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mjeayres
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Hi Everyone,

I could do with your help and ideas. I have been asked to do a radio spot for local radio and they have asked me to do some magic, I have been racking my brains as to what could work on radio. The presenters have said that they would describe what was happening... but I am still at a loss. I did think of doing a simple card trick and have the card on my website so the listeners can go to my website.. but again I am still not sure what would work. They say the show is about children's entertainment, so should I do a kids effect? If so what would work without having a group of kids in front of you!!?

Have any of you done magic on radio? You help and advice would be gratefully received!

Many Thanks

Marcus
Tom Riddle
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Try Tyler's Silken Saga, if you can lay hands on the manuscript. I believe it was originally devised as a wireless effect on the BBC home service.
"Yes, Virginia, there really are people named Riddle...isn't that AMAZING! And to think of all the royalties I'm missing out on! SCANDALOUS!"

Thomas Williamson Riddle III
Chelsea, UK
Tony James
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Hardly Tom. Don't you mean Tylers Chinese Sago. It was a play on words thing. ideal for radio.
Tony James

Still A Child At Heart
Spellbinder
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I always called it Tyler's Chinese Saga. Did you misspell it, or am I mistaken? Anyway, it's a great story!
Professor Spellbinder

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yfoog
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You could do a mental magic, like the pick a number thing where at the end everyone has the same number.

If an announcer is going to be narration what is happening, you could d Bandana/Banana. Set it up ahead of time with the DJ, have him read the Bandana script, while you proceed with the banana. He could then explain to the listeners that you misheard him and are using a banana, and describe the mushy mess.
The Magic of Jim Percy
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Tom Riddle
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Woops.............my mistake. It was the Tyler's Chinese Sago Pudding that I was referring to. The "silken" is naturally only for the drawing room or theatre(except magic conventions, ofcourse).
"Yes, Virginia, there really are people named Riddle...isn't that AMAZING! And to think of all the royalties I'm missing out on! SCANDALOUS!"

Thomas Williamson Riddle III
Chelsea, UK
Tony James
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Sago Spellbinder. Sago. I don't know if you have it in America. It's not rice but a pudding grain beloved of school meals when in England at least, it is refereed to as Frog-spawn.

No one is permitted to like it and if anyone dares to suggest it is other than UGHHHHHHHH! they are condemned to be bumped Greyfriars Fashion on the Dumpy Pitch below the Lower Third Remove.

A humiliating experience complete with lavatory brush and mop.

Oh the delights of the English Boarding School life.
Tony James

Still A Child At Heart
Tom Riddle
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Tony, please remind me. Is Sago the same as Tapioca and Rice pudding, or are there subtle differences? I know it tastes delicious with a blob of jam in the middle. My concern with Marcus trying this on the radio is that Sago may not be in every housewife's cupboard these days. However, I see that Marcus lives in the UK, so he is definitely at an advantage here. He might want to give David Berglas a ring, as something makes me think he did this on the radio back in the early 60's.......but I could be wrong. However, David has always been a little more protective of his secrets than his son Marvin, so he may not wish to reveal too much. It is definitely worth a try.
"Yes, Virginia, there really are people named Riddle...isn't that AMAZING! And to think of all the royalties I'm missing out on! SCANDALOUS!"

Thomas Williamson Riddle III
Chelsea, UK
Tony James
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We are talking puddings now, Tom dear boy. Nursery puddings by some, ever popular with Nanny who considered them essential to build up growing infants. Also, of course a favourite (or not, according to palate) in the sick room where they were considered nutritious and easily digested.

The fact that they were all cheap as well as filling made them a favourite at school meals. they are in fact all different if possibly similar.

There are certain London eating houses which specialise in these - to some - gastronomic delights from a happier age. But Tom will know all about them. They don't tend to advertise so as to maintain a like-minded clientèle. Doubtless an after dinner delight will be flagellation in an upstairs garret. Don't probe dear friends. It's better not to know. Does Mrs Riddle know, Tom?

Rice is rice grains, short rice grains as distinct from long rice such as Basmati (one of the Queens of rice from the Himalayas and organic brown Basmati is brilliant) or medium grain rice, both of which are for savoury dishes. Short grain is for sweet puddings.

I always put the rice in a pan with the milk and a thin strip of lemon rind with the pith removed - no pith in the pudding or the milk will separate - bring it to the boil, take it off the heat, add the sugar and stir to dissolve and pour the mix into a lavishly buttered dish, add dabs of butter to the surface, grind plenty of nutmeg over the surface and bake in a slow oven.

The result is quite sublime.

Now Ground Rice is interesting. It's ground to a coarse flour (Rice Flour however is too fine and unsuitable) and cooked in a pan with milk and sugar and forms a thick paste which can be eaten hot with some flavouring -fruit or jam - or poured into moulds and turned out when cold to form rice moulds to form part of a cold pudding.

And what follows is all a variation on these two basics.

Sago is derived from the inner heartwood of the Sago Palm, beaten to release starch which is cleaned and refined. It can be a flour and cooked just like the ground rice or obtained as sago pearls, little tiny blobs and when cooked with milk looks exactly like frog-spawn!

Needs flavouring as it doesn't have a lot of flavour of its own.

Tapioca is a similar product to sago but derived as a starch flour from treating the root of the cassava plant. The plant I think is deadly poisonous and used for obtaining poison for arrow tips but the root is edible.

Again, it can be cooked as a flour making a thick paste or also obtained as Tapioca Pearls and is difficult to distinguish from Sago. However, as the aficionado will instantly recognise, whereas Sago Pearls have little flavour, Tapioca Pearls has none whatsoever!

And finally Semolina. This is wheat (usually hard durum wheat considered the best for pasta) and that part which remains after the finest milled particles have been removed for pasta making and other uses. It's a rather coarse product.

If instead of wheat you use maize then this left over part is known as Grits.

Once more it is a mix of milk and sugar and the result is a paste pudding.

Of course, if you make any of these 'paste puddings' you have only to cook them as they did and still do at school with more liquid, and you have more of a loose and runny pudding. At school, the trick to keep the cost down was to add a lot of water! Milk is better but milk is expensive and in short supply in England when we went to school, eh Tom?

Like all good cuisine it's not so much the basic and perhaps of itself not terribly exciting dish that matters but what you then do with it.

We all know what we wanted to do with it at school especially in the post war years when sugar and jam were rationed to about two ounces per person per week and one egg every two weeks and how much bread? It wasn't much. We were all starving yet we're told at our healthiest as a nation. We had enough to eat and no more.

Still we had the radio, The Piddingtons who amazed us - on radio - with their second sight act and it seemed to keep us warm as the electricity went off every afternoon because of power cuts which went on for years.

Never mind, we won the war, even if it seemed questionable at the time.
Tony James

Still A Child At Heart
James Munton
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Tony,

A most wonderful explanation, but I would like to add that the Japanese cook almost exclusively with short grain rice for both savory and sweet dishes.

I must confess I am not familiar with sago. I had the misfortune of eating plenty of semolina in my youth, but never sago. Could it be something that was eliminated from the British Isles during decimalization?

Best,
James
Tom Riddle
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A brilliant contribution, Tony. Getting back to the topic in hand, I am wondering if Mrs. Wilfred Tyler was really the inspiration behind Tyler's Chinese Sago? She could well have put Sago out on the dinner table on a regular basis, and one night, over a pink Gin, the creative master came up with the masterpiece. I am only guessing, but it seems quite likely in my judgement.
"Yes, Virginia, there really are people named Riddle...isn't that AMAZING! And to think of all the royalties I'm missing out on! SCANDALOUS!"

Thomas Williamson Riddle III
Chelsea, UK
Slim King
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