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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Trade Show Magic Question (7 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Hart Keene
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Eugene, OR
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When was this released, Seth? Recently, I take it, but just wondering...
-Hart

Check out my website:
Magician Portland Oregon
corpmagi
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The reviews are in the February, 2007 issues of MUM and Genii.
MAGIC Magazine's review, I believe, is scheduled for next month.
A Modern Trade Show Handbook
www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
corpmagi
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Sorry, I may have misunderstood you. A Modern Trade Show Handbook was released in August, 2006.
A Modern Trade Show Handbook
www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
Dannydoyle
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Quote:
On 2007-02-15 16:35, corpmagi wrote:
Sorry, I may have misunderstood you. A Modern Trade Show Handbook was released in August, 2006.


I will get one. Been a LONG time since I bought a book. I am looking forward to reading it!
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
corpmagi
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Then I'm honored. I think you will find it a good read.

Seth Kramer
A Modern Trade Show Handbook
www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
Dannydoyle
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I have little doubt! Actually, no doubt.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
bronx
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Another trade show question:

What routines do trade show magicians like that involve the use of a board and marking pen? I've had this question put to me by a fellow performer whose client wants to do a lot of "branding". He is working up a routine that involves revealing the word, number, drawing, etc., while at the same time displaying the company's logo.

He's using book test, magic square, etc., but is looking for some new ideas.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

B
CurtMiller
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My advice is to stick to the "A" material that you already have. Look for ways to customize it to deliver your client's message. A color-changing card can illustrate how your client's company stands out from the competition; your three ropes can represent quality, service, and reliability, etc. My point is, DON'T come up with a bunch of new material that isn't going to kill; do your best stuff, be comfortable with it, and focus on the message and keeping the crowds. Oh, and don't ask for applause, or your crowd will think it's over and bolt! Hope this helps.

Curt Miller
"Magic + Comedy = Entertainment!"
http://www.curtmiller.com
jlevey
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...So how did the Trade show in May 2007 go, Ilan?

Please tell us.

Jonathan
Jonathan
Max & Maxine Entertainment
Magicians with a touch of comedy!
___________________________________
www.maxmagician.com
www.mindreadershow.com
www.monsieurmagic.com
theothermentalist
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I know this is an old thread, but I'm hoping someone will be able to answer. If I'm booked for a three day trade show at a rate of (let's say) $2,500 a day, but it takes me a day on either side of the event to travel. Would ya'll recommend charging:

A) $7,500 + a reduced day-rate for the two travel days + plane/hotel
B) $12,500 +/day + plane/hotel
Dannydoyle
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Each seems a bit confusing.

I am a fan of one price done. No explanation needed.

That is just me, doesn't make it the right answer.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Mindpro
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Whenever I hear such thoughts or implications it becomes apparent that the person has little or no trade show experience and go off what they believe or have perceived, rather than reality. Also consumer market mentalities and operations vs. professional mentalities and operations also greatly come into play. Often times what a consumer level performer believes to be professional market perceptions, beliefs and operations are actually quite different from actual professional market beliefs, expectations and mentalities.

I too am a proponent of inclusive pricing. I am also of the belief that "travel days" are simply the cost of doing business for the artist. If they are paying your travel and lodging that is fine, but to charge additional for this (travel days) is a belief I've never been a fan of. This is performer's thinking here not win-win relationship thinking. An extra $5,000 for traveling? You chose to accept a gig outside of your market, this is your choice.

Also I'm guessing this is a direct booking between you and the client? Often for multi-day bookings or agency bookings of multiple days they may actually expect a packaged price for booking multiple days. Especially if paying for your travel and lodging. Many will not do this for only a single day expense, so when they agree to a multi-day agreement it is not far-fetched to expect a discounted package price.

Also there's the issue of your worth and value. Are your worth the amount just because you are asking for this? And also not from your perspective, but from the client's perspective?
thomasR
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Mindpro... Are you aware of any professional performers who charge a rate for a travel day? I'm not... But wasn't sure if it was a "thing" in certain areas of the business.
Dannydoyle
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Quote:
On Jun 1, 2017, thomasR wrote:
Mindpro... Are you aware of any professional performers who charge a rate for a travel day? I'm not... But wasn't sure if it was a "thing" in certain areas of the business.


I am also not aware.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
theothermentalist
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Thank you all for the input.

Mindpro, I hear your concern about the lack of certain types of experience on the part of the questioner. Let me reassure you that the question was a hypothetical one at this point. This was prompted because I've worked numerous events for a fairly large corporation, including some ancillary events held during a (much more local) trade show, but never worked the floor for them. I'm toying with the idea of pitching them for this year's show, and it cross-country, so this was all part of my thought experiment of working through that proposal.

I've been doing research for some time about expanding my work (or rather, more heavily targeting/prospecting) within professional/corporate markets. I've read and listened to a couple of the relevant Jim Snack courses, Seth Kramer's book, Danny Orleans lecture notes, as well as many Café threads. The question posed was an effort to reach an understanding of common practice at this level of performance. All of these resources are wonderful, but I guess I'm searching for the minutiae for every moving part of a deal like this.

Perhaps a rephrased question should read: Assume that you're giving a client an all-in price for a three day trade show that requires a full travel day on each side of it. At what rate is it common practice to consider charging for non-show days? I mean this as in, when a performer is doing their mental math for where to set that all-in price, how much of a of a consideration are those travel days?

Oy, what a wordy question. Either way, thank you all again for your responses.
Mindpro
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Thanks for the further clarification. I commend you for your interests in operating and performing on this level and your efforts to do research and your due diligence to learn and understand these differences in order to move towards this type of possibility for your performance.

Many performers do not make this distinction and simply use their consumer market mentalities when making a professional market offer, bid or proposal. Your understanding of the difference of the ancillary events and working the actual floor demonstrate this. You have referenced some good resources with valuable information on working the trade show market.

thomasR, to answer your question, yes I am but quite rarely or exclusively. Some top talent in certain markets do so but usually include this into their daily rate rather than a line item for "travel day compensation." This is the exception more than the rule. With that said I did last fall negotiate my daughter's 2016-17 international tour and did indeed include a travel day rate of 50% of her normal day rate for travel days with travel greater than three hours*, plus a full days per diem. Now again, to make this clear, it is a bit more acceptable in her performance market for her type of presentations. Still the exception, but it does exist.

*On a professional market level this is a strategy used by touring artists to attempt to insure routings are kept tight and close together. Some agents and promoters that are only interested in the money will accept any random booking regardless of the routing. Such as a date in Miami, then a date in Seattle, followed by a date in Atlanta, then Boston, then Phoenix, then Charlotte. They book whatever they can whenever they can which typically drives the artists crazy. When using a paid travel date for days with air travel over 3 or 4 hours or ground (bus, truck, RV) travel of more than 6 or 8 hours, it is a tactic to keep these agents and promoters booking tighter and closer routing without the consequence of paying the talent a partial or full days travel rate. Again, this is not the same for the majority of performers here on the Café or in the markets discussed here.

Now if you are not in the top of your market, forget about it. And even then it is only used rarely, but in full disclosure, it is possible.
thomasR
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The music acts I work for out of nashville simply adjust their price based on the show being "routed" or a "one-off."

If you take a date that works with the artists schedule... It can be half the cost of having the artist on a specific date of your choosing.

The artists that I have worked for do not let booking agents confirm a date without getting their approval. The booking agents seek and collect the offer, they forward the offer to management, who then forward it to the artist for final approval.

*the above is in no way meant as an argument... Just saying what I have witnessed in my little corner of the industry*
Dannydoyle
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Quote:
On Jun 2, 2017, thomasR wrote:
The music acts I work for out of nashville simply adjust their price based on the show being "routed" or a "one-off."

If you take a date that works with the artists schedule... It can be half the cost of having the artist on a specific date of your choosing.

The artists that I have worked for do not let booking agents confirm a date without getting their approval. The booking agents seek and collect the offer, they forward the offer to management, who then forward it to the artist for final approval.

*the above is in no way meant as an argument... Just saying what I have witnessed in my little corner of the industry*


None of this is uncommon. As a matter of fact it is exactly the method I used, sans the management aspect of it.

I'm a fan of one price pricing. I always thought that the more things there are involved the easier it is to raise an objection. If you hit them with one price, it is one answer not a series of them

(Mind you I am only relaying information, not arguing.)

I always felt that every interaction prior to sale is an opportunity for them to object. Some objections are good because they give you opportunity to further your sales pitch. But once you have gotten to price I personally think it is a mistake to have opportunities for them to object. You want the deal done. Sales pitch is over once you are talking money or at least should be in my view.

So if it is $X for the show and $Y for travel and $Z for hotel expenses oh and by the way it is $AA for travel days on each side it gives them so many opportunities to object. They may see another artist with no travel days and just think it is a better deal. I mean you have no idea what goes through the mind of buyers, especially when you start to talk bigger money. EVEN MORE if they are not used to spending that sort of money.

At some point it comes in their mind often to if you "deserve" it. I don't want that to creep up.

These are just based on my experience and my personal style. There are THOUSANDS of other opinions all over the map and all of them 100% correct for the people who employ them. Do not think anything I am saying should be interpreted as it must be done this way or it is wrong. Quite the opposite as a matter of fact. I know how I feel most comfortable doing things and that is half the battle.

But I do encourage others to look at what they do and why and try to understand their own process. It will make your job far easier. It is not unlike performance in that regard.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
thomasR
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Agreed Danny... I've gone back and forth with hotel expenses when bookig the variety / circus performers. Some clients can arrange for free hotels so they like that, others seem annoyed that I am adding on a fee. Other than that I agree... One price is best.
Dannydoyle
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Absolutely. Every situation is different. That is sort of the point I guess we are making.

Some clients have access to hotel rooms. Often in big events they block out rooms because it will be impossible for you to find one yourself. TRY finding a room in Vegas for the CES.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
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