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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Complex precision miter cuts for bases? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

EsnRedshirt
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Newark, CA
893 Posts

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Just got Osborne's Big Black Book in the mail yesterday. (Nice book- I had a couple of empty spaces in my show, and its given me ideas for some illusions to fill in those holes.)

Now I've only worked with stacked bases, so I figured I'd start incorporating sloped bases into my illusions, and picked a simple illusion to start with. I'm being a good little builder, and making a cardboard mockup for "Bride of the Blades"- and suddenly realizing that according to my calculations, it's going to require some precisely angled compound miter cuts to properly make the sloped base; oh, say about 43.36 degrees on one angle of the cuts. I can fudge it with cardboard, but neither my table saw nor my circular saw go to two significant digits on the angle setting.

Now, short of buying a $7000+ computer-guided laser-precision radial arm saw, how do you guys deal with cuts like these? Do you estimate and overcut to 40-42 degrees, then fill in the gaps with wood putty and angle joints? Do you undercut to 45 degrees and finish the angles with a coping saw? Or is there a simple jig that I don't know about that lets you easily make cuts like this with a circular saw? Thanks in advance for the advice!
Self-proclaimed Jack-of-all-trades and google expert*.

* = Take any advice from this person with a grain of salt.
ChrisG
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Batavia, Ohio
448 Posts

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Sears compound miter with stand. $219.00

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605......raftsman

ChrisG
"Consensus is the negation of Leadership"

M. Thatcher
ClintonMagus
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Southwestern Southeast
3998 Posts

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This might be more information than you were looking for, but here it is anyway:

Miter Cuts
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
EsnRedshirt
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Newark, CA
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Quote:
What most people do is spring the molding up at the requisite angle from the saw table, leave the saw bevel setting at 90°, and just flip the table miter gauge to each 45° setting and chop through.


Actually, amosmc, that's just what I needed. Well, that and a new miter saw. Thanks!
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merlin5150 II
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Aurora, IL
385 Posts

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You could also look into getting the digital angle finder made by Skil, gives you tha angle and also the miter with a push of a button. Jeff
raywitko
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western Pa
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Cut your angles like crown molding. You can purchase a jig for cutting crown molding or you can make one.
Ray
Sometimes it seems there are more than one of me.

Tabman USA
magicdmv
email me at [email]fursclass@magicdmv.com[/email]
raywitko
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western Pa
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Here's a bride of the blades I built a few years back. http://www.tabmantables.com/bladeTastic.jpg or another http://www.tabmantables.com/bladeTastic2.jpg
Ray
Sometimes it seems there are more than one of me.

Tabman USA
magicdmv
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owln_1
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dallas /now live by tulsa
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A compound miter saw and a cheap bevel gauge. Your compound cut should be around the 33 degree mark.F or a starting point cut some scrap and trial-fit it together. Owln_1
Father Photius
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El Paso, TX (Formerly Amarillo)
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You can get a kreg precision miter gauge for your table saw for under $150. There is also a mitre trimmer that is a bit like a paper cutter to finish mitre cuts with, though they cost a bit more than the precision miter gauge.
"Now here's the man with the 25 cent hands, that two bit magician..."
EsnRedshirt
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Newark, CA
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Thanks for all the help. I've got the problem solved. It wasn't that I couldn't determine the angles needed- I just couldn't cut a 43.36 degree angle, and the 10" sliding miter saws at Sears didn't have a big enough depth of cut to safely slice through a 9" piece of plywood elevated 20 degrees. (The 12" sliding miter saws can do this, but they cost $500; maybe for my birthday...)

At any rate, I picked up a 24" hand saw and build a large, adjustable miter box (can go from 6" wide to as wide as needed) out of scrap wood. Total cost- around $25, for a savings of $475.
Self-proclaimed Jack-of-all-trades and google expert*.

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owln_1
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dallas /now live by tulsa
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Sounds good to me, can we split the savings? Owln_1
ClintonMagus
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Southwestern Southeast
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Quote:
On 2008-02-02 00:45, EsnRedshirt wrote:
Thanks for all the help. I've got the problem solved. It wasn't that I couldn't determine the angles needed- I just couldn't cut a 43.36 degree angle, and the 10" sliding miter saws at Sears didn't have a big enough depth of cut to safely slice through a 9" piece of plywood elevated 20 degrees. (The 12" sliding miter saws can do this, but they cost $500; maybe for my birthday...)

At any rate, I picked up a 24" hand saw and build a large, adjustable miter box (can go from 6" wide to as wide as needed) out of scrap wood. Total cost- around $25, for a savings of $475.


A great example of the creativity that magicians showed in the "olden days"...
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
Father Photius
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El Paso, TX (Formerly Amarillo)
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Wood workers have been building jigs for centuries, good to see the practice is being carried on.
"Now here's the man with the 25 cent hands, that two bit magician..."
George Ledo
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SF Bay Area
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Granted I'm a little late on the take here, but I have found so many good ideas for jigs and such in woodworking magazines, it's pitiful. A trip to the local B&N, Borders, Home Depot, Lowe's, or even a large supermarket, will provide lots of mags and ideas for solving those unusual problems. And they're fun to read, too.
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
www.georgefledo.net

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