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Michael Baker
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Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
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Does anyone here know how to paint on glass, specifically the inside of a glass bottle, and more specifically, what type/brand of paint should be used? Hopefully, I will hear from someone who has actually done it. All my resonable guesses have been wrong. Smile

Thanks!

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
The Drake
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Inner circle
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My only guess would be to use some of the stain that is used for stained glass artwork.

Best,

Tim

Day 7
gsidhe
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Michigan
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I both paint and chemical etch on glass- I have work in several stores and art galleries (And on ye olde myspace http://www.myspace.com/knottythings if you have an account, check out the photos page ). What exactly are you looking to do?
Do you want opaque paint or transluscent?
Painting the inside of a bottle can be very difficult, but not impossible.
I find etching to be much easier.
For a stained glass look, check out this stuff- Available at Michaels and at Hobby Lobby. We used it for our backlit glass show signs. It applies really easily, but doing the leading lines is a must, otherwise it spreads out. It does not act like normal paint would.
If you are just trying to make a bottle less transparent, a simple etch might be easier. If you want to PM me I can go into more deatil (And my glass skills are for hire if you need them!)
I'll help any way I can.
Gwyd
Michael Baker
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The idea is (or should be) relatively basic. I want to paint the inside of a glass bottle so that it becomes opaque. I found a bottle that I would like to use for a Chinese Prayer Vase (bottle and rope).

I figured if Adams could do it for decades, with the paint lasting many years in some cases, then I should be able to paint one, too. I just have not found the right kind of paint to use (so far).

~michael

Day 7
~michael baker
The Magic Company
hugmagic
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The paint probably had lead in it. Have you tried an epoxy paint?
richard
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
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gsidhe
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I made one the exact same way. Here's how I did it.
I filled the bottle with glass etching acid- The liquid, not the paste type.
Let it sit for about a half hour and emptied out the acid (Which is reusable btw...)
Then poured acryllic paint into the bottle. The etch gave the glass texture so the acryllic paint could grab hold. Swished the bottle around so that the paint covered the bottle fully on the inside and dumped the paint out.
Never had any adhesion issues at all.
Hope this helps.
Gwyd
Michael Baker
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Richard,

I'd have no doubt Adams' origianl paint had lead in it. The latest version of the glass bottle I have came from the late 60's. I have not tried epoxy, because I could not find the color I wanted.

Gwyd,

I think your idea may be the ticket.

A few questions...

1) Would/should the average DIY hobby store (Michael's, Hobby Lobby) have the etch acid, or would I need to look elsewhere?

2) Do you wash out the bottle after etching, prior to painting?

3) Do you use the use the acrylic paint in bottles, like tole painters use, or the tube/paste stuff and thin it? Would it matter.

4) Now that I am thinking about it (which is how I usually end up in trouble Smile ), once the glass was etched, wouldn't other types of paint (lacquer, enamel, etc.) now stick, as well?

Thanks for everyone's time on this! Much appreciated!!

~michael

Day 8
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Steve Anderson
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Texas
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Michael,
Yes...You will find the glass etching acid at Michaels or Hobby Lobby sometimes even in the craft dept of wal-mart too. I am almost sure other types of paints would work once the etching has been done.
Let us know how it turns out.
Good luck
Steve
Regan
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Just to comfirm Steve's post, I saw an etching kit at Michael's recently. So Michael, go to Michael's, get to work, and don't forget to let us know how this turns out.

Good luck!

:)

Regan
Mister Mystery
rhiro
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Quote:
On 2008-03-08 10:17, Michael Baker wrote:
I have not tried epoxy, because I could not find the color I wanted.


What color are you aiming for, Michael? Perhaps you could use a casting compound or laminating epoxy with a pigment mixed in. Lots of different epoxy pigments are available in liquid dyes and dry powder. Check out http://www.cstsales.com and search on "pigment" to see some examples.

I once needed to get a tinted, opaque look in epoxy and mixed in baby powder in conjunction with dry pigment. It looked and worked great.

For your application, I would consider thinning the mixture a bit with a solvent (I like using ultra pure isopropenol) to get nice flow. You'd have to baby sit the bottle and keep it rotating until the epoxy starts to gel. It would be a lot like rotational molding. I suspect it might help to warm the bottle prior to applying the epoxy to get it to flow nicer and kick off faster. (But not too hot or it might kickoff too fast and exotherm.)

Ross
Michael Baker
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I was wanting a bright Chinese red; going for the tradidional colors of the trick. The only epoxy paints I was able to find locally assumed everyone wants to paint a refrigerator (black or white).

All excellent suggestions! Thanks guys! First thing I will try is a trip to Michael's. There is one close by.

I'll let everyone know in a few days, how it turns out.

First thing is to wash out the crappy paint out of the bottle with acetone. (I'm getting good at that!)

Ross,

If the quicker fix doesn't work, I'll get with you for more clarity on the epoxies. Thanks!

~michael

Day 8
~michael baker
The Magic Company
magicwatcher2005
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You can buy acrilic paint that has glass powder in it and then bake the bottle in a kiln so it fuses. They do that with coffee cups all the time.
hugmagic
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I believe that an automotive paint supply could custom mix an epoxy color for you.

Richard
Richard E. Hughes, Hughes Magic Inc., 352 N. Prospect St., Ravenna, OH 44266 (330)296-4023
www.hughesmagic.com
email-hugmagic@raex.com
Write direct as I will be turning off my PM's.
Michael Baker
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I read about the kiln-fused paints online, but I don't have access to a kiln, at least not at this juncture.

Richard, I will check into the automotive paints in the event the acid method does not produce the results I want.

Thanks again to everyone!

~michael

Day 8
~michael baker
The Magic Company
George Ledo
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I know you specifically asked for people who had done this... Smile

However, my guess is that if the Adams Company did this for decades, and considering their prices, they may have just used an oil-based paint, maybe two coats, and left it at that.
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
www.georgefledo.net

Latest column: "Sorry about the photos in my posts here"
Michael Baker
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I would have thought as much, too. But for some reason, all the paints I've tried have just ended up sliding off the sides, and end up pooled in the bottom, leaving streaks on the inside of the bottle.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
gsidhe
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Sorry I didn't get back right away.
Yes...Most craft places sell the etch.
Just make sure you get the liquid, not the paste etch. You definately need to rinse the bottle afterwards.
I use the acryllic in the bottles.
Any paint should work after the etch gives it a surface that it can hold on, but I am sure of the acryllic.
Let me know how it turns out!
Gwyd
docguitarman
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Thousand Oaks, California
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Any update, hints and other sage advice on this topic?

Here's my situation:

I need a prop that requires me to paint the inside of a glass. This effect ("Back to the Farm") is found in the booklet "They're Off" by Frank Lane and U.F.Grant. The instructions just say "paint it on the INSIDE with red paint ... and let it dry" ! That sounds easy! My plan was just to clean the beer glass with alcohol, let dry, tape off the brim of the glass on the inside and spray interior with tomato red (or maybe some other color for other drinks) Krylon.

I got the glass cheap at Goodwill... but it took me a long time hunting to get the exact (actually perfect!) size glass I needed... so I don't want to botch it! Actually finding the right color of paint to match various beverages may also be an issue.
Michael Baker
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That was over ten years ago. I abandoned the project in favor of things that made more sense for me.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
DelMagic
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Here is an idea that just popped into my head regarding the etching of the inside of a glass and avoiding the acid. I figure there are some people who do not want the headache of handling acid and some less careful types who probably shouldn't do it. I worked in a chemical laboratory as a technician for 34 years and have handled my fair share of acids. However, our machine shop had a sandblasting box that they used to clean fittings, parts and other items when needed. There was hose with a nozzle in it that the sand shot out of - something akin to airbrushing. I know that artisans have produced images on glass by etching using sandblasting. I was thinking that perhaps you might be able to get enough of an etch on the inside of a glass with a good sized mouth. This might be less useful for bottles depending upon their shape. While I doubt any magicians have such box in their house, you might be able to find a local machine shop that has one.
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