The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The spooky, the mysterious...the bizarre! » » Blood from stone (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

sjdavison
View Profile
Inner circle
Surrey, UK
1379 Posts

Profile of sjdavison
Any thoughts on this- might make a good bit of beach magic! I was thinking of attaching the stone to a pull up the sleeve, and then maybe having a blood capsule in a thumbtip or something similar. What do you think? Could start with a demonstration of strength, wringing a stone for water, then blood appears, then the stone disappears.
What do you guys think?
Simon
Simon, 32, UK



www.sidavisonmagic.com
Sir T
View Profile
Special user
537 Posts

Profile of Sir T
Jim magus has a book, Rune magic, which tell's how to get blood from a rune stone. It is pretty clever.

Kevin Smile
spiral-stares
View Profile
New user
New York City
90 Posts

Profile of spiral-stares
Steve Spill used to have a comedy routine where he squeezed blood from a stone. And then he showed "how it was done." And turned the stone to show a jagged piece of metal sticking out the back that was (presumably) grinding into the palm of his hand.

Him doing it is funnier than me describing it.
Wil Castor
View Profile
Regular user
Seattle
144 Posts

Profile of Wil Castor
I would suggest using the sprizzer... check it out at hottrix.com
Pain is the craft entering into the apprentice.
Sid Mayer
View Profile
Special user
Santa Fe, NM
656 Posts

Profile of Sid Mayer
Attach a squirting nickel (obtainable from some joke and/or trick stores) to the back of the stone. Load it with stage blood and there you go.

You could use a bit of wax on the coin and attach it to the stone after the stone has been examined.

Sid
All the world's a stage ... and everybody on it is overacting.
Bilwonder
View Profile
Veteran user
Oroville CA
327 Posts

Profile of Bilwonder
Ferric Chloride and Potassium Thiocyante can be dangerous to play with and cause a nasty stain, but with the right application in bringing the two together you can get quite an effect of blood.
billswondershow.com
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain
Caleb Strange
View Profile
Special user
Manchester UK
676 Posts

Profile of Caleb Strange
Simon that's a great idea. There's more beach magic in the 'Al fresco bizarre' thread if you're interested. For me, blood from a stone would work most powerfully in an appropriate location. For example, in a stone circle the rocks themselves can speak of dark magic and bloody sacrifice. Or a more contemporary plot, but equally bizarre, would be the road surface at an accident hotspot bleeding copiuously. I've also come up with this piece of bizarre theatre, which I like so much that I'm almost reluctant to post it! But as Simon was so generous with his initial idea, then here it is.

'The Blood Beach Wrecker'

This is performed just after dusk on a wild and rocky shore. A fire is lit, and some sea yarns are spun. You pick up a old rusted baleing hook, and looking out to sea you tell this salty tale.

This particular stretch of coastline is still treacherous and grim to shipping. Sharp rocks lie in wait like brigands, and vicious currents can snare the strongest vessel. Even today, when every boat buzzes with safety equipment, still every year, when the north wind blows, and the storms churn the white water, vessels flounder, and sailors lose their lives. In times gone by, mariners were so afraid of this stretch of coastline that they called it Blood Beach, a name which still resonates in us today.

Of course, over the years, some of the locals have profitted from the booty spilt on their shores. Barrels of rum, and boxes of spices and brocades have all been dragged from the wrecks, and lost in the granite hills behind us. But mariners always believed this area to be 'clean'. Boats would crash into the cliffs, and split their sides, but they would have been driven there my callous Mother Nature, and never lured there by the hand of the deceitful wrecker man. Never, that is until Father Jacob Boseney became priest of this fair parish in 1509.

Now Boseney was a pragmatic man. And for the first few years of his tenure, seeing the poverty of his flock, and the ruthlessness of the excise men, he'd turn a blind eye to this pilfering of vessels wrecked on these shores. But on the night of February 12th, 1514, such a storm blew that the land itself seemed to tremble, and the wind boomed in the houses like mad ghosts lost in the night. Boseney prayed, knuckle white, for safe passage for all the men of the sea, and about him his church thumped and shook like a terrible drum. But then, leaping up like the spray the great cry rose through the village, 'A wreck! A wreck!'

Father Boseney hurried down to shore, fighting the wind, clutching his Bible, and saw the broken beams and ropes of some once great ship, tossed on the rocks like toys in the hands of a petulant cry. As was his custom, the little priest searched in the darkness for the remnants of life, and knelt by the dead to administer the last rites. But another cry, more awful, leapt up that night, and whispered in the cleric's heart like the voice of a snake. 'Gold! Gold! There's gold on this ship!'

And by a word Boseney was lost. Without a second thought he turned from the dead, and his eyes caught sight of the great chests of gold heaving to and fro on the shore. 'Here Father', someone said, 'a hook. Help us man!' The priest took the hook, and thumped it into the sprawling cargo. Hour after hour he fought the waves, slashing and dragging, and all the time the Deceiver's voice said 'Gold! Gold!'

If that was all there had been to it, then perhaps he could have turned again to good, and woken blasted but fresh the morrow after. But there in the dark, in the chaos of the churning waters, he smashed his hook down and found bone, instead of wood. Startled by a scream he looked down and saw his hook, buried inches deep into the head of a shore tossed sailor. And caught in the terrible moonlight, Boseney saw the man's eyes bubble with fear, and the life pour out of him, horrible and dark under his body. 'It was an accident Father', someone said. 'We weren't here. The man's head was dashed on the rocks. Let's leave him to the sea'. But for the priest it was too late. He had left the habour, for the pitch black sea.

From that moment, there was no keener pilferer of booty than the little priest. His baleing hook scythed on stormy nights with vigour and zeal. And when the weather was not so accomodating, Boseney would light fires on the church tower, and ring the bells, luring the unsuspecting onto the jagged rocks, and into the range of his bloodstained hook.

Eventually, in 1521, Boseney and his desperate band were caught by soldiers, on this very beach. And battered and bruised, but still very much alive, his body was hanged on a gibbet up on the cliff there, left out to the mercy of the sun and wind, and ravenous gulls. But it's said, on a night such as this, here on Blood Beach, the sound of the church bells, and the cries of the sailors can still be heard, stirred around in the bay by the fitful wind.


The story is all scene setting, and you PERFORM it. Act out some of the movements, especially the slashing of the hook, and say the few bits of dialogue in character. Anyone impatient for the 'magic' bit, it's coming! But pause after the story, and let it sink in.


You explain that you know of something called 'The ceremony of remembering and forgetting', and with the audience's permission, you'd like to try it here, on Blood Beach, where so many souls still linger, whipped around in the eddies of the place. You then start your ceremony, which you tailor to your own performing style. I would suggest, however, that it has a liturgical feel to it, both for the priest theme, and for what follows.

As you voice shouts across the sea and you call on the terrible forces of this place to release the trapped spirits, very faintly, almost inaudible at first, but getting louder, church bells can be heard sounding on the cliff. And as you continue to intone, and plead with the sea to release her dead, a light flares up on the dark cliffs where the church once stood.

You get more and more desperate, shaking and buffeted by the forces of the place, and suddenly, all around you close on the beach, are heard the sounds of wood beams ripping, and waves crashing, and sailors screaming in the dark. You fight this terrible cacophony, struggling for peace, and resolution, and just when it appears things are getting out of hand, you hurl the baleing hook far and long into the ink black sea. And immediately the noises cease, and the light vanishes. And all that can be heard fading to silence, is the church bell sounding now like a benediction over the night.

You are exhausted, and you pause, head bowed, then sigh. Finally, you bend down and scoop an armful of pebbles from the beach, and you hold them up to the sky and pray. 'Heavenly Father, God of the wind and the rain, and the turbulent sea, hear us now as we pray. Release the souls of men lured to this hard shore, who even now murmur amongst us, and weep in dreadful torment. Lead them out, out of the darkness, and back to the light. And wrap your arms about them like a harbour wall. All this we pray'.

Now as you say all this, and you lift the stones up, your arms should shake violently, and although your voice booms out across the sea, it should seem that you're engaged in a terrible struggle. And all the while you say the prayer, blood trickles, then gushes from the stones, down your arms, and out into the water.

Now the theatrical kicker. At the end of the prayer just given, your shoulders slump with fatigue, and you barely notice the bloody stones. Heaving a tremendous sigh, you let them trickle back into the sea. All seems finished, but then you slowly kneel down by the waves, and as you wash the blood from your arms you quietly say, 'In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost'.


A few points. I think the overtly religious nature of the final part is justified, and thematically, and theatrically right. The ultimate feeling engendered by all of this is that something has been resolved, and laid to rest. Your every action should be consistent with that. At the end, don't just wash your hands like you're demonstrating the merits of soap. You perform sacred ablutions, cupping the water, and pouring it down onto your arms.

And when all is done, you should huddle with your audience by the fire, and listen to the sea. The wondrous sea. That will be magic enough.

Regards,

Caleb Strange.
-- QCiC --
Vincenzo
View Profile
Regular user
Canada
200 Posts

Profile of Vincenzo
There's a version of this effect in the trick section of http://www.davidkenneymagic.com
sjdavison
View Profile
Inner circle
Surrey, UK
1379 Posts

Profile of sjdavison
Wow Caleb- serious stuff! Like it though. Might be a bit too religious for my liking though. I prefer something more linked to the occult. Thanks for the presentation though. Must have taken you a while to write it! Can see it would be pretty poweful. Not sure if there are that many opportunities for an audience to meet on the beach near Manchester at night. Might wait until I'm in the Caribbean for that one!
Simon
Simon, 32, UK



www.sidavisonmagic.com
Caleb Strange
View Profile
Special user
Manchester UK
676 Posts

Profile of Caleb Strange
Simon, there's always the Manchester Ship Canal instead of the beach. Though I'm not sure I'd want to wash my hands in that! I kind of pictured Cornwall for this one. Maybe working a dozen or so seaside locations, once a fortnight over the summer season. Lots of magick down there.

I wasn't sure about the religious theme for people generally, though I think I'd be comfortable with it. I nearly became a Methodist minister, 12 years ago, so all the cadence and the rhythm of the liturgy is still with me, even though some of the beliefs have now gone. Anybody find it TOO religious, or offensive even? Let me know, I can take it! When people do 'exorcisms' how religious do you make it? Is it bell, book and candle, or something else?

Regards,

Caleb Strange.
-- QCiC --
Bilwonder
View Profile
Veteran user
Oroville CA
327 Posts

Profile of Bilwonder
Caleb,
I just want to say your stuff is fantastic.
If you haven't put a few books out with this you should. You practically have enough material for one here at the Café! If it's edgy, it makes people think. Are you just making these up on the whim? Thanks for sharing
billswondershow.com
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain
Caleb Strange
View Profile
Special user
Manchester UK
676 Posts

Profile of Caleb Strange
Bilwonder, many thanks for your kind comments. I don't have any books out, and I'm happy to share here at the Café.

Generally, most of my ideas are fresh. Well, to me at least! In fact, if you read around some of the other posts, you can sort of see what's inspired me. Ideas generate ideas, and that's what I love about the Café. I do have a very large collection of notes, which I dip into from time to time. And I also post stuff that I've actually done.

Warm regards,

Caleb Strange.
-- QCiC --
TStone
View Profile
V.I.P.
Stockholm, Sweden
733 Posts

Profile of TStone
David Parr has a great routine (and great script) on this theme, titled "Blood from a stone" that I published in the swedish magazine "Nordisk Magi" about a year ago. Don't know if he has published it in english yet, but if he has, try to find it.
David de Leon
View Profile
Elite user
Sweden
414 Posts

Profile of David de Leon
Once again, thank you Caleb, that was a truly marvellous story!
magiker
View Profile
Loyal user
Sweden
283 Posts

Profile of magiker
Go to dragonskull.co.uk click on secret passage ( you will need to know the password but not difficult) and check out Blood From A Stone". An Arts & Crafts lesson by Ed Solomon.
:bat: Smile Smile
Magiker

Believe in the possibility of the impossible
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The spooky, the mysterious...the bizarre! » » Blood from stone (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2019 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.28 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL