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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » All in the cards » » What's the best "Spectator cuts to the Aces" self working (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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sohaib
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John Bannon's Final Verdict is pretty much self-working, and very effective. I think it's one of the best of any of the Spectator Cuts to the Aces routines, and also one of the best card tricks you can do.
alannasser
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Someone above mentioned a David Regal spectator-cuts-to-the-aces effecvt. It's called Deep Guilt Aces and is very good. I use it all the time and they go nuts. Completely self-working. Gaffed deck. After the spec's cut-to aces are revealed, the magi shows that the cards right before (under) each of the aces is a different, indifferent card. The spectator can even turn over the different cards. The spectator could also turn over the aces, but I'd not advise it. This one is very good.

Best,
Alan
Ace of $pades
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I saw a very good one: Brad Kristian's four ace packet switch. I saw it on an ellusionist dvd but I forgot whih one. Ninja 1 maybe?
the fritz
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Gary Ouellet's "Three-Second Wonder" from 'Close-Up Illusions' is very easy to do and looks pretty amazing. I've seen Paul Cummins lecture and he produces the aces like this. I believe the genesis of Ouellet's version comes from Father Cyprian (I think he had a quick, self-working version of the trick in his book... although it may not have involved the spectator actually cutting). For spectator cutting to the aces, I think John Bannon's many versions (from 'Smoke & Mirrors' and 'Dear Mr. Fantasy') are the best.
Kex
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Bill Malone has a great version. Each spectator is trying to cut to the highest valued card. In the end all four aces are turned over at once resulting in a tie. always found the last ace to be anticlimatic and this seems to rectify that. Any other suggestions for the fourth ace?
Scott Cram
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"From Nowhere" in Peter Duffie's "Effortless Card Magic" and "Cardboard Keyboard" from "Pasteboard Presentations II" are my favorites.

The effects are a little different, however.

In Cardboard Keyboard, the spectator cuts the deck, and four random cards are seen at those locations. With some simple rhythmic rearrangements of single cards (done as if you're playing a piano, thus the name), you show all the aces are now to be found on top of those packets.

From Nowhere is clean and simple. The spectators will swear that they cut to the aces, as there is very little handling by you. Besides using it to produce a 4-of-a-kind, you could also use it to produce any 5 card arrangement, such as a Royal Flush. It will even let you retain small set-ups on the top or bottom of the deck, if you plan right.
MagicT
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Check M.I.N.T. for Marlo's extensive work on this plot.



Trini
Trini Montes
cardfreakhk
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There are tons of versions and methods for this classic plot!

I have been using Harry Lorayne's one mostly.
He has many versions, I forgot the name of this one, but it is very bold, and very effective.

You cut 13 cards and ask your audience to try to do the same, oops you seem to cut too many so you take back 2... anyone with me?
Don't just dream, stay awake and action!
Harry Lorayne
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Cardfreakhk: You're referring (I think) to my Double Take, out of QUANTUM LEAPS. But, if you're really saying "Oops, and coming back with two cards" that's not right. The idea is to just do it, and ACT as if you're coming back with (no one knows how many) cards because the packet is too large. It's an acting thing and not to be called attention to. I'm happy that you're using it, it's a strong version of spec-cuts-aces. Best - HARRY LORAYNE.
[email]harrylorayne@earthlink.net[/email]

http://www.harrylorayne.com
http://www.harryloraynemagic.com
cardfreakhk
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Wow! Mr. Harry! I met you in London many years ago.
Of course we don't actually SAY it, we ACT it.
I am sorry I always forget trick names... but I do perform them.
Is this one called Double Take? Thanks a lot for reminding me!

It is very bold and very very effective!
I always slide the 4 Aces down from the packets leaving the impression that each Ace does really come from different pile of cards.

Most magicians always look for a lot more CLEAN versions for themselves, but underlook some strong lovely handling like this one.

Best - Michael
Don't just dream, stay awake and action!
dylan magic
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Shuffling lesson-chad long, its in art of astonishment volume three.
also as mentiond above john bannon has a great section covering this in his dear mr fantasy book.
yankeeprez
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Quote:
On 2007-05-30 00:20, Rennie wrote:
David Regal has a great one, cannot remember the name of it, anyone ?
Rennie


I believe that you are refering to David Rega's Guilt Luck Aces.

Also, Shigeo Takagi has a cut to the aces effect in The Miracles of Shigeo Takagi by Richard Kaufman. In my opinion, it is somewhat "balsy." Just by reading the effect you wouldn't expect anyone to fall for it, but after doing it many times, with the proper misdirection, it is a real killer!

Noah
Review King
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I searched and searched and tried so many methods. I finaly settled on Bill Malone's version called "Cut ’Em High and Tie" from his "On The Loose" DVD volume #2.

It uses multiple specators ( gets more people involved ) and the ending gets big laughs and amazement.
"Of all words of tongue and pen,
the saddest are, "It might have been"

..........John Greenleaf Whittier
Mcdermott
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One of my frav's and a hidden gem can be found in Marlo in the united kingdom , an excellent booklet published by paul gordon and natzler press.

It's a little lengthy , but is a real magican fooler..
EndersGame
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As has already been mentioned, you'll find this effect in RRTCM:
"A Poker Player's Picnic" in Hugard's Royal Road to Card Magic p.16.

But you'll find the same effect described in many other places, as a self-working trick, including these sources:
"Cutting to the Aces", Tom Ogden's Complete Idiot’s Guide, p.111
"Women's Lib", Garcia & Schindler's Magic With Cards, p.48
"The Weigle Aces", John Scarne's Scarne on Card Tricks, p.58

Tom Ogden claims that the trick was invented by Steve Belchou, written up by Oscar Weigle and first published in The Dragon Magazine in 1939.

There are a few interesting touches to think about with respect to the handling:

1. Although it is self-working, it can be made more astonishing with the help of false shuffling at the beginning of the trick, and keeping the aces on top. There is a video where Bill Malone demonstrates the trick with false shuffling. When you first see him performing it, it seems very impressive, but maybe that's partly because there's an expectation it will good because it's being performed by Bill! False shuffling certainly adds to the effect, however.

2. Garcia and Schindler suggest using Queens instead of Aces, and introducing the final revelation by saying "This is called the Women's Lib trick. The reason is simple. In this trick, the women always come out on top." Interesting patter to consider.

3. Weigle (as explained by John Scarne) offers a slight twist at the end. The original stack includes a 3-spot, and instead of turning up an Ace on the final pile, the 3 spot is revealed, and the spectator counts down three to find the final Ace.

Is Weigle's suggestion an improvement? I'm not sure, it could take away from the simplicity and elegance of the original effect by introducing needless complexity. On the other hand, some have suggested that turning up the final Ace is anti-climactic. This provides an interesting twist, after it seems that the performer has made a mistake, and so perhaps deserves consideration.
Larry Davidson
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The most direct-appearing method I've ever seen was shown to me by Jack Birnman back in the day. The spectator cuts the deck and turns over the four top cards himself, revealing the four aces.
EndersGame
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How should the dealing out of three cards under each pile and on the other three piles be explained and rationalized? Some different approaches are suggested in the different sources I've looked at:

a) Garcia and Schindler suggest having the spectator do this work, and that this is just a method to "mix the cards quite thoroughly." Having the spectator do the handling has the advantage of making the end result more startling, because it eliminates the possibility of sleight of hand by the magician during this "mixing". Hugard suggests doing the same.

b) Bill Malone's version requires sleight of hand (Cut 'em High & Tie), so it is not self-working, but the presentation is interesting in that he has four spectators cutting the packets, and presents it as a contest to see who can draw the highest card. It's a great presentation, and is there any reason it couldn't be adapted for the self-working trick?

c) Paul Wilson (in his video series on RRTCM) suggests having the performer introduce the mixing by saying "Let's take a random number, say `three'..." and looking at a spectator to give the impression they suggested this number.

d) Ogden suggests introducing the mixing as something called a "Mississippi shuffle" that the magician supposedly has learned from an old riverboat gambler.

e) Hugard suggests that at the conclusion of the trick you should emphasize that the assistant cut the cards but do not mention that he moved cards about, because you want them to forget this part of the trick.

Ogden and Hugard's approaches are quite opposite. By calling it a Mississippi Shuffle, Ogden effectively draws attention to the rearranging of cards, whereas Hugard recommends doing it in a way so that the rearranging of cards will be forgotten at the end of the trick. Any thoughts as to which method of presentation will psychologically create a stronger effect for the spectator?
Paul H
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Hi Gregory,

The approach I use is an elaboration of the Garcia and Schindler idea. I like to pretend the chosen spectator might be a 'dark horse' when it comes to card handling. Employing best casino practices, I employ another spectator or two as security to 'monitor' the cutting of the deck into four packets. The cards are then mixed to prevent cheating. With careful management its possible to get the security team to join in and instruct the spectator on the number of cards to be mixed and dealt. I have had some great reactions with this bit of theater.

Hello Larry,

If I may ask, is the Birnman ace cutting routine 'self working' and, more importantly, is it in print? Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Paul H
the fritz
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Hello all,

I have recently rediscovered a trick called Ultra Match-Up which can be found in New Self-Working Card Tricks. It isn't an ace-cutting routine per se, but it is an impromptu way of finding four-of-a-kind from a shuffled deck and in the end, the effect is similar to a spectator cutting the aces. Best of all, it's self-working and impromptu.
Illusion & Beyond
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I use a setup from 50 Modern Card Tricks. Simple, impromptu, and the spec does all the cutting. I have found a lot of little gems out of this book.
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