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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Stage mentalism show (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Erdnase27
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Ye I think I skipp mother of all booktest and use that for different settings. I think I'm quite good at selling a effect. I think I put the effects together with a logic. I want to show people aspects of mentalism like:
preditcions, real time thught reading, psychological "games" like bank night, metal bending, abilities a spectator has(blindsight) . well that was the logic I had anyway while making this set months ago.
Malchat
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I think your timing is off. I estimate the original list plays at 75 minutes and I'm being generous... unless you plan to have 20 minutes of dead time while people move on and off stage.

For the sake and sanity of your audience, I seriously recommend going for a shorter, tighter set.

PM me and I'll help - but it may not be what you want to hear.
“You are what you pretend to be.”
tctahoe
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I would like to ask and so I will… for what size of audience?
JasonLinett
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Note to self... never post your show on Magic Café...
Erdnase27
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Aah I can handle feedback quite well Smile so no probem here. I only hope it makes me a better performer Smile
RileyG
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Quote:
On 2007-11-21 16:03, MichielTummers wrote:
remember this is not something I came up with last night and bought. I have several objects for some years but the step from magic to mentalism is not something you do in 1 day. Also I have several backups should the lighting not be good and god knows what Smile another few points. the routines I paid much money for I'm not likely to drop Smile


Eleven long effect...!!!! The show will be over two hours long... Way to long... I would go with just seven effects at the max...

Also, money paid for things means nothing... If that were the case then x-wifes and girlfriends would still be living with me and others in the field for the prices we paid for them... Cut the fat and develop a 20 minutes routine and then build from there to a full evening show... From the show you have outlined you are some sort of super psychic, and most people only do two or three different areas of the paranormal, and not all known to man...
Signed,
Riley G Matthews Jr
SAG-AFTRA actor
Www.RileyG.com
Erdnase27
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Quote:
On 2007-11-21 17:40, RileyG wrote:
Quote:
On 2007-11-21 16:03, MichielTummers wrote:
remember this is not something I came up with last night and bought. I have several objects for some years but the step from magic to mentalism is not something you do in 1 day. Also I have several backups should the lighting not be good and god knows what Smile another few points. the routines I paid much money for I'm not likely to drop Smile


Eleven long effect...!!!! The show will be over two hours long... Way to long... I would go with just seven effects at the max...

Also, money paid for things means nothing... If that were the case then x-wifes and girlfriends would still be living with me and others in the field for the prices we paid for them... Cut the fat and develop a 20 minutes routine and then build from there to a full evening show... From the show you have outlined you are some sort of super psychic, and most people only do two or three different areas of the paranormal, and not all known to man...


I'm trying to do that right now. I think youre right Smile
mindsynced
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Best of luck with your show. It is hard to get a feel for you, your performance style or connectivity with just a list. You, better than all others, know your strengths and what will please an audience. Be yourself, keep entertainment a priority and you will be fine.
Take care,
Keith
Keith Brown
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www.keithbrownentertainment.com

"Making Magical Memories~Teaching Biblical Truth"
www.keithbrown.org
Rosemary
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Quote:

PM me and I'll help - but it may not be what you want to hear.


Do PM me too to tell me what he doesn't want to hear. I'm curious what is wrong with his list.
Erdnase27
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Smile it is ok I am practising mentalism anyway:) I don't say to know it all. I'm kinda newbie with mentalism. but I wont perform until I get it all eprfect(even if it takes years Smile) I am very critical to myself and its never good Smile

but I thought it was a nice list of effects. I still do. although I now think I could lay focus on one thing instead of like all paranormal abilities in the world Smile(im dutch so my english is crap Smile)
Rosemary
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Honestly,
you say you won't perform until it's perfect. This doens't make sense, because you will never get it perfect unless you actually try it out in front of real people.
You probably mean you want to wait until you feel you are ready, which is a good thing. But you can only grow from experience.
Erdnase27
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Agreed. ive several years of experience with magic. not with mentalism though. I do small effects in bars etc so I know how to sell it(its different as with magic Smile) . but you r right .. until I feel I'm ready I remain practising etc.
Rosemary
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But, to practice mentalism, you have to read somebody else's mind, no. Unless you amuse yourself by reading your own Smile (but, frankly, that's just called "thinking", not "mentalism") Smile
Erdnase27
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I'm quite good at reading my own mind!!! Smile Smile

I DO perform mentalism but not in the context of a show yet. that's how I mean it:P
joshlondon17
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Michiel,

A few things I was wondering and think you'll gain a bit of insight to yourself:

I noticed things on your list that anyone can buy at any online shop and put in a show. What makes YOUR presentation/show worthy of being watched?

Just buying tricks and knowing how do do them does not make you a mentalist?

Do you realize the impact your going to have on your audience if you perform all those tricks? They will most likely think that your "show" is a magic dealer demo.

What effects are you going to do that you actually took time...serious time, to rehearse, script and perform for people?

Do you own a mentalism/magic book?

And, I feel most importantly...Why are you even doing a mentalism show?

These are serious questions you need to know to perform anything, magic or mentalism. And don't say to yourself, "I've been doing magic for a while and I am quite good in my mind. And all my friends love my tricks." Because 5 years of magic is not enough time to do a show that is worthy of being bought.

Josh London
Mind Guerrilla
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I'm new to the Café and this has got me wondering whether there is a thread somewhere dedicated to the routining of a mentalism act.

Thanks, in advance, for the information.
Terry Holley
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Michiel:

You've got to start somewhere, so go for it. But I echo those who suggest that this is a loooong show you are planning - especially for your first time out!

Terry
Co-author with illusionist Andre' Kole of "Astrology and Psychic Phenomena."
darrylasher
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I have never done a full mentalism show, but I have done stage shows of 75 to 90 minutes. It is a lot of work. Things will happen that you never imagined, and things will go wrong that you thought never could. You may very likely get "lost" at some point in the show, not knowing what you are supposed to do or say next. I'm not trying to scare you, but just to help you be aware so you can try to prevent it from happening if at all possible.

I'll let others discuss the specific effects, but from the "show" viewpoint, here are some things to keep in mind to get through a long performance as smoothly as possible:

ORGANIZATION: Make a written list of every prop and gimmick you will use, where it will be, and where it will end up. If you need to use a marker, you need to KNOW it's in your right jacket pocket without even thinking about it. Nothing will make you look and FEEL unpolished faster than fumbling around for your next prop. Just as important, but often overlooked is knowing where you will put each item when you are done with it. If that is not rehearsed thoroughly, you will interfere with items you need later. You may also need some items in specific places to help you ditch or obtain unseen gimmicks. Practice the entire act as a whole, and write down notes about where each item works best. Good planning is the first step to good showmanship. Good planning gives you confidence, and confidence is essential to any performance, but especially mentalism.

VOLUNTEER HANDLING: Along with planning of props, PLAN and WRITE DOWN how you will deal with volunteers. KNOW how you will recruit each one and KNOW exactly where they will stand or sit, and KNOW exactly when they will return to their seats and how they will get there. DO NOT make it up as you go along. When figuring out where they will be, keep in mind where the needed props will be, and whether it matters which side of your body is toward the audience, for example if you need to ditch or acquire something secretly. In a sense, plan the volunteer handling just as you would handling props. KNOW where they will come from, how they will be used, and where they will end up.

STARTING EACH ROUTINE: MEMORIZE your opening words for each effect so you are not left searching for words. The very first words of the very first routine are especially important. If you are saying something to introduce yourself, know exactly what it will be, and rehearse it, out loud, over and over. Also, WRITE IT DOWN where you can see it as you perform. Nothing causes instant amnesia faster than looking out at a sea of faces who are waiting to hear what you have to say. So, know what you will say without even thinking about it. Knowing how you will introduce each routine is important as well. Variety in the start of each routine is essential (more about variety later). DO NOT fall into the "for my next experiment" trap. Start each routine with a different kind of introduction. For example, in a 5 routine show, you may use the following:
1- I'd like to show you something that science has not been able to explain...
2- Have you ever had a dream so real, you didn't know if you were asleep or awake?
3- When I was a child, my grandfather was the most important person in my life. One day, we went fishing, and he told me an interesting story...
4- I used to love coloring in coloring books when I was a kid. My favorite color was red, so I tried to scribble red on every page, paying no attention to the lines...
5- Sometimes, when you are very quiet, you may hear things in the back of your mind that you would never tell anyone about...

These are just off the top of my head, but the point is to start with something that grabs attention. The spectators respond with curiosity, or intrigue, or they look inside themselves, or they picture something in their minds. You can see the grandfather and the child fishing, for example, and you can see the red scribbled coloring book. Mentalism is inherently visually bland in most cases, so your patter has to be all that more compelling.

PACING VARIETY: Variety is ESSENTIAL in any performance, but especially in a long one. Follow a slower paced routine with one that you can go through at a faster pace. You may even speak more quickly in one routine than in the next. Make sure it matches the effect, but think through how you can vary your pacing. You can also vary pacing within a routine. For example, in a book test, you might do the choice of book and word somewhat quickly, then deliberately slow down before revealing the word. In an effect where you reveal that you predicted several cards, you may go slower in the selection process, then reveal the numerous predictions in rapid succession. These choices of pacing must be deliberate, planned, and rehearsed.

VISUAL VARIETY: Look for ways to structure the show so that routines have a variety of visually interest. For example, one effect may fill the stage with volunteers and easels of drawings. So follow that one with an effect where you are alone on stage, restricted to a confined area. Follow an effect that uses large props with an effect that used small props or no props. Follow an effect with a lot of motion with an effect with little motion. All of these things keep interest although the spectators may not consciously be aware of it. Also think about what play and movie directors call "blocking." Where will you stand for each routine? When will you move from one place to the other? Some areas of the stage (or performing area) are stronger than others. Any time I did a stage performance I made a drawing of the stage and probes, and diagrammed where I started, where I moved to, and where I ended up. A simple "trick" can be turned into a real performance by how you use the space available. Along the same lines, practice how you will stand. That's always important, but especially in a long show. If you don't consistently stand properly, you will end up swaying and shifting just to keep your feet from getting tired.

AUDIBLE VARIETY: Just like visual variety, audible variety is essential, both within effects and from one effect to the next. Within a routine, vary your speech to make the most impact. Some things may be spoken loudly and others at a near whisper. Also, do not be afraid of silence. Sometimes saying nothing is the best communication of all. If you say something that needs time to sink in, pause afterwards to allow the audience to repeat it in their heads. Don't be afraid to repeat it yourself as well. You may speak louder in some routines than others. Look through your set and see which routines work better at different volumes. Again, this should be deliberate and planned. You can always make adjustments during performance, but start with a plan.

PROFESSIONALISM: What sets a professional apart from someone who knows a few tricks? What will make your performance any different than someone who does card tricks at a friend's party? There are many things, but at the top of the list is PLANNING. A professional knows exactly what they are doing next. A professional knows exactly how to segue from one routine to the next. A professional knows exactly where everything is and where it's going, and doesn't waste the spectators' time while he fumbles around with props and searches through his pockets. Leave no doubt whatsoever that you are a professional by planning, practicing, rehearsing, and then KNOWING exactly what you are doing and how the audience will respond.

PREPARE TO FAIL: Part of being a pro is KNOWING exactly what you will do when something goes wrong. At some point, something will fail. Maybe not this show, but maybe the next. Think about how to respond and write it down. Write down a general "failure script" as well as a "failure script" for EACH effect. One true mark of a pro is how you respond when things don't work, and move on to the next thing, and keep the audience on your side.

Sorry if this was too rambling, but I hope you get a few good things out of it. Good luck! Feel free to PM if you have any questions. I'm not sure how often I'll check this thread, so I might miss something you leave here without PMing.

Cheers!
Darryl
rbattle
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Great post Darryl. So many things that takes years for some of us to discover and some have yet to discover. Much more is involved than just learning enough tricks.

Thanks

Robert
Erdnase27
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Quote:
On 2007-11-24 18:46, joshlondon17 wrote:
Michiel,

A few things I was wondering and think you'll gain a bit of insight to yourself:

I noticed things on your list that anyone can buy at any online shop and put in a show. What makes YOUR presentation/show worthy of being watched?

Just buying tricks and knowing how do do them does not make you a mentalist?

Do you realize the impact your going to have on your audience if you perform all those tricks? They will most likely think that your "show" is a magic dealer demo.

What effects are you going to do that you actually took time...serious time, to rehearse, script and perform for people?

Do you own a mentalism/magic book?

And, I feel most importantly...Why are you even doing a mentalism show?

These are serious questions you need to know to perform anything, magic or mentalism. And don't say to yourself, "I've been doing magic for a while and I am quite good in my mind. And all my friends love my tricks." Because 5 years of magic is not enough time to do a show that is worthy of being bought.

Josh London


first of all thanks for the reaction and the time you took for it. let me elaborate on them:
about first part:
ofcourse everybody can buy those things. everybody buys them. everybody uses PK touches also. With everybody I mean ofcourse mentalists and magicians. I don't get this part(maybe because I'm not english). ofcourse the effects themself stood the test of time AND I switched rewrote and refined handlings and ideas to suit me so I don't copy them(i don't want to be a 2nd banachek or a 2nd max maven , nomatter how much I like them).

second part: where am I claiming that? copy paste please. ps. I'm fully aware of this.

third part: I wonder why they would think that. because theyre widely available? so they think osterlind show is a magic demo because he uses effects that are widely available? hmmmz ok ok I'm not comparing myself with osterlind(nor do I want too) but isn't this something that counts for everybody? Also, I think that laymen never saw the effects in the first place and the things I use are things I bought in normal shops and office stores. they don't scream MAGIC at all.

fourth part: I scripted everything, I rehearse hours every day(still do), I refined handlings to suit me and yes this takes some time(remember going to each segment and studied it how it might suit you, a thing I got from the great book: strong magic).First of all if I wasn't clear: I don't do mentalism for like 2 weeks but for some years. I only never had a stage show with it. Maybe I made the impression of quickly buying dozens of effects and DVD's but this is not the case.

fifth part: what does this have to do with the show. for the record YES I own many mentalism dvd's and books(13 steps, osterlind dvd's etc etc)

6th part: for the same reason everybody else does a mentalism show. I want to connect with the audience on a deeper level then I can do with magic(yes connect with the audience not doing it for myself[in a way I do it for myself but in context of a show well you know what I mean Smile)
:D

about the length: yes its gonna be shorter.
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