tux, but wear black pants, white shirt and a black vest, no tie. It works. As Randy said, class and respect.

What do you wear Lector and what type of audience do you entertain?
"We are what we pretend to be" Kurt Vonnegut, jr.



Now U C It Now U Don't

Harry Mandel

www.mandelmagic.com
RandyStewart
View Profile
Inner circle
Texas (USA)
1989 Posts

Profile of RandyStewart
Believe me when I say that I'm very tolerant of performance styles. When you take the performer's personality, character, story line, and overall intended effect, styles other than black/white tie are in order and appropriate.

However, for my style of magic in stage manipulation, formal wear compliments the act. I can't imagine anyone doing a similar act in street clothes.

Furthermore, I dress in a frock style coat tuxedo, wing tip shirt, and black four in hand tie, as a celebration of my own act. No, I'm not being full of myself when I say that I dress formally, when performing, as a celebration of the act and the audience - both of which are very special to me and merit all the attention to detail and respect, from me, the performer. And no one will ever change my mind on the matter.

Dressing in that manner is hardly a chore for me - it's simply my pleasure.
nucinud
View Profile
Inner circle
New York, New York
1298 Posts

Profile of nucinud
Getting my props together and dressing for the show, to me, is like a samurai getting ready for the battle. It is a ritual that pumps me up to do the performance.
"We are what we pretend to be" Kurt Vonnegut, jr.



Now U C It Now U Don't

Harry Mandel

www.mandelmagic.com
Bob Sanders
View Profile
Grammar Supervisor
Magic Valley Ranch, Clanton, Alabama
20534 Posts

Profile of Bob Sanders
Costume has a lot to do with audience expectation. You don't get a second chance to make a first impression. If you show up for the show looking like the parking lot attendant, expect to be treated that way. Expect your show to be valued at that level too. What the audience sees a parking lot attendant pretending to be a magician!

Tux is not the only way to fly. However, it is certainly a good one. The costume needs to fit the event and the audience expectation. White tie and black tie are not always appropriate. Most of my stage shows are in those but business suits are used as well as the old standby: the blue blazer and slacks. I am not a tee-shirt magician.

It is also a matter of respecting the talent buyer, the talent buyer's image, and the talent buyer's guests. We are employees, not honored guests to please our egos. Our real job is to make the talent buyer look good.

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Bob Sanders

Magic By Sander / The Amazed Wiz

AmazedWiz@Yahoo.com
Caveat Lector
View Profile
Elite user
493 Posts

Profile of Caveat Lector
I second all your opinions, you should either be the best dressed person in the room or the strangest dressed person in the room. Either way you must command the attention and let people know that "you" are the magician.
Corrupting the art of magic, one show at a time
www.underworldent.com
www.myspace.com/johnshawcomedymagic
JackScratch
View Profile
Inner circle
2151 Posts

Profile of JackScratch
A magician, "The Magician" was Bill Bixby (RIP)
Bill Nuvo
View Profile
Inner circle
3094 Posts or
2747 Posts

Profile of Bill Nuvo
I don't wear a tux. It doesn't suit my style. I am very clownish in nature.

I can't I totally agree with wearing a style because a talent buyer wants you to, because that is what is expected. That's letting them control your personna and routines.

The key is to give them something beyond what they expected. That is our job.
JackScratch
View Profile
Inner circle
2151 Posts

Profile of JackScratch
Quote:
On 2006-01-17 15:59, mrbilldentertainer wrote:
I don't wear a tux. It doesn't suit my style. I am very clownish in nature.

I can't I totally agree with wearing a style because a talent buyer wants you to, because that is what is expected. That's letting them control your personna and routines.

The key is to give them something beyond what they expected. That is our job.


I disagree on two levels. On one level I disagree as to what our job is. Our job is to entertain our audience as well as we are able. As a magician I will add, "using magic." to that.

On another level, I disagree because as a businessman, offering a potential client desired options will allow you to accomplish the first level. You should be in control of the character you create, you should simply be able to create characters on demand. I know this talent has served me well on more than one occasion.
Bill Nuvo
View Profile
Inner circle
3094 Posts or
2747 Posts

Profile of Bill Nuvo
Oh I agree that being versatile is a great attribute. As I do a lot of stuff in the entertaining business (magician, juggler, telegrams, DJ...). Within the context of this thread, you can end up trying to please too many people and creating characters on demand may create a lesser product. Not saying it's impossible. I have done it. You obviously have. I just would rather have an established personna/character.

As for the other part. Don't you want to exceed their expectations? Makes more business "cents" to me.

For more on character development, check these two threads
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=27
and
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......7&15
JackScratch
View Profile
Inner circle
2151 Posts

Profile of JackScratch
Quote:
On 2006-01-17 17:25, mrbilldentertainer wrote:
As for the other part. Don't you want to exceed their expectations? Makes more business "cents" to me.

I want to entertain them as well as I am able. I want the best of my abilities to excede there expectations. The problem with most magic jobs is that you are serving two masters. You are hired by someone, the office manager, homeowner, host, whatever. Certainly, if you do not provide the service they wish you to, you will either not get the job in the first place, or not get rehired if you fail to deliver on your word. The person who hires you, does so for an event, at which there will be people you are being hired to entertain. Again, fail to do so and suffer like results. Obviously, the more you entertain the audience, the better off you are, however, promise a tux and show up in a clown suit and it wont matter how entertaining you were, and refuse to wear a tux and you may not get the oportunity to entertain beyond expectations.
Bill Nuvo
View Profile
Inner circle
3094 Posts or
2747 Posts

Profile of Bill Nuvo
Yes of course, if you promise something you must deliver. And yes, I may not get some jobs becuase I don't wear a tux. But, those are few (that I know of) and they mostly happend to be birthday parties which I am weeding out for me. I give those to my employess.

But I must be doing something right. I am constantly getting rebooked (75% of my business is repeat) and the referals never seem to stop. People love my character. And I am working every week.

The tux works for some people and not for others. But you can't just put a tux on and say you're a magician, just like you can't put a typical clown costume on and call yourself a clown. You have to go beyond that. Which is I think where we can all agree. No matter what costuming you wear, it doesn't mean squat if you don't have the character or the ability to entertain.
JackScratch
View Profile
Inner circle
2151 Posts

Profile of JackScratch
Well mrbilldentertainer, you have clearly found your market, and that does not contradict my statement at all. You have simply found a market with requirements that do not include evening wear. All of that is great, however you are still meeting the requirements of your clientel, dresswise. Honestly, I have no problem with eveningwear, provides many much needed pockets. I do, however do a lot of character work. If a client has a request which denies my very valuable pockets, then I do my best to find a middle ground. I can not perform, to the best of my ability, without those pockets, so if no middle ground can be reached, then I will certainly refuse the job. That cenario doesn't arise often. The important point is to be able to meet you clients needs, only then may you have the oportunity to prove your abilities.
RandyStewart
View Profile
Inner circle
Texas (USA)
1989 Posts

Profile of RandyStewart
With so much varied opinion, this battle of the threads has been interesting. How about a new dress code? Every paid performer wearing a standard uniform. I don't know, it'll be something grey in color and perhaps a one piece outfit. It'll be easy on the eye, won't confuse the audience as they'll eventually associate it with such a performance. It'll stop the bickering among us and debate as to what clothes looks better, which is best suited for today's audience, which is outdated, which is really "with it", and perhaps force some to really exercise their creativity to set themselves apart. You know the sort of "uniformity" we have in the military or private schools. Seems to work there. Hehehehe.

As a child, I attended a private catholic school and a uniform was worn everyday. They spared us the adolescent and shallow value judgements based on whether we wore a $7 pair of sneakers or $115 dollar pair of Jordans. If you were to stand out in the crowd it came from within and didn't rely on the trappings of fashion or material trinkets. After all, we were there to learn and not sell each other or the world on who we were or what we could do using outerwear. Years later I never understood the pressures some public school children experience if they are not wearing certain shoes, clothes, or even colors! You've heard a couple of stories of inner city kids actually being killed for their sneakers! That blows my mind becaue as a child, when the uniform came off, I was quite happy in a pair of hand me down jeans and a white t-shirt - no problem! I'm still a t-shirt guy and always will be.

Of course many of those same kids will argue, for those of us not living in their world, that clothes makes them (whatever that supposed to be) and very possibly may keep them alive or get them killed. Or at the very least tell others in their immediate world who they are, who they want to be, and what they stand for.

Some of us, like myself, feel the same way about what we wear during a gig. Amazing as it may sound to some, ASSUMING YOU ARE GOOD, what is worn that day or evening may make or break many things that affect your act and where it goes in the future - if anywhere.

But given the choice between all magicians wearing a standard grey one piece uniform and the existing variety IE clowns, formal attire, street clothes, characters, business suits, and anything else coming our way, I'll take the latter!

The variety is awesome!
JackScratch
View Profile
Inner circle
2151 Posts

Profile of JackScratch
I wont dispute that Randy. Variety is a big part of any art. But then, are we not actors. Do we not affect our audience in much the same way that any other actor does? And is our costuming not almost as big a statement about who we are and what we do as any other factor? The interesting thing here is that for most of us, we are freelance actors. We perform at the behest of one client. I would never allow a client to demand that I do something which would reflect badly on my performance (well I would, but I could retire after they pay me for it.) However, assuming that whgat they request wouldn't actualy reflect badly on my work, I would be a fool not to comply with any request they made. Similarly, it is wise for me to be prepared to comply with the most common requests. All of that is just good business.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The clothes we wear » » Had to laugh (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2022 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.05 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL