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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Time after time » » Burnout? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

blink_inc
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Loyal user
Hamilton
278 Posts

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Hi all,

I have been going hard for over a year now. I am a stay at home dad and have been fortunate to have three hours plus per day for my practice and read/DVD for another two or so.

I find that I am not picking up my cards as much and some of the excitement is gone.
My skill is not increasing much and I find that doing the same 20 effects is getting quite boring. Starting to learn new effects or slieghts is overloading me so I have stuck with what I know.

My wife is telling me that it is time to start performing for money. I have performed every weekend spontaeously in restaurants and bars over the last year and know that I do so well, but right now I don't have the excitement (as I once did) to push me to the next level.

I don't want to ruin the experience, nor waste all of the many hours of practice, and I want to still enjoy putting looks of wonder on peoples faces.

Any suggestions? (other than take a break)
Have you ever suffered from magic burnout?
I am a Sankey addict....please, help me!

My name is Will, my company is Blink, an experience in transposition.
MagikDavid
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Loyal user
Cincinnati, OH
298 Posts

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Blink,

I believe you CAN suffer from "practice" burnout. Although practice is an important element to prepare yourself for performing... you still need 'real world' experience in order to grow as a magician. While practice should help you master the mechanics and handling of your effects, it doesn't help with other important elements such as: spontaneity, audience response, psychology, etc. Probably, the reason you're becoming bored with the process of practice, is that you're missing these other elements which involve the actual performance in front of REAL people.

Contrary to what you've heard... practice does NOT make perfect. However, if you've practiced your material to the point that you're comfortable with the handling... then it's time to move on to the next step. Hopefully, you've mastered the mechanics of your effects well enough that you can now devote time to developing your magic persona. While performing, try to connect with your audience in an entertaining way. Try to come across confident, but not arrougant... be 'in control', but not over-bearing. Be concious of how you're perceived by your audience... constantly ask yourself, "Am I entertaining these people, or am I insulting them by making them feel foolish? Are they enjoying my routine, or do they wish I'd go away?"

Of course, a lot depends on your personality and style... so your questions may differ than the ones suggested. If you haven't done so already, maybe it's time to define your ultimate goals in the field of magic. Whether you perform magic as a hobbiest, professional or occasional paid performer... the most important thing should remain (in you own words,) "...I want to still enjoy putting looks of wonder on peoples faces." Those words are the very reason I've stayed in magic for more than 50 years.

Good luck. I'm sure you'll do just fine!

Dave
One good thing about being wrong...
Is the pleasure it brings to others.
Andy the cardician
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Inner circle
A street named after my dad
3370 Posts

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There are several choices, depending on your character -

- Put away everything and do something else for a month or so.

- Watch some great magic performances and enjoy the magic (not the secret).

- Go out and perform for money ($ are great motivators).

- Meet fellow magicians.

- Create your own effect - imagine your own e-book.

- read books about magic (not about the tricks)



Hope that helped

Andy
Cards never lie
Bob Sanders
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Grammar Supervisor
Magic Valley Ranch, Clanton, Alabama
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Burnout is real! Shift to costumes, jokes, searches for venues, etc. Practice the whole show with a watch. When it's over quit! Having a practice time is great. Use the time for magic. Rehearsal is not the only productive use of the time.

Good Luck!

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Bob Sanders

Magic By Sander / The Amazed Wiz

AmazedWiz@Yahoo.com
blink_inc
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Hamilton
278 Posts

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Thanks all.

I have slowed things down in terms of time spent practicing and am now developing more of the business and image side of things as well as constructing themed routines.
Reading non trick magic books and lecture notes are helping a lot, as did joining my local IBM (great auction recently and one member congratulated on 65 years of membership).

I think too much Sankey can be bad for anyone's mind...

Thanks again,
Will//
I am a Sankey addict....please, help me!

My name is Will, my company is Blink, an experience in transposition.
CasualSoul
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Edmonton, Canada
542 Posts

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I agree with your Sankey thought Smile....but sorry, I'm not much of a fan anyway.

I completely burnt out back in November. I had to completely leave magic alone for a few months, but revisiting the Ortiz book, Strong Magic, really rekindled my passion (and I'm not even a card guy). I'm coming back now, learning some new stuff, developing new routines, and getting ready to get back to performing.
"Open their mind by performing the impossible"
Decomposed
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Eternal Order
High Desert
12046 Posts

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Im going through burnout also. I went through this before but now it seems a bit stronger. I have a heavy schedule this week also which doesn't help matters.

I picked up on a neglected hobby as of late and hopefully the passion of entertaining will return.

Coming off a lukewarm audience I find doesn't help matters.
Jay Austin
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184 Posts

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I was doing basically kid shows about 10 years ago. I did burnout and just quit preforming. The past 5 years I have done only one show a year and that was for my wife's classroom. I did a show about a month ago and found that I had the desire to start preforming again. I am currently working at reworking my act and learning a few new things. I definitely want to try to not burnout on preforming again. am finding that if I vary my practice and rehearsal I do much better. Once I learn the moves and get them down I find that I can move on to something else for a few days and then come back and develop the routine. I allows me not to get bored with doing the same thing over and over again for days.
Jay Austin

http://austin-computer-solutions.com/
Hire a tech, not a geek.
Brent McLeod
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Inner circle
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I usualy find a 3-4 week break at different times of the year
helps the burnout mode of practice & shows!

We did 6 theatre nights recently & having no practice as you perform so much does tire you out

Have a break as you mention-have other interests & nothing beats the great feel of a live show
when you perform or your restaurant magic -

Good luck
gfdiamond
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sweden
198 Posts

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Hi guys,

there is this tremendous 'honeymoon' period when you first discover magic. then you become a professional and it gets even better.

and I agree there comes a point where the 'magic' fascination plateaus.

you can see this with beginning magicians who just want to show EVERYONE they meet magic and go on too long.

great advice brent.....remember less is more and don't let magic take over your life completely...you can risk being seen as a bit of a bore by non magic people.

better to be a fun person who also does magic, than be seen as a magic freak.

good luck with everything.

regards,
geoff.
Check me out on Google. Geoff Diamond Magician.
montymagi
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Slidell La
752 Posts

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I seem to cycle. I will get very into magic for a while and then burn out for a while, then get back into it. I find working for money gets me through these cycles because although your thirst for magic is blunted the extra money is really nice. It is hard to have a hobby that is a performance art with a real audience. The extra money you make can also help pay for that really cool but expensive magic thingy you have been wanted.
rickreation
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Veteran user
336 Posts

Profile of rickreation
Quote:
On 2007-03-15 00:05, Andy the cardician wrote:
There are several choices, depending on your character -

- Put away everything and do something else for a month or so.

- Watch some great magic performances and enjoy the magic (not the secret).

- Go out and perform for money ($ are great motivators).

- Meet fellow magicians.

- Create your own effect - imagine your own e-book.

- read books about magic (not about the tricks)



Hope that helped

Andy


This is wonderful advice! Thanks!
here2009
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Regular user
140 Posts

Profile of here2009
Learn to unlearn. Get rid of that huge number of effects and get it down to 5-10. These 5-10 need to be very enjoyable to you and soon you will become a master at them.
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