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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » I'm still trying to make a wood bucket.... (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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MKmagic
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Here is a link for a bucket plan with straight sides.

http://www.fastol.com/~vicsue/bucket.htm

I plan to build one with tapered sides soon.
GG
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Bryan, Draw it all out first, full scale,then procede with what tools you have to make a mock up,then go for it,It's one of those jobs where it's probaly as quick to make 2 or 3 in one go.
Best of luck, GG
DoctorAmazo
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Many years ago I made a segmented telescope tube 10" diameter X 5 ft long. It was not tapered. I'm not sure which "angles" you're having trouble with.

The miters are simple: 180/# of segments=miter degrees

For the taper, decide the diameters of the top and bottom and calculate the circumference for each. Simply dividing the circumference by the # of segments will give you an approximate segment width. Calculate width for both top and bottom of segment and start sawing.

Or, try this freeware: http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz/f......cket.zip

I, too, would recommend splined joints. I "clamped" my tube with duct tape. If the miters are reasonably accurate, it will assume a near-perfect circle on it's own. You can take measurements across the top and use tape to adjust it if it's too far off. (Bottom, too, but the bucket bottom should pull that in just fine...assuming this bucket HAS a bottom.)

Another thought: Stand it up vertically while the glue drys. That way, gravity won't be trying to make it oval, AND the glue squeezeout will run down the joints, instead of across the staves.
bclay
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First of all your angles are wrong for a 12 sided "box" your angle should be 15 degrees not 30. 360/12=30 then you need to divide by 2 for each side of your vertical slat thus you have a 15 degree angle try that. good luck Brian
Michael Baker
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Quote:
On 2006-06-22 23:59, bclay wrote:
First of all your angles are wrong for a 12 sided "box" your angle should be 15 degrees not 30. 360/12=30 then you need to divide by 2 for each side of your vertical slat thus you have a 15 degree angle try that. good luck Brian


I noticed this too, but assumed he was talking about the combined angle (incorporating 2 staves), which would be 30 degrees.

This is correct. You will need to miter each side of each stave to a 15 degree angle for a 12-sided bucket. Also, it would be helpful to have a taper jig to run on your table saw's rip fence. This will help the accuracy of your other angle cuts. Opposite sides of each stave must be cut at equal, but opposing angles, on two perpendicular planes at the same time. The angle of these other cuts will be determined by the method suggested above (circumfrence divided by number of staves, and this quotient used in relationship with that of the opposite end of the bucket).

(Ain't math great!)

I once made 4-sided tapered legs for a shadow box illusion, and while not nearly as complex as your bucket, it required the same thought processes to get the cuts made right.

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
ClintonMagus
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Michael, can't you use "furlongs per fortnight" in there somewhere?

;)

Amos McCormick
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
Michael Baker
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Quote:
On 2006-06-23 07:16, amosmc wrote:
Michael, can't you use "furlongs per fortnight" in there somewhere?

;)

Amos McCormick


Smile That's funny! It would be a LOT easier to stand along side the saw with someone and say, "Do this."

~michael
~michael baker
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Bryan Gilles
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15 degree.... LOL.. I can't believe I overlooked this!!! I guess you tend to miss the important things worrying about the others...

Thanks to all!
Bryan
Michael Baker
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"Where'd all these extra parts come from??"
~michael baker
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Dr. Solar
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Hello Bryan,

You get a taper fixure at Sears or and wood tool store. You draw a series of circles with a compass. Two circles represent the top diameter inside and outside dimension. The next set represents the inside and outside of the bottom diameter's dimension. Now divide these into 12 equal spaces on the outside circles. Connect the dots with lines that transfix the center point. This gives you the precise angles and measure of the outside, or widest surface of each slat. Now extrapolate the top to bottom angle by drawing a profile of said pail. Use an angle finder on this line to give you the angle of the taper. Wow, and I dropped out of geometry saying I wanted to be an artist, " I'll never use math".

Good luck with the duck bucket.

Dr Solar
"look for me in all things forgotten"
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Bryan Gilles
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Excellent work to all!!!
Michael Baker
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So, how's it coming along??
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Bill Hegbli
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According to my experience circles are divided by 10, making a 10 sided circle. I once wanted to make a jumbo thimble, and I checked with a shop teacher and he confirmed the rule to make it 10 sided. That make the math more difficult and the cutting.

For a bench saw you do need to make or purchase a jig to get the angels correct. Best advice is to go to any high school or community college that has a wood shop and seek out a teacher. He will be more then happy to advise you on this cutting porcess. You don't need to grove the wood, just use good wood glue or wood glue that mixes together for outdoor use. Then it will be water proof.

As I have suggested before, buy a good cabinet making book and you will have much of the knowledge to make any magic trick. Popular Science published the best book I ever bought on Cabinet and it was only $5.00 and is the most valuable book to me or making quality wood working magic.

Good luck!
Bryan Gilles
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Thanks wmhegbli-

I just purchased a couple "Chamfer Router Bits" from Rockler. They come in 11.25 degrees for a 16 sided bucket, 15 degrees for a 12 sided bucket, 22.5 degress for an 8 sided bucket, and 30 degrees for a 6 sided bucket. I bought the bits for a 12 sided and 8 sided bucket. These only run $31.99 at rockler.com! I still need to purchase the "Precision Taper Jig" for my table saw (it can also moount to a bandsaw). It comes in a 23" length and can be mounted on either side of the fence. It's only $19.99...

My router is a 2.5 hp Craftsman and works beautifully on the exotic woods... I'll attempt to post pictures and instructions as I get further along...

-Good luck to all!
Bryan Gilles
Michael Baker
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Let me know how the router/saw combination works. I would have used the table saw only, angling the blade to 15 degrees and using the taper jig on the rip fence at the same time.

I want to hear your results.

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Bryan Gilles
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I thought of this approach; however, I would like to make several of these buckets and the router is such a precise cut...

I will definately inform you of the progress.

-Bryan
RiserMagic
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Bryan;
There are other angles to worry about too. You will discover these after you cut your taper pieces and attempt to assemble things. BTW - the router bits are easiest to use for your job if you have a router table.
Jim
Bryan Gilles
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Yah, I've built a router table much like the ones used on "Router Workshop" on the BYU TV Network...
Here's a link to see what I modeled it after:
http://us.oak-park.com/catalogue.html?li......a12.html

What are those other angles you mention?

-Bryan
p.s.- It's amazing how much you can do these days with routers!!!
RiserMagic
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Bryan;
The tops and bottoms of each slat need to be cut so that the bucket sits flat on the floor and a lid sits flat on the bucket. After tapering the individual slats, the top and bottom cuts will need to be made and will be compound angles. These, like the rest of the project, are easy; but will require some thinking.
Jim
Bryan Gilles
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Oh... good thinking ... Thank you!
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