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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Close-up: Sitting or Standing (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Robert Kohler
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Clearly there are different methods for performing close-up: Ammar tends to stand up, Schneider tends to sit down, etc. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. What are your thoughts? Should I craft my close-up act around one or the other? Currently I am switching once or twice for variety and it seems to work. But, that means I have to practice those effects as I am going to perform them. I do cups and balls standing, but coins sitting. So, it is very scripted and not as flexible as it looks. It does add a bit of apparent spontaneity which is the goal. Like everything else, I comes back to your style and what is comfortable - what is good for you? Here I am not talking about strolling, walk around, table hopping, etc. - strictly stationary close-up..............
We judge ourselves by our intentions - others judge us by our actions.....
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Bill Palmer
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I am seldom in a performing situation where I can sit, so I do all of my close-up work standing.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
Whit Haydn
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I am in the same position, Bill.
curlyclimber222
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Personally I fell really restricted when sitting. When standing I have the freedom to move, even though its not far when doing close up. It's just much more comfortable to stand. Also, when you are doing tricks seated then you need a table. When standing, having the table is optional.

Ben Winter
Bill Palmer
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One big advantage of performing while standing is that if your spectators are sitting, you are in a position of psychological power.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
graywolf
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I have never had a gig where I could sit down.Been performing since 1978.Good luck..Cordially,Howard
Josh the Superfluous
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If you do lapping, standing is too noisy and not as deceptive.
What do you want in a site? "Honesty, integrity and decency." -Mike Doogan
"I hate it, I hate my ironic lovechild. I didn't even have anything to do with it" Josh #2
Jonathan Townsend
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I have never been at a party where it was possible much less appropriate to sit myself at a table and hold court.

As much as I like the sit-down tricks that some have invented I have rarely had occasion to do them as written outside my home or at a restaurant with only couple of people watching.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Robert Kohler
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Interesting - so much for the many moves that involve lapping and lap steals.........
We judge ourselves by our intentions - others judge us by our actions.....
<BR>
<BR>B. Wilson
ShawnB
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Quote:
On 2007-04-04 09:50, Robert Kohler wrote:
Interesting - so much for the many moves that involve lapping and lap steals.........


Not if you have the right kind of servante.. I created a servante that I can perform
lap steals from....It is essentally a shoulder bad attched to the end of my table. The inside of the bad has some flex-metal sewn in to it to keep its shape in an open
position and the inside is lined with felt. I then cut a rather large whole in the bag and attached a half peice of tupperwear on to the bag with the same flex metal... I then took the lining and glued it to the inside of the tupperwear. The result is when I drop a coin in to a certain area of my servante it is "served" right back to me in the dish... Now I just come up with some moticvation or misdirection to reach down below my table and I am good to go...

Have fun with it...
Shawn
Shawn.
Bill Palmer
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A "shoulder bad"? What is a shoulder bad?

You have to structure your material around your own performing situation, not Slydini's or anyone else's. While you lose lapping, you gain other things -- topiting, for example. Everything you do requires a choice.

I have a friend who decided that since he never had the performing situation he wanted when he did close-up, he would build a "close up theatre of magic." This had a good sized table with a padded top, all the gadgets, etc. built in, lights, sound system, chairs for volunteers, everything. But it was unwieldy. There were some rooms it would not work in because if the height of the unit. He had lost sight of what makes close-up magic what it actually is. I think he believed that close-up magic was what we see performed at conventions to audiences of 300-400 people at once.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
David French
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Hello All,

I work mostly resturants and private parties and can sit many times in these venues. I actually sell a sit down, in the home show. I will sit at the homes dinning room or kitchen table. Everyone sits with me and/or gathers around. As long as the client knows what they are getting they never mind this set up. You merely sell the show this way. Anyway, it works for me.

David
FunTimeAl
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I used to work a restaurant (Buffalo Wild Wings) where I was the balloon artist and there was also a strolling magician. She would sit at every table. If it was a booth she would ask them to move over, if the table were full she would bring over a chair or bar stool.

At first I thought the practice was a bit odd, and imposing. However, she had many return customers and always got big laughs and applause at her tables.

I always tried to stay at the opposite end of the restaurant just to spread out the entertainment, so I never really heard much or her approach, routine, etc...

I guess it just depends on the person. I could never ask a patron to move over so I could sit down. It just wouldn't work for me. But, she seemed to do fine with it. So there ya go.
Scott F. Guinn
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I've done both. There are no absolutes. Most of my restaurant gigs were standing, but sometimes I could sit. I'm a big fan of using whatever is available. I, too, do close-up shows in homes seated (for adult parties, etc), although I'll typically do the first and last routines in those shows standing.

I subscribe to a statement Gary Ouellet made in "Close Up Illusions": Just because you can't ALWAYS do something doesn't mean you should NEVER do it!
"Love God, laugh more, spend more time with the ones you love, play with children, do good to those in need, and eat more ice cream. There is more to life than magic tricks." - Scott F. Guinn
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Dave V
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Quote:
On 2007-04-06 07:08, Chad wrote:
I used to work a restaurant (Buffalo Wild Wings) where I was the balloon artist and there was also a strolling magician. She would sit at every table. If it was a booth she would ask them to move over, if the table were full she would bring over a chair or bar stool.


I recall some casual restaurants (Buffalo Wild Wings might be one of them) where the servers routinely sit with the patrons as they take their order. It adds an air of intimacy and casualness.

A magician sitting next to someone might cause more troubles than it's worth (bad angles, flashing, etc...) but in a place like this it seems pulling up a chair or barstool would be perfectly acceptable.
No trees were killed in the making of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
ShawnB
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Quote:
On 2007-04-04 14:11, Bill Palmer wrote:
A "shoulder bad"? What is a shoulder bad?


I shoulder bag, Bill. Sorry for the miscommunication...

Shawn..
Shawn.
Michael Bilkis
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I have done both. For my "formal" close up show, I prefer sitting for most of it ala Goshman or Don Alan. BEing Vertically challenged there are some routines that I will stand for.
Jaz
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Since formal table close up was where I started it was my preference.
IMO it worked OK at house parties and smaller audiences of about a dozen people.

Just a thought and guessing that you not referring to restaurant performances..
If table magic is what you prefer and there are a lot of people then, if possible, you could set up in a different room and having small groups enter at half hour intervals for a 20 minute show.
One way to have this work is to have the host pass out your business cards. If there are 30 people then put a red dot on 10 biz cards, green on 10 cards, blue on 10 cards. After each show announce a different color dot group.
Otherwise a longer, more visible and stationary Parlor magic show may be more suitable.
You need to be flexible.

The height of most tables and chairs are not always comfortable for me when doing certain routines so like you I sat for some and stood for others. I really never really gave a lot of thought to 'scripting' these adjustments but did keep them to a minimum.
Pete Biro
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You can also, if the trick requires it, work on your hands and knees. My COINS THRU THE FLOOR is one. You get some guy you don't like to "run downstairs and catch the coins when they come through!" Smile
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Bill Palmer
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Quote:
On 2007-04-07 12:45, Jaz wrote:

Since formal table close up was where I started it was my preference.
IMO it worked OK at house parties and smaller audiences of about a dozen people.

Just a thought and guessing that you not referring to restaurant performances..
If table magic is what you prefer and there are a lot of people then, if possible, you could set up in a different room and having small groups enter at half hour intervals for a 20 minute show.
One way to have this work is to have the host pass out your business cards. If there are 30 people then put a red dot on 10 biz cards, green on 10 cards, blue on 10 cards. After each show announce a different color dot group.
Otherwise a longer, more visible and stationary Parlor magic show may be more suitable.
You need to be flexible.

The height of most tables and chairs are not always comfortable for me when doing certain routines so like you I sat for some and stood for others. I really never really gave a lot of thought to 'scripting' these adjustments but did keep them to a minimum.


If you are going to do formal table work at parties, it would be a good idea to invest in a table that you could bring with you to these events, so you don't have to worry about table height, etc. The same thing is true of what you sit on, whether it is a chair or a rolling stool (such as the Monti close-up stool).

If you consider your table to be part of your stage, then it makes sense to control this as much as possible.

Dividing an audience into halves or thirds might not fit in with other plans the host or hostess has for the group at the event.

The biggest bane of my existence when I was doing the social circuit was the singing telegram people. If you have a structured act, close-up or otherwise, that takes a particular length of time, an ill-timed singing telegram, strip-o-gram or other major interruption can really ruin your show.

There were three big singing telegram companies in Houston at one time. I finally had to make arrangements with party planners and singing telegram people to get them to tell me when this kind of thing was going to happen, so I could accommodate them.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
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