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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Card splitting : after the work? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Jonathan P.
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Belgium
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Hi,
I made some homemade card using card splitting techniques as explained by Martini in his DVD. But even after some time in some "flattening devices" they tend to get a shape that's different than the normal cards usual bow. So, they aren't easy to align with other cards and stay hidden when displaying a double: the edges will show due to the fact that the cards slightly separate from each other.
Does anyone has a solution to this problem, to condition the split cards to get the shape of regular card? Maybe store them in a eck of cards for some time, or bending them regularly to put the shape on them (without destroying them of course...)?
Thanks,
Jonathan.
silverking
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I have gotten a far better product since I've switched from rubber cement to dry-mount paper and a hot iron to put the cards back together.

The "wavey" shapes are caused by the solvents in the rubber cement reacting with the paper in the card, so get rid of the rubber cement.

Remember though that Martini's method of aligning the two halves after splitting is quite dependant on the adhesive properties of the rubber cement, so you'll still have to work on your accuracy when re-aligning.
Todd Lassen (the coin guy) makes a nice device for aligning the two halves and applying heat to the dry-mount paper.
magicjohn2278
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Isle of Man UK
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I haven't researched Martin's recommendation on the type of adhesive to use (And he is far better at this than I am!), but I suspect that the glue you are using is the problem. - I have had good results with a "Pritt stick" - the adhesive alows for some repositioning of the two halves, and you end up with a card that has the same "feel" as a regular card. (It is usually quite flat after having been pressed, but can easily be bent slightly to match your regular deck.)
billfromoregon
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Another adhesive you might try is spray mount adhesive, such as is used in mounting artwork. I have had good luck with this, both for adhesion and for the cards remaining flat after pressing. I would also recommend Todd's setup, if you have the money.
ToasterofDoom
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I have tried spray adhesive but didn't work so well. Might be because I used a wood bonding spray, but I'm sticking with rubber cement.
silverking
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In Marty's DVD he reccomends only using Elmers rubber cement.

Personally, I've always found that the rubber cement is loaded with powerful solvents all wanting to cause the card to warp, and I've never been happy with the results using it.
It's also got a definite "mil thickness" in terms of its properties when it dries......it DOES add to the thickness of the card, it's impossible for it not to.

The nice thing about dry-mount tissue is that it's thinner than a single ply piece of Kleenex, and when your card is finished that's the only thickness that's been added to the card.
It's also not a liquid based product, so there are no active solvents interacting with the card.
kaytracy
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Adhesives are a tricky thing. You really have to use the right adhesive for the job you want to do. Using wood adhesive for something you want to keep thin defeats the intent. Wood stuff needs to make a good bond on things that are not always smooth flat surfaces with good contact. It needs to fillt he voids to do the job.

Rubber cement right from the bottle, or a bottle on your shlf, might be starting to dry out, and will need a bit of thinner added to make it work smoothly on your project.
DO follow the directions for safety. Well ventilated has an actual working condition deffinition from OSHA. Out-door is best, but a well ventilated area is one with all windows and doors open, and a strong fan blowing the air.

If I recall in the DVD the use of a press of some sort is also included.
Evenn with dry mount tissue, the heat of the iron will cause a slight warping due to the ambient moisture in the stock, and things will need to be kept flat while cooling for best results.

Just as an FYI, for anyone who reads this far, Dry mount can be harder to find in smaller towns, and frame shops do not readily part with it as it cuts into their business. An alternative is to go to the sewing section of the local fabric store and get "stitch witchery", or "Sulky" brand iron on applique adhesive. (they also make a water dissolving sheet for use in sewing...)
Some of these are thicker than others so some experimenting might be inorder for your needs.
k
Kay and Tory
www.Bizarremagick.com
Jonathan P.
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Wow, many thanks for the advices!
mkiger
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I have used glue sticks before, the glue deteriorated and the cards peeled. The rubber cement works well. I used to use the middle layer on both parts after scraping with a ulility knifeblade. The extra thickness of the middle layers allowed both a proper thickness, crisp feel, and no bleed through or discoloration from the cement. The thicker face/back also made the line-up easier.
Jonathan P.
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To the users of "dry mount": do you replace the central part of the card by the dry moint sheet or do you add the dry mount as a "fourth" layer in the new card?

BTW, Martini told me he sent me an "Elmer" rubber cement bottle. I'll try this one out ASAP.
Many thzanks!
Jonathan.
kaytracy
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I will only scrape the inside layer off if it when the layers do not seperate cleanly<, usually only have this trouble with cheap cardds>. I use a flat block of wood with a medium fine grain grit to clean the rough stuff up. I do NOT sand the single layer side much at all, as it is too easy to go right through.

Glue sticks are more like the old paste used in grade school, and I find it dries way too hard and tends to crack. Not really practical for use on a flexing surface.

When using the dry mount, it will dpend on the thickness of the "tissue". Some are thick enough that they will really be noticable. Others not as much. A bit of time in the deck being used and worked will also help soften them a bit. though they will not pass a full on handling inspection by a participantT

DO be sure to read the bottles on the rubber cements and if any thinner is needed, use the right one! Bestine (used for Best Test) might not be the one you wnat for other rubber cememts.
One of the key things about the solvents used with the cements is that they dry/volitilize off quickly.

Also, if you are getting a bit of glop around the edges after setting, take a "rubber booger" and wipe them off. A booger is made by rolling up dried rubber cememt to make a little ball you can grip and move easily. It picks up the little bits and slops that go astray.
k
Kay and Tory
www.Bizarremagick.com
keithmagic
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I'm not sure about the Martini instructions, but Ron Bauer published a great way of aligning things like gimmickes cards and cash in his booklet "Xerox Money". I have used the technique succesfully quite a few times.

Keith
Author of "The Festival Entertainer" The Professional Entertainer's Guide to Booking and Working Outdoor Fairs, Festivals, and Events.
Available at http://www.howtobookfestivals.com
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