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stoneunhinged
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Oh, and I have a Phil Keaggy story, which would serve as a counterpart to Arthur's lifestyle around the same era.

My best friend John and I were HUGE Keaggy fans, and he was playing somewhere in the Virginia Beach area, so we bought tickets for him and me and my girlfriend. To get permission I had to make an appointment with the Dean of Men at Liberty University (where I was studying at the time) to convince him that seeing Phil would be a spiritually uplifting and edifying experience which would justify leaving the campus with a girl in the car (!) and returning after curfew (!!).

Strangely enough, he gave me permission.

So we drove to the area (Suffolk, I think) and went to some high school auditorium, ran to get front-row seats (but only got third row), and watched Phil live.

There was a bit of a quiet moment, so my friend John yelled, "Hey, Phil, where's your middle finger?".

To this day, I sometimes yell, for no reason at all, "Hey, Phil, where's your middle finger?"

We got back to campus around 2:00 AM: John, my girlfriend and me. The security guards were very skeptical of our early morning threesome, but I showed the signed piece of paper from the dean and they let us in.

So for me the music was naughty and the lifestyle was not. For Arthur, the music wasn't very naughty, but the lifestyle...?
arthur stead
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Quote:
On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Again and again people say that no one ever changes their minds or learns anything in this forum.

Not true.

Arthur has taught me more about music than I can possibly repay.

Thanks, Arthur!



Thanks for the compliment, Stoneunhinged.
Arthur Stead
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I don't know how to do a double quote, so I'll just type this out:

Regarding Frampton's solo on While My Guitar Gently Weeps, Magnus commented: "Still not gently weeping, but neither is it screaming its woes into the night sky."

And Daryl said: "Peter's version is nice but I miss the slide guitar. I think slide lends itself better to the feel of the song and without it, it's just another lead."

I agree, Magnus and Daryl. There's nothing like a slide guitar to suggest that "weepy" feeling! To be fair, Peter's solos were different every time we played, and due to an argument we had just prior to the show, I don't think any of us played particularly well that night.
Arthur Stead
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Quote:
On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:

So for me the music was naughty and the lifestyle was not. For Arthur, the music wasn't very naughty, but the lifestyle...?


Haha, Stoneunhinged! Let's just say the lifestyle was surrealistic. Excess pushed beyond any limits. In truth, most of our shenanigans -- if done today -- would land us in prison. But back then we were encouraged to behave outrageously, and some of us took that to the extreme.
Arthur Stead
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On Jul 21, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Arthur, why does Peter switch to the LP Custom for the version of Gently Weeps? Could you tell us a bit about his taste for which-guitar-which-song? And what about yourself? Which-guitar-which-keyboard-which-song?


Wow, now you've opened up a can of worms! I hope replying to your questions won't seem too indulgent to other NVMS contributors. But here goes ...

For myself, I much preferred "the old days" in the 1980's when I had 5 keyboards onstage: Yamaha CP-80 Baby Grand Piano, Fender Rhodes electric piano, Hammond B-3 organ, Moog Prophet 5 and a Hohner Clavinet. For my more recent tours with Peter I used only one keyboard! A Korg Trinity Pro 88-Keys Workstation, for which I programmed specific settings for each song. To enhance those sounds, the keyboard was midi'd to a stack of rack-mount Roland, Yamaha and Korg sound modules. So by splitting the keyboard I could have piano on the lower range and organ on the higher range. Or by layering the keyboard and using a volume pedal, I could introduce strings beneath the acoustic or electric piano sound (e.g. Lines On My Face, Can't Take That Away, and Nassau, which is the brief instrumental introduction to Baby I Love Your Way).

When playing guitar, I always preferred my own Fender Telecaster (since 1981 an identical replacement for the original one that was lost in a plane crash). But for certain songs I also used some of Peter's Les Pauls (which I loved to play ... check out Black Hole Sun and I Don't Need No Doctor on the PBS Soundstage video), or his Martin 6-string acoustic and Ovation 12-string (the latter used in open tuning for Show Me The Way). However, during the 2005 - 2007 tour he liked me to use his white Telecaster for that song.

In all honesty, I really preferred it when we were a four-piece. I doubled on guitar more often, and it allowed for more musical spontaneity and communication between the musicians. But prior to the PBS special, we had just recorded the instrumental "Fingerprints" CD, which featured some other celebrity guitarists. So Peter wanted to add another guitarist, so we could perform some of the songs off that CD. I have nothing against the extra guitarist ... I just didn't like being shunted off to the side and playing less of a role in the band.

As regards Peter's taste in guitars, I never asked him why he preferred certain ones for certain songs. All I know is that his ever-evolving amplification and effects set-up took years to develop, and is an investment worth several million dollars. Every setting (i.e. delays, choruses, distortion, echoes, rotary, voice box, etc.) is pre-programmed and triggered from the multiple foot-button panel on the floor near his mike stand.
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stoneunhinged
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Wow. I mean, wow.

Thank you.

Your post is gold in my heart.
arthur stead
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Here's a great guitar solo by Deep Purple's Ritchie Blackmore on the song Child in Time (starts at about 3:30).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PfAWReBmxEs

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Gregor Von G.
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John Lennon's madman solo on "Yer Blues" from the Beatles "White Album"
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Marc Ribot's solo on Tow Waits "Jockey Full Of Bourbon" from the album "Raindogs",
The song is also in the first sequence of the fantastic Jim Jarmusch's movie "Down by Law"

I love the Ribot's style, a crooked mix of latin, surf, gipsy and jazz
stoneunhinged
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On Jul 22, 2015, Gregor Von G. wrote:

I love the Ribot's style, a crooked mix of latin, surf, gipsy and jazz


I, too, love Ribot.
stoneunhinged
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Here's one for Arthur.

First, the context: this is from a faculty talent show at Grove City College around 1991 or 1992. Me, the vice president of the college, and another professor (of business, I think; he's the one singing). The drummer and the bass player are sons. We got together and practiced a couple of times, then performed at the talent show.

I was around 30 years old and had never performed music in front of an audience.

So, the auditorium was packed--standing room only--with, I dunno, maybe 1500 or so. Mostly students. And we play a song, and then we start a version of Pretty Woman. (It's around the 3:10 or 3:15 mark). The crowd was enthusiastic. Anyway, I start a solo around 4:20 or so, and when the crowd realized I was actually playing a solo they went NUTS, and all of the hair on my legs and arms stood up, and there was this weird surge of electricity, and I couldn't hardly even play anymore because of the size of the rush. And I thought, "Is this what rock stars feel everyday?" It was like being God for thirty seconds. Indescribable.

For me, rock stars are indeed Gods. Naughty Gods, but Gods nonetheless.

Anyway, I'm embarrassed to post this. It is definitely NOT one of the best solos of all time. But it made the hair on my arms and legs stand up. At least when I played it. Smile

(I'm the skinny guy with the Strat)

arthur stead
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Very nice, Jeff! A lot better than most amateur bands I've heard out there!

Yes, that rush of adrenalin from playing live is intense. The incredible flow of energy to and from a live audience is visceral, and spurs your creativity and boosts your spirit to new heights. Plus, when you add the "naughty element" (for example pretty girls flashing their boobs), you are always inspired to kick it up another notch!
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Very nice, Jeff! A lot better than most amateur bands I've heard out there!

Yes, that rush of adrenalin from playing live is intense. The incredible flow of energy to and from a live audience is visceral, and spurs your creativity and boosts your spirit to new heights. Plus, when you add the "naughty element" (for example pretty girls flashing their boobs), you are always inspired to kick it up another notch!
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Very fun Jeff. Thanks for posting that.

Getting back to an earlier thought. I'm not sure if I'm the only one who's interested, but here goes.

I think everyone (or almost everyone) agrees that David Gilmour's solos on Comfortably Numb are brilliant, and form an integral part of the song. What happens to comfortably numb when you remove the solos? Is it even possible?

What if Roger Waters' vocals are performed by Dar Williams and Ani DiFranco?

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
Silvert0ne
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I love so much of the music posted already in this thread. I'd like to add a few more:

Frank Zappa - "What's New In Baltimore" from the 'Meets the Mothers of Prevention' album in 1984. The 3 minute long solo (after starting out all synth) is amazing. It's much more melodic than he usually played but it also has many of his signature techniques. It goes from blues to rock to gospel to who-knows-what beautifully.

Maggot Brain by P-Funk. So many great versions out there, probably one of the most covered solos since it's totally open to improvisation. (full disclosure: I have my own version, but it's not even in the top 1000).

Here's an obscure one from one of my favorite all-time guitar players - Mickey from Ween (aka Dean Ween). Skip to 2:30 if you just want the solo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0yIFWtFa8os
stoneunhinged
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I really enjoyed that, SilvertOne. Thanks.

Laurie (as ever) brought me down to earth for a moment.

I'm not gonna link to Scotty Moore. We should just bow our heads and pray.
arthur stead
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Check out the tasteful guitar playing by Larry Carlton on the track Layas by French composer Michel Colombier.

Larry plays a "visible" but supportive role underneath the melodic statement, then lays back for Michael Brecker's sax solo, before taking a solo of his own. His relaxed approach is really impressive, and I LOVE the way he lets one single note sustain and feed back for at least 4 bars before launching into his solo. Throughout, he never loses sight of the fundamental riff of the song, often "quoting" it in different ways and different ranges. I also really appreciate the way the solo begins slowly, gradually builds, gets crazy, and then tapers down at the conclusion.

By the way, that's Jaco Pastorius on bass, Steve Gadd on drums, and Herbie Hancock on Fender Rhodes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFzMYsLkuxI

Arthur Stead
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Quote:
On Jul 22, 2015, stoneunhinged wrote:
Here's one for Arthur.

First, the context: this is from a faculty talent show at Grove City College around 1991 or 1992. Me, the vice president of the college, and another professor (of business, I think; he's the one singing). The drummer and the bass player are sons. We got together and practiced a couple of times, then performed at the talent show.

I was around 30 years old and had never performed music in front of an audience.

So, the auditorium was packed--standing room only--with, I dunno, maybe 1500 or so. Mostly students. And we play a song, and then we start a version of Pretty Woman. (It's around the 3:10 or 3:15 mark). The crowd was enthusiastic. Anyway, I start a solo around 4:20 or so, and when the crowd realized I was actually playing a solo they went NUTS, and all of the hair on my legs and arms stood up, and there was this weird surge of electricity, and I couldn't hardly even play anymore because of the size of the rush. And I thought, "Is this what rock stars feel everyday?" It was like being God for thirty seconds. Indescribable.

For me, rock stars are indeed Gods. Naughty Gods, but Gods nonetheless.

Anyway, I'm embarrassed to post this. It is definitely NOT one of the best solos of all time. But it made the hair on my arms and legs stand up. At least when I played it. Smile

(I'm the skinny guy with the Strat)



Hey Jeff,

I forgot to mention I liked your choice of material!

Made me long to fulfill a dream of mine ... to one day put together a band which plays some old favorites from the 60's. Especially early songs by Brit bands like the Stones, Kinks, Hollies, Troggs, Yardbirds, Them, Pretty Things, Zombies, etc.

Alas, due to life's circumstances, that dream will never become a reality.
Arthur Stead
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MGordonB
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So subjective, but here goes...
1 - Duane Allman, anything from Filmore East
2 - Lonnie Mack, Stop
3 - Carlos Santana, His version of Little Wing with Joe Cocker
4 - Bill Frisell, Shenandoah
5 - The Edge, pretty much anything from Unforgettable Fire
6 - Jeff Healy, The entire See the Light album
7 - Phil Manzanera (Roxy Music), Like a Hurricane ( Niel Young's original version is very good too )
8 - Buddy Guy, Luther Allison, Jimmy Dawkins ( pretty much any fine Chicago bluesman for that matter )
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