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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Knots and loops » » Steve Bedwell's "In Over Your Head" (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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manal
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Ya need big ears for this.
Life is too important to take seriously.

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Whit Haydn
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I think Steve's routine is one of the finest comedy rope routines ever created. I am a huge fan of his, and of this very clever and commercial routine.
Floyd Collins
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Pop yours is right up there with Steve's.
No one said it would be easy, or did they?

Check out my all new book "Chicken Scratches" visit my lulu store for more information.

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defconskylude
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So has anyone been able to perform this in a non stage performance using a swiss pocket knife?

Also what about performing this using a shoe lace?

I'd like to incorporate this routine along with my ring and string.
Whit Haydn
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It would not play well with a shoe lace.
Jay Buchanan
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Quote:
On 2009-08-22 08:18, aceofharts wrote:
Pop yours is right up there with Steve's.


I agree 100%
Two of my favorite routines to perform!
Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt. ~ Shakespeare
parmenion
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Quote:
On 2009-08-24 19:12, defconskylude wrote:
So has anyone been able to perform this in a non stage performance using a swiss pocket knife?

Also what about performing this using a shoe lace?

I'd like to incorporate this routine along with my ring and string.


Are you kidding ?
I hope so,if not it's totally stupid
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Mac_Stone
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Quote:
On 2009-08-25 11:32, Jay Buchanan wrote:
Quote:
On 2009-08-22 08:18, aceofharts wrote:
Pop yours is right up there with Steve's.


I agree 100%
Two of my favorite routines to perform!


I think the two could play well together. After you pull one over on your spectator you can pull on over on yourself.
Corbett
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Where is this routine available?
Doug Arden
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Quote:
On 2009-09-03 10:22, Corbett wrote:
Where is this routine available?


http://www.magicproshop.com/over-your-he......194.html
Corbett
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Thanks much.
Michel Fouche
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In the manuscript Steve uses a female volunteer. Is anyone out there doing it regularly with a male volunteer? Is there much difference in compliance?
Sealegs
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Michel,

Obviously the dynamic for any effect will be different between two guys, and a guy and a girl, or a girl and a girl. But there's no reason in practice why all the elements of the routine shouldn't play equally as well.

No parts of the structure routine are reliant in any way on the sex of the participants.

Cheers Neal
Neal Austin

"The golden rule is that there are no golden rules." G.B. Shaw
Michel Fouche
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Hey look, I'm bringing this thread back AGAIN.

For those who perform this regularly, how to you avoid looking or feeling stiff to the volunteer? Obviously (without giving anything away) there are limitations on your movement and I find this makes me interact with the volunteer in a slightly less than natural manner. Less eye contact for instance.
Jay Buchanan
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Quote:
On 2012-06-07 23:59, Michel Fouche wrote:
Hey look, I'm bringing this thread back AGAIN.

For those who perform this regularly, how to you avoid looking or feeling stiff to the volunteer? Obviously (without giving anything away) there are limitations on your movement and I find this makes me interact with the volunteer in a slightly less than natural manner. Less eye contact for instance.


I find that they are usually so worried about how THEY look and act, that how I look and act flies right past them. The applause cue bit puts the focus on them, and they know that they become the star every time they do it, and that usually trumps any other thought they might have while up there with you. Another thing you could do (I've done this and it works) is to do a quick little interview with the spectator once they arrive on stage and you position them. A few questions amongst friends in a very casual way, only do it exactly as if you had the **** in your *** already, only you don't yet.

I usually have them stand in position for the routine, I ask them if they're nervous and however they answer I stand right next to them (also in position for the routine) and I look straight forward into the audience as I lean left and slowly tell the spectator "I just picture them all their underwear, it get's me through the show!" As I say this I smile awkwardly at the audience, I glance to the left as if I am "loaded" for the routine and I say, "you're doing it right now aren't you? Picturing them in their underwear?" This always gets a laugh and as I say it I am glancing back and forth from the audience to the spectator. And then I will usually do a loud stage whisper (so everyone can hear me) as I glance to the spectator, something like... "Don't worry, this is going to be comepletly amazing... for you... not for them, they'll all see how this is done, but for you, it's going to be mind boggling!" At which point I go right into explaining that little tidbit, per the manuscript. The whole time I am saying this stuff, I am leaning a bit left and glancing between them and the audience with a side-eye glance. By the time I actually HAVE to do that stance/glance, it's just par for the course.

This routine remains one of my favorites. I am strongly considering heading out someday soon and trying my hand at some busking because I truly LOVE the atmosphere of the streets, and if I do.. "In over your head" will very likely be a feature of my act. I know this will be a bit riskier than on a platform or stage, as I'll likely be sorrounded quite a bit, but I have already done this surrounded several times and it didn't seem to hurt the strength.

Such an amazingly well thought out routine, in my opinion. Kudos again to Doctor Bedwell for sharing this incredible work of art.
Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt. ~ Shakespeare
Michel Fouche
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Thanks heaps. I guess I notice the difference more than the volunteer ever would. I love the underwear bit, too.
Sealegs
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Michel, you have pointed up a presentational aspect of this routine that definitely needs to be considered and worked into one's blocking of the effect. The way the routine is constructed kind of dictates how you stand and address the spectator so there really is no issue other then those invented/percieved by the performer. However it is perfectly reasonable to see that the performer new to this routine might feel that their interactions with the assisting spectator are not as natural as they might be but for the limitations put on the performer by the workings of the routine. However these limitations are noticed by the performer only.... the routine is so constructed that the assisting spectator, during these moments of more limited eye contact is largely following the performer's instructions and actions.

Jay's general suggestions provide an excellent way to approach how to lessen one's feeling of potential discomfort in how one interacts with the spectator on stage during the 'set up' moments.. I say, 'potential' because in reality the assisting spectator is, as Jay suggested, generally oblivious to the concerns a performer new to this routine might feel. But, addressing the assisting spectator early in the routine in the same manner that you'll being address them in the middle of the routine can certainly help set, in the assisting spectators mind, the look of your interactions with them and as a result this can make the performer feel more comfortable.

In essence what I'm suggesting Michel is that your concerns are understandable and make sense... but within the routine these are concern's that are not an operational or methodological issue. However feeling comfortable with a method is important and to that end the advice Jay offers, in general terms, can help put a performer's mind in a more comfortable place.

Do the routine a few times and you'll find there really is no issue with the spectator on stage.

In fact the main blocking to address, in my opinion, is not the spectator on stage but it's is letting the audience on the far side spectator's side of the stage get clear view and understanding of what is going on. This can be achieved by moving slightly downstage of the assisting spectator and then turning slightly to address that section of the crowd. It really is a question of just a pace or half a pace downstage of the assisting spectator.

These are the kinds of things that, if you have any sense of stage awareness, will happen more or less automatically. However it's always a good idea to think through these aspects of a performance before hand. The patter, blocking, staging, choreography etc of a routine is as important as the actual handling and method. Equal consideration needs to be given to each of these elements for the whole to become more than the sum of the individual parts. This is true of any routine not just Steve's 'In Over Your Head'.

So, at the risk of sounding terribly patronising... well done for asking the question. Such questions about the details of a performance are important and are unfortunately often overlooked.
Neal Austin

"The golden rule is that there are no golden rules." G.B. Shaw
Damian
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Any tips on where I can find this manuscript? Seems to be out of stock everywhere I look.
Thanks,
Damian
Michel Fouche
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