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Dannydoyle
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I was the first on the bandwagon of not letting it affect you. Please don't leave me out! LOL!
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
jcmagicman
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Clear your heads people. Start thinking PROGRESSION instead of RECESSION.

If you're phones aren't ringing as frequently, 1) get an agent, 2) start advertising and 3) pick up the phone and start making cold calls. Do one or all of the above, but do something other than whine and complain.

Grab a phone book and make 250-300 phone calls a day with a simple intro... "Hi, my name is (insert your name) and I am a magician. I am working on my 2008 show calendar schedule and was wondering if you would be needing some entertainment this year?" Regardless of the outcome, always leave them with your contact information, i.e. phone, website URL.

It's a numbers game, folks, but it works. Do the math. You make 250 calls a day x 5 days x 4 weeks = 5,000 calls. If you sell 1% of these calls, you should easily book 30-50 shows.

Oh yeah, and one more thing, make sure to end every call, and I repeat every single call, with this next question. "Do you know of anyone else who could benefit from my magic entertainment services?" Thank them for their time and attention, and move on to the next call.

So, if you are reading this post, starting tomorrow morning at 9AM. Do this for a month, and then email me on March 16, 2008 to let me know how many solid bookings you received. Now, I usually don't accept tips, but I will gladly accept yours on your way out.

REMEMBER: If you expect to be in business, act like a businessman. Be proactive and get your prize, don't wait for it to come to you.

J.C.
KidMagic
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Bradford
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I don't think that that will be happening any time soon. Libraries have been around for a long time, and it will continue to stay that way...I hope. Smile


Zach
Magically yours,
KidMagic/Zachary Gauthier
www.kidmagic.ca
magicofCurtis
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JC,

Do you really make 250 cold calls a day? There are more effective ways of promoting oneself. First, one would think that targeting your clients that usually need entertainment... i.e. country clubs, Festivals, Fairs, Corporate HR departments, and city events ... Although, some of these might not fit your clientele, but they are vague examples.
Dannydoyle
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The very idea that random cold calls is a great method to sell entertainment services makes you a slave to the phone for the rest of your life.

I don't think this really targets a market, and certainly does not leave you as a lasting impression other than the guy who called them up.

I think there are far more effective ways of utilising ones time. There is a place for cold calls, but a better idea of who you are calling other than just out of the phone book is necessary.


These examples are always fun. You forgot the last rah-rah part, though. If you simply charge $200 per show X 50 shows a month, that is 10 grand a month. Take out expenses, and you are about 80 grand a year for just 4 hours of phone calls a day. And this is at only $200 per show!

Well, sorry, life does not quite work that way. There is a lot more to marketing.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
magicofCurtis
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Danny,
But many magicians usually charge more than $200 a show (I hope so), and I agree there are ways to make a cold call a bit warmer, so to speak.
Chad C.
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I think the point there was to quit complaining about the economy and go and do SOMETHING!
TheGiz
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I still see Starbucks BUSY selling $3.50 lattes. Hard to believe things are that tight. In 1970, I talked to Joe Girard, the world's greatest car salesman, about the recession. I asked him then if he could have been as successful starting in the '70s. He replied, "I'd be more successful. Look at Cuba, Poland, etc. That is a depressed area. Not here. It's just an excuse for the lazy not to work hard..." It's easier to blame the republicans, Bush, the economy, or whatever than it is to knuckle down and work. Victim mentality always needs someone to blame for THEIR problems. "Success is just a matter of luck...ask any loser."

"Thus sayeth TheGiz"
http://blackbeltmagician.com

"And it's a good thing I only use my power for good!!!"
Gerry Walkowski
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Giz:

If you read the Wall Street Journal, you'd discover that Starbucks IS having a difficult time because competitors are popping up and selling coffee at a lower price. So, they're not immune to this whatsoever. Even Tiffany's is having a hard way to go.

Just last week, 2 big catalog companies, Sharper Image and Lillian Vernon, filed for bankruptcy because customers are in fact feeling the financial pinch and are cutting back.

This whole sub-prime thing still hasn't spiked yet. During the next 2-3 years, more of these homes will kick in with balloon payments and, personally, I don't believe our government can get their hands around this 800 pound gorilla.

One credit card company is raising its fees to 24%...and they don't even care if you've never missed a payment. With credit tightening, values of homes decreasing, foreclosures, and energy costing hitting the roof (there's talk of gasoline rising to nearly $4.00 a gallon this Spring), something's got to give.

This is why I feel we're all in for a very rough ride.

Gerry
Chad C.
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You are in for a rough ride if you have credit card debt, bought a house that you cannot afford, and live a life that is above your wage - then, yes, you are in for a rough ride. On the other hand, if one saves their money, only buys what they can afford, has no debt, and doesn't use credit cards and lives in a house that they can afford, then things aren't looking quite so bad.
Steve_Mollett
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Eh, so I've made
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...and never get laid off.
Author of: GARROTE ESCAPES
The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.
- Albert Camus
Dannydoyle
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People buying houses they can't afford, getting foreclosed on, simply means others can afford them.

It only gets bad when people keep letting themselves be told it is bad.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Claymation
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U.S. Unexpectedly Lost 63,000 Jobs in February (Update3)

By Shobhana Chandra

March 7 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. unexpectedly lost jobs in February for the second consecutive month, adding to evidence the economy is in a recession.

Payrolls fell by 63,000, the most in five years, after a revised decline of 22,000 in January, the Labor Department said today in Washington. The jobless rate declined to 4.8 percent, reflecting a shrinking labor force as some people gave up looking for work.

``All the lights are flashing red,'' said Nariman Behravesh, chief economist at Global Insight Inc. in Lexington, Massachusetts, in an interview with Bloomberg Television. ``We're in a recession. I don't think there is any doubt about it at this point.''

Treasury notes soared after the report on concern that the weakening labor market, combined with lower home prices, higher fuel bills and a global credit squeeze will force consumers to further reduce spending. Minutes before the figures were released, the Fed said it will expand two short-term auctions this month to $100 billion to address ``heightened liquidity pressures'' in markets.

Traders now anticipate Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke and his team will cut their benchmark interest rate by at least three quarters of a percentage point at or before their March 18 meeting.

Worse Than Anticipated

Economists had projected payrolls would rise by 23,000 following a previously reported 17,000 drop in January, according to the median of 76 forecasts in a Bloomberg News survey.

The jobless rate was forecast to rise to 5 percent from January's 4.9 percent, with projections ranging from 4.8 percent to 5.2 percent.

Revisions reduced by half the 82,000 increase in payrolls previously reported for December.

Service industries, which include banks, insurance companies, restaurants and retailers, added 26,000 workers last month. Retail payrolls fell by 34,100, the biggest drop in more than five years.

Payrolls at builders fell 39,000, the eighth consecutive month of cutbacks.

Homebuilders are trimming staff as the biggest housing slump in a quarter century deepens. To make matters worse, commercial construction projects are now also on the decline, indicating firings at non-residential builders are likely to increase.

Housing Meltdown

The real estate recession and meltdown in financial markets have led to growing dismissals at banks, mortgage and management companies.

``There's significant weakness in the job market because of construction declines,'' said David Berson, chief economist at Walnut Creek, California-based PMI Group Inc., the second- largest U.S. mortgage insurer. ``For the next six months or so, we may get small negative numbers on payrolls.''

Manufacturing payrolls dropped by 52,000, the biggest decline since July 2003, after falling 31,000 a month earlier. Economists had forecast a drop of 25,000.

Government payrolls increased by 38,000. That means the total decline in private payrolls for the month was 101,000, the biggest drop since March 2003.

Working Week

The average work week was unchanged at 33.7 hours. The average factory work week and overtime hours were unchanged. Average weekly earnings rose $1.68 to $599.86.

Workers' average hourly wages rose 5 cents, or 0.3 percent, to $17.80, in line with forecasts. Hourly earnings were up 3.7 percent from February 2007. Economists surveyed by Bloomberg had forecast a 3.6 percent gain for the 12-month period.

Americans, whose spending accounts for more than two-thirds of the economy, are less upbeat about finding work, a Conference Board report showed last week. The share of consumers who said jobs are plentiful fell and the proportion who said jobs are hard to get jumped, pushing consumer confidence down to a five- year low in February.

``The economic situation has become distinctly less favorable,'' Bernanke said in testimony to Congress last week.

The Fed chairman referred to ``downside'' risks for the economy four times, including ``the possibilities that the housing market or the labor market may deteriorate more than is currently anticipated and that credit conditions may tighten substantially further.''

Investors project the Fed will lower the benchmark interest rate by at least half a point between now and its next meeting on March 18, futures prices show.

Fed Outlook

The central bank's regional economic survey this week said ``the hiring pace slowed in various sectors and labor markets loosened somewhat in many districts,'' as economic growth cooled in eight of 12 regions since the start of 2008.

Adecco SA, the world's biggest temporary-employment company, said this week that fourth-quarter profit declined as hiring slowed in the U.S. The Swiss company also said it may miss its long-term goal of sales growth of 7 percent to 9 percent.

``We've been seeing a weak U.S. market for more than a year now,'' Chief Executive Officer Dieter Scheiff said in a March 4 interview.
Dannydoyle
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So what economic theory says we never have a short term corection?
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Claymation
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None that I've ever heard of. Whether the current turmoil meets the according to Hoyle definition of recession or not is beside the point. Economists are still arguing over the 2000-2001 recession. The fact is people are paying more for gas with dollars that don't go as far as they used to while watching their home values fall. Recession or not, media conspiracy or not, the picture is bleak for the man on the street.
The original question was whether performers should worry about being hired less. Arguing over the definition of recession doesn't change the fact that those who hire entertainment are likely to be thinking about saving money right now.
wally
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Well the phones not ringing much. for the last 16yrs I usually get 5/6 birthday parties everyweek here in uk. this year so far gone down to 2 /3 parties, HELP.
Algebra2
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Somone should make the Federal Reserve and our growing government spending dissapear! I vote for Ron Paul as the political magician to make it happen. You could come up with some routines with silver and gold coins to make a point while showing off a ccol trick explaining what causes "inflation" ie Federal Reserve.
Tom Bartlett
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Our southern border could use
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Quote:
On 2008-03-10 05:10, wally wrote:
Well the phones not ringing much. for the last 16yrs I usually get 5/6 birthday parties everyweek here in uk. this year so far gone down to 2 /3 parties, HELP.


Wally, are implying that the USA is responsible for a recession in the UK?
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Tom Bartlett
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Quote:
On 2008-03-10 19:48, Algebra2 wrote:
Somone should make the Federal Reserve and our growing government spending dissapear! I vote for Ron Paul as the political magician to make it happen. You could come up with some routines with silver and gold coins to make a point while showing off a ccol trick explaining what causes "inflation" ie Federal Reserve.


The smartest thing we could do in the US, would to pass the Fair Tax!
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Chad C.
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The fair tax would be great indeed!
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