The Magic Caf
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Stage mentalism show (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3
Erdnase27
View Profile
Inner circle
2505 Posts

Profile of Erdnase27
And btw daryl
thanks for your great post(all thanks btw)
psychicturtle
View Profile
Special user
UK
821 Posts

Profile of psychicturtle
I would just like to add/repeat from a different view point that just like a baby, a show will grow, change and develop.
I found that almost all of my scripting changed quite dramatically for each effect after a few performances, and that some peices just weren't as strong as I thought they were with my character, and that other things didn't suit me.

I have done a lot of shows and continue to do a lot of shows for free (community groups, elderly peoples groups, retired workers groups etc.) because you can try risky and new pieces without the pressure of the booker wanting it all to go really smoothly.
For example, I have new piece I had been working on and mentally rehearsing for months. I tried it, and found two things that needed making more secure, and I also had to restructure the revelation. I am very pleased that I didn't do it as it was for a paying audience! Now, it is much better, and it is ready for my paid act.

And you can get free publicity for those kind of shows too.
Chad Sanborn
View Profile
Inner circle
my fingers hurt from typing,
2206 Posts

Profile of Chad Sanborn
I think that you should do the show the way you want to! You know you better than me or anyone else on this board. The worst thing that can happen is the show is a bust and noone likes it. Oh well. Learn from the mistakes you made and fix them. Then book another show and put in the changes to see how it plays. Trial and error is the only way a show can develope and evolve. It doesn't matter how much you practice at home, things will always be different in real time. Be ready for them, smile, and have fun!

Chad
mesmer
View Profile
Inner circle
1186 Posts

Profile of mesmer
Quote:
On 2007-11-21 16:33, MichielTummers wrote:
Its for 1.5 hour. 1 hour and 3 quarters.



for this time line....I can do it with three...max Four Effect....but with Lots and Lots of Audience Participation that involve the WHOLE audience

if you do that many effects you will NOT be able to Paint a Clear image in the Audience mind beside you are doing....errrr.....many and lots of things

believe me...if you Start to script your Act on paper and THEN recording your ACT on camera....you may be able to look at it in different light

and also you are doing variation upon variation of the same effect...let me break it down

here is your list:

Mind Reading/Telephaty
4. korutsuke
5. Booktests :
a) mother of all booktests
b) Dracula Booktest & Errata ending
6. ODDS Drawing Duplication
7. Question and Answer act
11. as a finisher a magic square routine. I use it with a thought transmitter

Prediction Effect:
1.number prediction
2. Bank night
10. Human Phone Book by Bob Kohler

Miscelania Effect:
3. Pk touch "routine' (no I wont call it a routine as done by criss angel )
8. Metalbending (duh )
9. Blindsight

lets take Mind Reading/Telephaty for expample.....

why your do Kurotsuke which only 1 out of 5 if you can guess a word from a thousand that came from a random book?

or.....

why do you do Booktest if you can just read a mind and Duplicate a Drawing wcih only came from someone imagination instead of a pile of BOOkS?

or.....

why you do Drawing Dupe if you can just do Q&A Routine?.......

how bout ....

number prediction VS Bank night VS Human Phone Book by Bob Kohler

wich one is the most ideal effects that looks as real as it gets??????

I could go on and on.....

but hey...that's just me!
Erdnase27
View Profile
Inner circle
2505 Posts

Profile of Erdnase27
Quote:
On 2007-11-25 21:56, Chad Sanborn wrote:
I think that you should do the show the way you want to! You know you better than me or anyone else on this board. The worst thing that can happen is the show is a bust and noone likes it. Oh well. Learn from the mistakes you made and fix them. Then book another show and put in the changes to see how it plays. Trial and error is the only way a show can develope and evolve. It doesn't matter how much you practice at home, things will always be different in real time. Be ready for them, smile, and have fun!

Chad


chad, this is exactly the way I see it. ANyway ive shortened the show big time. Thanks for the post
Erdnase27
View Profile
Inner circle
2505 Posts

Profile of Erdnase27
Mesmer I'm thinking now of:
1. banknight
2. pk touches
3. ODDS drawing duplication
4. MoaB
5. Metal bending
6. Question and answer act as finisher

something in the like of this.
brainchild
View Profile
Loyal user
Ideological Bigot
259 Posts

Profile of brainchild
Quote:
On 2007-11-24 20:47, darrylasher wrote:
I have never done a full mentalism show, but I have done stage shows of 75 to 90 minutes. It is a lot of work. Things will happen that you never imagined, and things will go wrong that you thought never could. You may very likely get "lost" at some point in the show, not knowing what you are supposed to do or say next. I'm not trying to scare you, but just to help you be aware so you can try to prevent it from happening if at all possible.

I'll let others discuss the specific effects, but from the "show" viewpoint, here are some things to keep in mind to get through a long performance as smoothly as possible:

ORGANIZATION: Make a written list of every prop and gimmick you will use, where it will be, and where it will end up. If you need to use a marker, you need to KNOW it's in your right jacket pocket without even thinking about it. Nothing will make you look and FEEL unpolished faster than fumbling around for your next prop. Just as important, but often overlooked is knowing where you will put each item when you are done with it. If that is not rehearsed thoroughly, you will interfere with items you need later. You may also need some items in specific places to help you ditch or obtain unseen gimmicks. Practice the entire act as a whole, and write down notes about where each item works best. Good planning is the first step to good showmanship. Good planning gives you confidence, and confidence is essential to any performance, but especially mentalism.

VOLUNTEER HANDLING: Along with planning of props, PLAN and WRITE DOWN how you will deal with volunteers. KNOW how you will recruit each one and KNOW exactly where they will stand or sit, and KNOW exactly when they will return to their seats and how they will get there. DO NOT make it up as you go along. When figuring out where they will be, keep in mind where the needed props will be, and whether it matters which side of your body is toward the audience, for example if you need to ditch or acquire something secretly. In a sense, plan the volunteer handling just as you would handling props. KNOW where they will come from, how they will be used, and where they will end up.

STARTING EACH ROUTINE: MEMORIZE your opening words for each effect so you are not left searching for words. The very first words of the very first routine are especially important. If you are saying something to introduce yourself, know exactly what it will be, and rehearse it, out loud, over and over. Also, WRITE IT DOWN where you can see it as you perform. Nothing causes instant amnesia faster than looking out at a sea of faces who are waiting to hear what you have to say. So, know what you will say without even thinking about it. Knowing how you will introduce each routine is important as well. Variety in the start of each routine is essential (more about variety later). DO NOT fall into the "for my next experiment" trap. Start each routine with a different kind of introduction. For example, in a 5 routine show, you may use the following:
1- I'd like to show you something that science has not been able to explain...
2- Have you ever had a dream so real, you didn't know if you were asleep or awake?
3- When I was a child, my grandfather was the most important person in my life. One day, we went fishing, and he told me an interesting story...
4- I used to love coloring in coloring books when I was a kid. My favorite color was red, so I tried to scribble red on every page, paying no attention to the lines...
5- Sometimes, when you are very quiet, you may hear things in the back of your mind that you would never tell anyone about...

These are just off the top of my head, but the point is to start with something that grabs attention. The spectators respond with curiosity, or intrigue, or they look inside themselves, or they picture something in their minds. You can see the grandfather and the child fishing, for example, and you can see the red scribbled coloring book. Mentalism is inherently visually bland in most cases, so your patter has to be all that more compelling.

PACING VARIETY: Variety is ESSENTIAL in any performance, but especially in a long one. Follow a slower paced routine with one that you can go through at a faster pace. You may even speak more quickly in one routine than in the next. Make sure it matches the effect, but think through how you can vary your pacing. You can also vary pacing within a routine. For example, in a book test, you might do the choice of book and word somewhat quickly, then deliberately slow down before revealing the word. In an effect where you reveal that you predicted several cards, you may go slower in the selection process, then reveal the numerous predictions in rapid succession. These choices of pacing must be deliberate, planned, and rehearsed.

VISUAL VARIETY: Look for ways to structure the show so that routines have a variety of visually interest. For example, one effect may fill the stage with volunteers and easels of drawings. So follow that one with an effect where you are alone on stage, restricted to a confined area. Follow an effect that uses large props with an effect that used small props or no props. Follow an effect with a lot of motion with an effect with little motion. All of these things keep interest although the spectators may not consciously be aware of it. Also think about what play and movie directors call "blocking." Where will you stand for each routine? When will you move from one place to the other? Some areas of the stage (or performing area) are stronger than others. Any time I did a stage performance I made a drawing of the stage and probes, and diagrammed where I started, where I moved to, and where I ended up. A simple "trick" can be turned into a real performance by how you use the space available. Along the same lines, practice how you will stand. That's always important, but especially in a long show. If you don't consistently stand properly, you will end up swaying and shifting just to keep your feet from getting tired.

AUDIBLE VARIETY: Just like visual variety, audible variety is essential, both within effects and from one effect to the next. Within a routine, vary your speech to make the most impact. Some things may be spoken loudly and others at a near whisper. Also, do not be afraid of silence. Sometimes saying nothing is the best communication of all. If you say something that needs time to sink in, pause afterwards to allow the audience to repeat it in their heads. Don't be afraid to repeat it yourself as well. You may speak louder in some routines than others. Look through your set and see which routines work better at different volumes. Again, this should be deliberate and planned. You can always make adjustments during performance, but start with a plan.

PROFESSIONALISM: What sets a professional apart from someone who knows a few tricks? What will make your performance any different than someone who does card tricks at a friend's party? There are many things, but at the top of the list is PLANNING. A professional knows exactly what they are doing next. A professional knows exactly how to segue from one routine to the next. A professional knows exactly where everything is and where it's going, and doesn't waste the spectators' time while he fumbles around with props and searches through his pockets. Leave no doubt whatsoever that you are a professional by planning, practicing, rehearsing, and then KNOWING exactly what you are doing and how the audience will respond.

PREPARE TO FAIL: Part of being a pro is KNOWING exactly what you will do when something goes wrong. At some point, something will fail. Maybe not this show, but maybe the next. Think about how to respond and write it down. Write down a general "failure script" as well as a "failure script" for EACH effect. One true mark of a pro is how you respond when things don't work, and move on to the next thing, and keep the audience on your side.

Sorry if this was too rambling, but I hope you get a few good things out of it. Good luck! Feel free to PM if you have any questions. I'm not sure how often I'll check this thread, so I might miss something you leave here without PMing.

Cheers!
Darryl


Wow. Great post Darryl. Very insightful. I agree with your ideas about planning. It is a major aspect of what sets apart a professional in almost every craft. Thankfully not everyone knows that. Smile
mesmer
View Profile
Inner circle
1186 Posts

Profile of mesmer
Or you could just get "Maximum Entertainment by Ken Weber"

about the selection of effect rather than doing it like this:
1. banknight
2. pk touches
3. ODDS drawing duplication
4. MoaB
5. Metal bending
6. Question and answer act as finisher

if me...I will doing it like this:

1. Question and answer act as Opener (why: you are on stage and you establish yourself quickly that you are a Mind Reader and you can do this effect without any spectator on stage, just like Jhon Edward)

2.Metal bending (why: visualy unique, since you just open with a Q&A act wich the effect happens in the Audience mind, now its time to spice up your act little bit by giving them visual stuff)

3.pk touches (the same type of effect with Metal Bending, i.e: Demonstration of another variation of PK Power, instead with spoon, now you do it with people)

4.End with Human Phone Number (why: now you have 8-9 people on stage, this is to give the illusion that you are using lots of people in your show and involving the whole Audience, and finish this with a Group Bow, ask each Volunteer to hold hand together with you and the other Volunteer and then take your BIG bow together)

FIN!

with this you just only demonstarte ONLY 3 MENTAL POWER

1-Telephaty
2-Psikokinesis
3-Prediction/Influence

I suggest you drop the BankNite (for god sake it's only one out of five...what so Great about that? since you do the Human Phone Number wich is stronger than Bank Nite)

drop the Drawing Dupe since you do Q&A,....or better yet you can include the Drawing Dupe in the Q&A routine to give it more visual edge to it

and drop the MOABT...yes I know its expensive Booktest...but in your Q&A routine you can read people mind without any props WHY USE BOOK?

Whewww!.....let me catch my breath
Erdnase27
View Profile
Inner circle
2505 Posts

Profile of Erdnase27
That's why I go to small to big. I open with bank night because it gets me comfortable and the audience in the mood.

everytime it gets more impressive. at the end I do a big question and answer act as most recommended it as a closer. I think its too long for an opening effect and too formal, it should be the highlight of the show.
joshlondon17
View Profile
Special user
San Diego, CA
685 Posts

Profile of joshlondon17
I would advise against using Human Phone Book as a closer simply because do you really want 8-9 other people getting the spotlight for your hard work? Mesmer, go back a read Maximum Entertainment, you'll see Weber disagree's with your logic.

Josh London
darrylasher
View Profile
Regular user
179 Posts

Profile of darrylasher
Quote:
On 2007-11-26 16:01, joshlondon17 wrote:
I would advise against using Human Phone Book as a closer simply because do you really want 8-9 other people getting the spotlight for your hard work? Mesmer, go back a read Maximum Entertainment, you'll see Weber disagree's with your logic.

Josh London


I generally agree with the guideline to end with an effect that leaves you alone on the stage. However, ending with a volunteer effect can be done. If the volunteers can be shuttled off smoothly, you can get a round of applause for them. Then, as the applause is dying down, you can thank everyone for their attention and say you enjoyed performing for them and hope they enjoyed it as well. This will kick the applause up (hopefully) and leave a stong impression of lots of applause at the end of the act. The key is in timing it so the first applause does not fully subside.
joshlondon17
View Profile
Special user
San Diego, CA
685 Posts

Profile of joshlondon17
Darrylasher,

I do agree with you, but at the same time the audience may feel slighted that you get applause for the volunteers as they go off stage or you escort them or whatever, then you stand on stage and "keep the applause going" for yourself.

I've seen shows that end like this (mag and other) and it sucks! I felt that I was being taken advantage of if a wierd sort of way. My girlfriend has even felt the same way. She said after one show that it was a wierd ending for some reason.

BUT, if you can get away with it, more power to you!

I would say to end with Human Phone Book, let the volunteers get applause then do a little something. If you watch a comedian their second to last bit is most likely stronger than the last bit.

Josh London
darrylasher
View Profile
Regular user
179 Posts

Profile of darrylasher
Quote:
On 2007-11-26 19:23, joshlondon17 wrote:
Darrylasher,

I do agree with you, but at the same time the audience may feel slighted that you get applause for the volunteers as they go off stage or you escort them or whatever, then you stand on stage and "keep the applause going" for yourself.

I've seen shows that end like this (mag and other) and it sucks! I felt that I was being taken advantage of if a wierd sort of way. My girlfriend has even felt the same way. She said after one show that it was a wierd ending for some reason.

BUT, if you can get away with it, more power to you!

I would say to end with Human Phone Book, let the volunteers get applause then do a little something. If you watch a comedian their second to last bit is most likely stronger than the last bit.

Josh London


That's valid take. I think there is a fine line between "leave them wanting more" and "leave them feeling cheated."

It would probably work best for a performer who knew he had the audience totally on his side during the show. Not for the inexperienced performer, certainly, so in this context it would take a great deal of caution.

In a regular magic show, you can usually get away with it by adding some quick "kicker" like grabbing a flower out of air as you exit or something similar. In a mentalism show, there are really no "quickies" like that. It might be possible to set up the kicker earlier in the show; a selection or drawing is made earlier with the instruction to hold onto it until later. The climax is revealed at the very end. (Just thinking out loud - or rather while typing.)

In any event, yes, it's better to end on stage alone if possible.

Darryl
Experimentalist
View Profile
Veteran user
355 Posts

Profile of Experimentalist
MichielTummers

I noticed the lack of any sort of "cold reading" presentation. No Q and A, no Psychometry. Something like this might add a personal touch to the show.
joshlondon17
View Profile
Special user
San Diego, CA
685 Posts

Profile of joshlondon17
Experimentalist,

I'm not sure if a Q & A Act comes pre-packaged.
Erdnase27
View Profile
Inner circle
2505 Posts

Profile of Erdnase27
Quote:
On 2007-11-26 22:42, Experimentalist wrote:
MichielTummers

I noticed the lack of any sort of "cold reading" presentation. No Q and A, no Psychometry. Something like this might add a personal touch to the show.


eeh there is a question and answer act?(thoughtscan from osterlind)
Erdnase27
View Profile
Inner circle
2505 Posts

Profile of Erdnase27
Quote:
On 2007-11-27 02:34, joshlondon17 wrote:
Experimentalist,

I'm not sure if a Q & A Act comes pre-packaged.


? you really think that I buy everything prepacked?? where did I state that :S most of my stuff doesn't even come from a magicshop and I do read people with every effect. remember an effect is as good or as bad as you make it. but please copy paste Smile
mesmer
View Profile
Inner circle
1186 Posts

Profile of mesmer
Based on my Experience.....if I'm allowed to do Q/A.....I will open my act with it.....but then again....different performer had their own different prespective...that's what make's our art Unique isn' it

in the end....whether a performer is open or close his show with Q&A......in the end.....its how he can entertain his audience is what count the most....

the REAL MAGIC doesn't occur during our performance, it occurs after the show is long over....and after the audience has gone home....Real Magic happens in their conversation over Cereal the next morning or in the office the next afternoon...it's in this moment of recollection that legends are born....and that's My Humble Opinion
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Stage mentalism show (1 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2023 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.07 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL