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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The clothes we wear » » Is it ok to just wear a suit? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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magicleo
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Leaving the subject of "ties"...
I usually wear strait black- a black t-shirt with black dress pants, socks and shoes. I also wear a Yin-Yang necklace.
If my audience is older and more mature, and I'm performing for a more formal occasion, I wear a white dress shirt, black dress pants, black socks and shoes, and a mellow tie. In this case I leave out the Yin-Yang necklace and a suitcoat.
Nongard1
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I perform in a black pinstripe "zoot" suit style with a white shirt and a white tie. Or I wear a pink striped bugatchi shirt, open, with a black stripe on black Armani 2-pc suit for more casual events...

Richard
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BCaldwell
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Quote:
On 2006-09-01 10:41, Marvello wrote:
Quote:
On 2006-09-01 10:18, Al Angello wrote:
Wear a loud tie. When women notice you, and compliment you it is a sure sign that you have made an impression. Please do not wear one of those magicians ties, some magicians think they look cool, but I think THEY LOOK EXTREMELY, EXTREMELY TACKY.
MY OPINION
Al Angello

what's a magician's tie? One with cards or bunnies on it? I must be living under a rock or don't take notice of other mens neckties.

---


Edit - I just did a search - are you talking about ties like this?

Image


While searching I did find this tie-, and though tacky I kinda like it... the rubber chicken tie!

Image


I hope none of my friends or family find this website before Christmas, or I might be finding one (or more) of these under the tree! Smile
"...that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." Dennis Miller Smile

~Bob~
JackScratch
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Quote:
On 2006-08-31 01:32, Astrid wrote:
Chris Capehart made a good point in one of his lectures that I recently attended when he said that the magician needs something that sets him apart from his audience. A suit is appropriate as long as you don't blend in to the event so much that you are no longer the entertainer, but merely another person attending the function.


While I agree with this statement, be careful about making rules. I can easily envision a routine that includes a sort of "magician from an audience member " that could be fun, but that's the point. Plan your performance out. Develope a style you wish to present, and an image you wish to bring to your audience. The thing about threads like this, is that there aren't any rules here. You want to be creative, you want to be clever, you want to create something new that your audience will enjoy. That's why so many different magicians wear so many different outfits. All that matters is that your clothes do the best job possible of supporting the character you portray and your theme. Though as mentioned elsewhere, you do want to present a clean professional image.
sjdavison
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Agreed on trying to dress better than the others at the party, but please do it with some class! Magician ties/waitscoats - make me want to end magic!! Apologies Al, I have to disagree on the loud ties - I think to try and grab attention with a garish piece of clothing doesn't work! (This is of course just for me).

A smart suit is more than enough. But your personality and entertaining skills are the most important thing. Appearance should go without saying.

Simon
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pepka
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I grew up in a suit and tie. I went to a private school where you couldn't wear jeans and a sweatshirt to school. Most kids wore khakis and a polo shirt. I was in a tie 90% of the time in high school and college. It's not really that frequent anymore unless I'm performing. McBride gave a great quote on one of his videos, "Always dress like you're going somewhere better later." For a restaurnat gig, I may be in a tie with a vest and sleeves rolled up. Sometimes a sharp shirt and no tie with a suit. Special occasions always call for a tux. I tried to post pics, but I'm an idiot. Look at http://www.magicpepka.com to see what I mean. You guys are right about the "magic" ties. Very cheesy. The one possible exception might be for a kids show or school program.

The summer is kind of difficult. Recently, if it's a VERY casual event, I've been wearing a "lounge" type shirt. Some of these are really cool and can be obtained from http://www.daddyos.com
larrylegal
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I have been struggling for a while on what outfit to wear for performances and haven't settled on 1 style yet. While an indoor formal affair of close up table hopping magic may call for a suit and tie, I am concerned that spectators will assume I am using my sleeves when I am not. Do any of you roll up your suit sleeves when perfoming, or does that look ridiculous? While a dress shirt and tie alone would do the trick (so to speak)without a coat, as it is easy to push up your sleeves a bit, you then lose needed pocket space. While an outdoor casual performance may allow for a pouch to be worn for extra pockets, I definately would not wear a pouch at a formal affair. Suggestions? I have a Bar Mitvah reception in less than 2 weeks and haven't decided yet.
JackScratch
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I always remove my coat, and roll up my sleves when performinf "hopping halves". The way I perform the effect always elicites a "they went up your sleves" from my audience. Thus, I wrote that statement coming from the audience into my script. As I'm removing my coat and rolling up my sleves, I tell my audience why I am doing it. I tell them about the resonse that the effect I am about to perform always gets, and how what I am doing will alleviate that. Good conversation is the most important part of close up.
larrylegal
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Thanks JackScratch. Does anyone else have issues with wearing a jacket when performing close up because you don't want your audience to assume your sleeves are at work?
Al Angello
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Sjdavison
It is hard to disagree with a man dressed for a Fox hunt, but I think we both agree on the desired results, it's just how we get there that is different. I take an American approach, and you take the British approach.
Al Angello
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Mike Goeller
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I have very little fashion sense of my own. My Wife will gladly testify to this.

This is what has worked for me.

If you want to work in the corporate world, or land high paying gigs you have to look the part.

Go to Nordstroms or some where, where CEO's would shop, where they have a personal shopper who will walk you thru and help you find some great looks for you. Plus they'll custom tailor the suit's to you, so they look great on you. (and you'll feel great wearing it)
It cost some bucks but its a good investment. You don't have to buy all of your stuff from them just by one nice suit, a really nice shirt, some cuff links, and take notes... ask questions... try on lots of differnt things. Find out your mesurements that look good. Even take pictures of some of the differnt looks they give you. (buy at least one outfit from them to make it worth the sales persons time)

Now take all that info and go into one of the bargin shops like K&G, or Simms and you'll have learned from asking questions what will look good, what is and says expensive. (even if you can get it at a bargin)

Two more things, Shoes don't skimp on them, Make sure there top dollar and comfortable. Make sure they stay shined.
Some people (old school) check out your shoes first and actually make character judgements on your shoes. (I find this strange but know it to be true)

The last thing is a good watch. A nice Older Omega, has class to it, and doesn't scream Ego like Rolex can. Tag, Britling, these are some other good brands. When you can afford it pick a used one up from a jewler. Don't be tempted to where a knock (fake). People who know watches will spot them a mile away and it makes you look cheap.

It will not be cheap to look good, but it will pay you back many more times over then the latest trick.

In a 12hr overnight lecture of Joel Bauer's he talked about having his suits made in Hong Kong. He said he had tried Armani suits and found there quality wasn't that great for the money. He only paid $500 a suit, and I can tell you that they looked a lot more expensive than that. So bargins can be had.

The important thing is to look good, and successful. People want to work with Successful people. Dressing is as much an Illusion as any magic. You create an image. I'm a T-shirt and Jeans type of guy, but when it comes to Performing, and Meetings, I play the part. I think this is one of the best investments you can make if you want to perform regularly,

Just my Humble Opinion,
Mike G.
Al Angello
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Hey Mike
Great post, you went a little further than I would, but I'll bet you really perform good in those Nordstrom suits. I go to Joseph A. Bank when they have a big sale. The last time I shoped they had a two hour Saturday morning sale, I got a blue camel hair blazer for $150. I was a happy boy that day.
I like your style
Al Angello

PS- As a staff member I would like to welcome you to the magic Café.
Al Angello The Comic Juggler/Magician
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"Footprints on your ceiling are almost gone"
BrianMillerMagic
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Quote:
On 2007-01-05 09:42, larrylegal wrote:
Thanks JackScratch. Does anyone else have issues with wearing a jacket when performing close up because you don't want your audience to assume your sleeves are at work?


My sleeves are ALWAYS rolled up on my jacket. I roll them both up to just above the elbow very neatly, and then use a rubberband on each one to keep them there. One of the comments I get quite often is, "Holy &%^*! And you don't even have sleeves on!" I hate working with sleeves down to begin with, plus this way no one can go with "it's up your sleeves."
larrylegal
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Quote:
On 2007-01-07 21:24, BrianMillerMagic wrote:
Quote:
On 2007-01-05 09:42, larrylegal wrote:
Thanks JackScratch. Does anyone else have issues with wearing a jacket when performing close up because you don't want your audience to assume your sleeves are at work?


My sleeves are ALWAYS rolled up on my jacket. I roll them both up to just above the elbow very neatly, and then use a rubberband on each one to keep them there. One of the comments I get quite often is, "Holy &%^*! And you don't even have sleeves on!" I hate working with sleeves down to begin with, plus this way no one can go with "it's up your sleeves."

If I can find a way, as you have, to keep the sleeves up and still look good, that's what I intend to do at this next performance where I will have a suit jacket on (tux to be exact). The other idea I had is to take off the coat, or just roll up my sleeves, on a particular effect that I think might lend itself to the belief that sleeves where being used. This might drive the point home further and create a more magical demonstration a well. It's interesting the conditions that spectators believe make the magic seem that much more impossible. Thanks for the feedback.
Al Angello
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Often times I will remove my jacket for a trick to demonstrate that now I'm really getting serious look on my face.
Al
Al Angello The Comic Juggler/Magician
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http://home.comcast.net/~juggleral/
"Footprints on your ceiling are almost gone"
Mike Goeller
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I often take the cuff links off and roll up the sleeves as I'm working.

I use to do a lot of walk-around... wait, no I still do a lot of walk around. Lately however I took the advise from Denny Haney (of Denny and Lee's) Lecture notes to bring or request a table be set and perform behind that. Its a much more powerful possition. I'll do a little walk around to get everyone going then let them know I'll be doing more (a show) where ever the table is set up.

This is one of the best things I have done. Now instead of 2-10 people reacting at a time to a routine its 30-40 piled around and watching... all laughing and reacting loudly at the same time. The clients are thrilled, my fees have gone way up since I started doing this, and you are in a power position and can do magic that you wouldn't typically carry on you. (Including all of the fun bar gags and bits)

So back to fashion, I'll start with the sleeves down then as the evening goes on the sleeves get rolled up. Kind of like Sinatra undoing his tie and shirt as he's working for the audience.

Also on Fashion, Johnny Fox (Greatest Ren. act ever) called me the other day and we got to speaking on fashion, his advise was to find/hire a stylist to work with you to teach you what will look good for you.

This advise is apparently very good, as Denny was telling me that the hotel director at a venue he worked at in the pokonos was a former member of Marcel Marso (forgive spelling please) Sigfried and Roy were fans, and he was with them when they went to a stylist and said : we don't care how much it cost... we want you to make us and teach us to look like a million dollars when ever we walk out on stage. She taught them the hair, make-up and styles that they used for the rest of there carrer, and the rest is history.

I don't think you have to where a suit if your a character act, however I've heard story's about magicians showing up in t-shirts and jeans to corporate fuctions. The clients were not happy. I will echo what was said earlier... Always dress like you've got somewhere better to go afterward (McBride)

Remember the 4, 4's -
It takes $40 more to buy nice clothes (was said orig in the 40's)
It takes 4 minutes longer to dress nice
Its 4 degrees hotter to where a suit and dress right
but you get 400 times the respect.
(related at lecture from Joel Bauer)

Sorry about the long post... Hope some of it helps..

Mike G.
Magic of Dan
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I used to wear a tie and vest, but I have stopped wearing the tie. I switched to just wearing bright colored dress shirts, a black suit coat I got from Walmart for $59 and nice black slacks. I always get told I look like a magician. (I am not sure if they really mean it or not). All I know is that I am much more comfortable without the tie.
Dan
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JackScratch
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Quote:
On 2007-01-07 21:24, BrianMillerMagic wrote:
Quote:
On 2007-01-05 09:42, larrylegal wrote:
Thanks JackScratch. Does anyone else have issues with wearing a jacket when performing close up because you don't want your audience to assume your sleeves are at work?


My sleeves are ALWAYS rolled up on my jacket. I roll them both up to just above the elbow very neatly, and then use a rubberband on each one to keep them there. One of the comments I get quite often is, "Holy &%^*! And you don't even have sleeves on!" I hate working with sleeves down to begin with, plus this way no one can go with "it's up your sleeves."


In my general rule of "never say never" I wouldn't disagree with your choice. That being said, would you do this with traditional eveningwear? The way you discribe your look, it sounds a little 80s, which is fine, I'm a big fan of 80s fassion, but you have to be careful that it is your look. I'm sure you have done that, but it wouldn't be right for everyone.

I couldn't keep my sleeves rolled up the whole event. I go for a very formal look, even if it's just business formal. Rolled up sleeves wouldn't look right with my particular style.
Strangelittleman
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My current look for work (and it will change as the client base develops) is a casual suit, black dress shirt, silver tie (windsor) with the mohawk done.

The trick is to project yourself correctly as many suits can "blend" into the background and be very plain. Hence the casual apperance of my current suit, the black shirt with silver tie - its still dressing above the casual look of my clients yet not quite "CEO" which is not appropriate, which when you add the hair gives it the exact apperance and "look" I'm after.

Oh - and if you are wearing a suit - spend the cash and get it tailored, I think Mike suggested this aswell. It DOES make a difference, not only in comfort but a good eye can always spot the difference from "off the rack".

Also - make sure that any accessories your wearing suit the suit. Sorry guys but I see some blokes wearing classy suits with mickey mouse watches/smiley cuff links/whatever and just want to cry lol.

I wouldnt stress on the tie though - dress down a step if its appropriate - a nice suit and dress shirt without a tie can still be very classy.
JackScratch
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I like to look classy but just the tiniest bit alien. My most casual outfit is a black dress shirt, black vest, black sportscoat, black pants, with a mostly red and white art deco half windsor and matching pocket square. It's a suit. It looks very nice, but it doesn't quite fit with modern fasion and trends. It stands out. One might even say it jumps out. But it doesn't look inappropriate.

Not every act has the same goal. Fact is, depending on your goal, you might even want to blend right in with your audience. I always recomend extremem caution when straying this far from the industry status quo, but it is entirely possible. What is most important is that your attire present the image that best helps your performance to function as intended. Within those bounds, I realy can't imagine any ensamble that wouldn't be right, given a particular intended effect. If you are new to the art, however, or making the transition from amateur to pro, no reason to go re-inventing the wheel.
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