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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Magic books and videos for beginners (10 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Eva
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I don't quite agree with Mike Rubinstein on one point...the David Stone tapes were the first magic tapes I owned, and I learned the basics from them.

Mike's Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights is a FANTASTIC resource if you want to put together your own routines, or change certain parts of existing routines.

Eva
"Believe it, or believe it not!" ~ Manuel Muerte

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Mano
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Eva,

I agree with you about the David Stone tapes; they were the first one I owned as well, and the one who put me in the world of coin magic almost five year ego, all the routines all practical and no table require;To my mind these two tapes are better than most of the one Michael mentioned, I have those he mentioned and I still prefer the David stone tapes.

My two centavos.

Mano.
pdrake99
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There are so many resources out there...but if you really get down to the nuts and bolts of beginning coin magic; any $5 book at the bookstore explains palming and fake transfers...and I'd be safe to bet that no one on here has mastered more than 2 or 3 routines directly (not from a tape) from Roth's Expert Coin Magic... a serious study...and difficult to read at times...BOBO is always going to be the only resource you'll ever need...I've made a living with about 5 coin sleights...sure I've experimented with a ton, but in the real world, you don't need more than a few...same with cards...use all of that extra time to work on presentation, not learning a million useless sleights just for the magic club. Good luck all...

patrickdrake.com
the fritz
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Hello all,

I'm new to the Café...this is my first post so I thought this topic would be a good place to start. My two cents for beginners: The Magic Book (Harry Lorayne-book), Mark Wilson's Course in Magic (Mark Wilson-book), and The Complete Introduction to Coin Magic (Michael Ammar-DVD). You could probably make a living using stuff from these three sources. Nice to meet you all.

Brett
Mb217
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You're very 1st Post, huh...Well, Welcome "the fritz" aka "Brett", Smile

There are so many great places to start...In book form, I don't think anything beats out Bobo's New Modern Coin Magic...Been reading back & forth through that thing for 20yrs at least. There are other great books I suppose, but Bobo's is definitely one of them, and the one probably owned by more magicians than any other, and probably for the best price too, about $5-8 bucks. Can't beat it!

As for dvd's, there's a lot of good ones to begin with and I have a few of them, but I happen to really got something out of Ammar's Complete Intro To Coin Magic. He packs quite a bit into that dvd. Also, of course the David Roth Intro dvds are all very good with good teaching and routines. *I would add the latest "New Modern Coin Magic" dvd set too. It's a 4 dvd set, about $40 bucks and presents visually well the stuff that's in Bobo's. So most of that stuff in Bobo's that you just can't visualize, here you have it very well presented, explained, demostrated, etc. It's a good accompaniment to the Bobo book, just a great all-around value.

I'd also say call upon some of the Café Members here about things, as they are a great resource about all things magical of the coin, etc. Specifically, reach out to the Godfather, VinsMagic here, as he is always willing to help. The guy doesn't just point and say "That-a-way," he actually shows you how with his amazing and unending creativity. He's a great guy and you can learn an awful lot from him, and few others maybe like him at the Café. Actually, no one else is quite like him or for that matter the Magis that make up his "La Famiglia." As you adventure here, you'll find out what I mean. Smile Anyway, just tell him "MB" sent'cha.

There's so much more out there and that's the journey of it all, but if you open with these suggestions, you'll be well on your way, with a lot of good practice of course. Smile Good luck and enjoy the journey. It's pretty wonderful. And again, Welcome to the Café. -MB Smile
*Check out my latest: MBs Morgan w/ BONUS: Destiny, Copper Silver INC, Double Trouble, FlySki, Crimp Change - REDUX!, and other fine magic at www.VinnyMarini.com Smile

"Believe in YOU, and you will see the greatest magic that ever was." -Mb Smile
the fritz
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Thanks for the welcome Mb217. Good call on the Bobo book. It's great.

Brett
GWSchott
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Magic is visual, and it can be difficult - especially for beginners - to translate written words on a page into properly executed routines. I know this from firsthand experience because I'm going through it right now. Without an accompanying video of some sort just reading Bobo's would have put me in a world of hurt. It would have been too easy for me to fall into bad habits without even knowing it. Just an opinion from the trenches.
Yours In Magic,
Gordon
sirbrad
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Yes, Modern Coin magic is by far the best DVD for the price and the amount of content you get.

"David Roth's Expert Coin Magic DVD Combo (1,2,3)" are great, as well as "Revolutionary Coin Magic by Jay Sankey." Then after you have honed your skills, you might want to get "David Roth's Ultimate Coin Magic Collection," which is indeed "ultimate."



"David Roth's Expert Coin Magic DVD Combo (1,2,3)"

Volume One-Basic Coin Magic

Personalized, detailed instruction from the greatest coin manipulator in the world. Here's everything you need to know to start on the wonderful road of coin magic! Volume One provides a solid working knowledge of the basics of sleight-of-hand with coins; and David then teaches you some of the greatest "classics of coin magic" ever created.

The Classic Palm
The Finger Palm
The Thumb Palm
Classic Palm Vanish
Finger Palm Vanish
Thumb Palm Vanish
Palm Finesses
Palm Transfers
Fingertip Rest Position
The Utility Switch
The Shuttle Pass
Loads & Productions
Coin Switches
Vanish & Reproduction
Winged Silver
Copper & Silver
Coin Change
Chink-a-Chink
French Drop & Variations
The Vernon Load
Ramsay Subtlety
L'Masque Load
Kaps Subtlety
Power of the Magic Wand
Benzais Friction Palm
The Bobo Switch

Volume Two-Basic to Intermediate Coin Magic

Now that you know the basics of expert coin magic, Volume Two furthers your schooling with intermediate sleights, moves, tips, subtleties, finesses and more classics of coin magic. David strives to impart all of his knowledge on each and every item, giving you the special tips and insights that took him decades to learn and devise.

The Retention Pass
The Click Pass
The Curl Palm
Hanging Coins
Multiple Coin Production
Wild Coin
Coins to Cup
Coin through Hand
Coins Through the Hole
Spellbound
One-Handed Spellbound Change

Volume Three-Intermediate to Advanced Coin Magic

After mastering the material David teaches on Volumes One and Two, you'll truly be able to call yourself a "coin man." You'll also be ready to learn still more advanced sleights and routines, including effects devised by some of the top coin magicians in the world. Together, all three volumes form a lifetime of valuable reference material to always be cherished.

The Cardini Steal
Metamorphosis Change
Advanced Chink-a-Chink
Milliken's Transposition
Tenkai Pennies
Silver/Copper Extraction
The Magical Filtration
One-Coin Routine
Advanced Copper & Silver
T.V. Surprise
Advanced Coins Through the Table
David Roth's Purse & Glass

You could then also look into "Michael Ammar's Easy To Master Money Miracles."

Also "Coin Magic Made Easy Roth"

Volume One-Basic Coin Magic
Personalized, detailed instruction from the greatest coin manipulator in the world. Here's everything you need to know to start on the wonderful road of coin magic! Volume One provides a solid working knowledge of the basics of sleight-of-hand with coins; and David then teaches you some of the greatest "classics of coin magic" ever created.

The Classic Palm
The Finger Palm
The Thumb Palm
Classic Palm Vanish
Finger Palm Vanish
Thumb Palm Vanish
Palm Finesses
Palm Transfers
Fingertip Rest Position
The Utility Switch
The Shuttle Pass
Loads & Productions
Coin Switches
Vanish & Reproduction
Winged Silver
Copper & Silver
Coin Change
Chink-a-Chink
French Drop & Variations
The Vernon Load
Ramsay Subtlety
L'Masque Load
Kaps Subtlety
Power of the Magic Wand
Benzais Friction Palm
The Bobo Switch

"The Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights 1,2,3" After all these, you should never want to see another coin again.
The great trouble with magicians is the fact that they believe when they have bought a certain trick or piece of apparatus, and know the method or procedure, that they are full-fledged mystifiers. -- Harry Houdini
WoodRat
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Just a thought on books vs videos...

I was fortunate when I began learning coin magic. I still had a local shop to visit. That's where I bought Bobo's "New Modern Coin Magic." I would read and learn and practice moves, then try them out at the shop. The shop was called "The Magic Touch" and it was run by a guy named Steve Dawson. I learned a lot by watching watching Steve demo various coin gaffs and effects and watching the other customers perform for each other.

These days, it's harder to find a local shop, so DVDs and tapes are definitely a great aid. As I started to think about routining I bought and watched David Roth's "expert Coin Magic series and Michael Ammar's "Easy to Master Money Miracles" These tapes did a lot to help cement the idea of presentation and timing in my mind. I eventually built a folding, 3-way mirror for practicing - something I think every coin worker should do.

Overall, I think videos are a great way to start, along with Bobo's book. Eventually, after you have some basic sleights learned, I think books again become the way to go. Much more bang for the buck..

Cheers,
WoodRat
Learn something new everyday.
aiturran
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I guess this is an old topic.
I started learning coin magic using Bobo's Modern Coin Magic, as most of you say it includes all the basic sleights and many more, and has very classic routines. It's an enciclopedia and a bible for the coin worker.
At the moment, I'm trying to improve more on coin magic, so I'm studying Roth's Expert Coin Magic Made Easy videos, learning the way David Roth does them (as I think is the most natural and flawless technically speaking of coin workers).
And adding that, I'm reading Expert Coin Magic from Kaufman, because I think books are the first source you should go when learning magic.

Videos should be used to see mostly the techniques and subtleties, which can help you in a routine.

That's my 2 pesos (as I'm in Chile)
Take care,
Antonio
football2136
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In the beginning there were coins is a good beginner video. the stuff is taught by jay noblezada. it is available at penguinmagic.com
CDKconjurations
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The DVD by Noblezada is very good. The quality and style of the videography should definitely catch and hold the attention of aspiring young magicians. I love books, but learning from them as a beginner can be challenging and the results discouraging. That is why I would recommend "In the Beginning there were Coins" to a younger newcomer to the field of coin magic.

I would also recommend Reed McClintock's "Classic Palming with Coins" DVD. In it, McClintock teaches a system for learning to classic palm several coins (and drop them out of the palm one-by-one as needed) which is different from anything I have seen or read.

My recommendations would, of course, also include those classics which have been mentioned for page after page, so I will not waste more space listing them yet again.
newbie2magic
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Figured I'd let people know of a place to get all these books and videos free. I already got Bobo, RRTCM, the Ammar videos, etc...for free. Not trying to get off easy but hey, when life gives you lemons... PM me if you would like to know how to get these videos and books.
mc_magi
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Quote:
On 2007-05-22 00:18, newbie2magic wrote:
Figured I'd let people know of a place to get all these books and videos free. I already got Bobo, RRTCM, the Ammar videos, etc...for free. Not trying to get off easy but hey, when life gives you lemons... PM me if you would like to know how to get these videos and books.


May I come into your house and take whatever I like because life game me lemons?

I didn't think so....
Fingers
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Those items you mentioned aren't free newbie2magic, they cost you your integrity. Personally I think its too much of a price to pay, I prefer to use cash.....
Where I go, so do my coins.....
t-aldehyde
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I began to study coin magic reading Shigeo Futagawa's Book.
(It's written in Japanese, but I heared English translated version was also published internationally. In above, MCUESTA and oldguy recommend it.)

When I began to read English magic book, I bought Bobo's "Modern Coin Magic" reprinted by Dover.

In comparing, Futagawa's book contains less routines and sleights than Bobo's.
But I feel this book is easily understandable because it describes basic sleights and routines in more detail with many pictures.
If its English version can be available still now, I strongly recommend it as the first book. (And I recommend Bobo's book as the second book should be read.)

He published another good Japanese coin magic book for beginners last year.
This consists of his serial lectures on Japanese Magic Magazine in a decade ago and several newly added lectures.

When I heared him, he doesn't have any plan to publishing English version, but it's very good book. (I hope someone to translate this some day in the future.)

By the way, about Bobo's "Modern Coin Magic", now I'm finding "New Modern Coin Magic". Does anyone knows the paperback edition from New Dawn Press (not Dover) on Dec 2004 is whether "New Modern Coin Magic" or not? (This edition is a little bit easy to purchase via Amazon Japan.)
http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Coin-Magic-......p;sr=1-1
Masayuki 't-aldehyde' Kozawa
http://t-aldehyde.legerde.main.jp/
(Japanese)
maiglesias
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I, too, began with Shigeo Futagawa's Book and found it to be a great place to start. The illustrations were very helpful. Ammar's introduction to coin magic has also been very helpful. I am going to look at David Stone's set next, since I really enjoy his other work.
Marcos Iglesias MD
Ryan_B_Magic
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Bobo modern coin magic is the best for coins I was really good at coin magic before I read that book now that I read it I am better
jbk2006
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Ok here's what I've found

In the begining there were coins(dvd)
Michael ammmar's complete introduction to money magic dvd's(1-3)
Jeff McBrides coin manipulation dvd
Michael Ammar's coin magic dvd
Modern coin magic dvd's(1-4)
Coin sleights by Michael rubenstein(4 I believe)
Knock out coin magic dvd by kranzo
Jay sankey's Rev. coin magic dvd
Gary Ouellet - Close Up Illusions book.

Those were the one's off the top of my head.

jbk
Expert coin magic dvd by david roth(1-3)
Ultimate coin magic dvd by david roth
Coin magic book by richard kaufman
Al Schinder on coins book
Bill tarr's now you see it now you don't book
JB BOBO's modern coin magic book
The amature magician's handbook by henry hay
Fastlife
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If you can find a copy, "The Stars of Magic" has excellent classic coin (and other) material. All of the tricks in this book have spawned countless variations. The coin material breaks down as follows (descriptions are from the book):

John Scarne's Silver And Copper Trick:
A silver coin in the spectator's hand changes place magically with a copper coin in the hand of the performer. This is followed by a beautiful penetration effect of the coin passing through the trousers pocket. For many years magicians were under the impression that Scarne used gimmicked coins. Now, Scarne shows that he does it with ordinary coins and gives you his exact method.

Dai Vernon's Spellbound:
Dai Vernon reveals a cherished routine which has been one of his pet mysteries for many years. The effect involves a series of remarkable and inexplicable changes of two coins of the same size but minted from different metals, such as a half dollar and an English penny. It utilizes a very old sleight originally employed by English swindlers at county fairs and carnivals. Until now this routine has been guarded, and consequently it is practically unknown to the magic fraternity. Although the effect appears extremely difficult to perform, its simplicity will intrigue you.

Dai Vernon's Kangaroo Coins:
This is Dai Vernon's original method of passing our coins, one at a time, through a table into a glass. The sleights utilized in this effect appear very natural and are easy to do. By adding superb misdirection and subtleties to natural movements, Dai Vernon has created a magnificent routine. After practicing and mastering this routine you will have an effect which will establish you as a superlative sleight-of-hand performer.

Francis Carlyle's Wrist Watch Steal:
The spectator puts an identifying mark on a copper and silver coin. One coin is placed in a handkerchief which is held by the spectator. The performer holds the other coin. At his command, the coin held by him vanishes and a resounding clink is heard. Mysteriously the performer's coin has joined the one in the handkerchief held by the spectator. Upon examination, the coins are found to be the ones originally marked by the spectator. This effect is an excellent one in and of itself. It impresses the spectator with your ability to do miracles with coins. Psychologically, this makes him easy prey for the main effect. Mr. Carlyle causes the spectator to believe he is going to see another coin trick which is even more impossible than the previous one. He is thus able to gain possession of the spectator's wrist watch without his knowledge. This is made easy because the spectator's mind is concerned solely upon seeing a coin miracle and he never suspects that his watch is to be stolen. The mechanics of the steal itself are simple, and are timed exactly to coincide with the distractions.

Slydini's Flyaway Coin Routine:
The performer shows a coin to a spectator and causes it to vanish. The spectator finds that the coin has traveled to his breast pocket. He thinks that he was caught by surprise and always requests the performer to repeat the effect. Although the spectator is on his guard, the performer successfully causes the coin to reappear four times in the spectator's pocket. This effect differs from other coin routines in that its dramatic strength lies in the repetition. By continually challenging the keenness of the spectator, the effect is greatly enhanced and built up into a bewildering and highly entertaining routine.

Slydini's The Art of Using the Lap as a Servante:
Tony Slydini has mystified hundreds of magicians by utilizing this stratagem and has literally "floored" them with apparently impossible effects. Of course he has developed his own style, perfected the misdirection and timing to such a degree that one can say that he has brought this system of deception up to a high artistic level. It took considerable persuasion to have him permit the publication of the fine details of lapping as interpreted by him in a new and modernized form.

Ross Bertram On Coins:
Rubdown: Performer places his right hand on a half-dollar and rubs it on the table with a circular motion. After a few moments the rubbing motion is stopped, the right hand is lifted, and the coin is gone. The left hand, which has been resting on the table, is then lifted, revealing the coin under it. Again the performer starts rubbing the half-dollar on the table with his right hand. Personally a dime makes its appearance from under the fingers in place of the half-dollar. Upon raising his left hand, he finds the missing forty cents under it--a quarter, a dime and a nickel.

Double-Cross: Two contrasting coins are shown at the fingertips--one in each hand. The hands are then closed and held far apart. When they are opened again, the coins are seen to have changed places. Performer offers to repeat the effect. This time, just before opening the hands, the left hand drops the coin it held originally to show nothing has happened as yet. Instead of the coins being transposed, which is what the spectators expect to see, the coin in the right hand has traveled over to join the coin in the left.

Passing The Half-Bucks: Four coins are counted slowly into the left hand. One coin is commanded to pass into the right hand. When the hands are opened, three coins are in the left hand and one in the right. This is repeated with the second and third coins. The performer then states that he will cause the fourth coin to join the three in the right hand; but something goes wrong and the coin fails to pass. When the right hand is opened, it is unexpectedly found to be empty and all four coins have surprisingly arrived in the left hand.

The Porous Paw: A coin is caused to penetrate the hand.

Coin Assembly: Four quarters and two playing cards are used. The coins are laid out in a square on a cloth covered table, about one foot apart. The two outer coins are covered with the cards. The two uncovered coins are vanished in succession, and join the quarter under the right-hand card. Finally, the coin under the left-hand card vanishes, leaving all four coins magically assembled under the right hand card.

Nate Leipzig's Pride:
The stack of coins was undoubtedly Nate Leipzig's favorite magical problem. He guarded it jealously, and would never perform it when other magicians were present. There was a good reason, for in his hands it was a masterpiece.

Max Malini's Favorite!:
Malini would ask a spectator to watch a coin as closely as possible as he tossed it from hand to hand. The coin landed head up in one hand, tail up in the other. This was done a few times, Malini asking the spectator to guess whether the coin was going to land head or rail. Finally he seemed to toss it into the left hand as the left hand closed on it. The spectator was asked which way the coin hand landed, head up or tail up. No matter what the answer was, Malini would open his left hand and reveal that the coin had completely vanished. The right hand was empty too. The effect in Malini's hands was that the coin melted away!

You can not go wrong with this book!
Sean-Dylan
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