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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Are cards worth it? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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xslider
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Quote:
On 2003-03-27 20:10, TheNightBringer89 wrote:
Does anyone else here think that coins are way harder than cards? Maybe its just me, but when I coin trick for lay people they seem to know about fake transfers. Maybe its becaus usually my lay people are computer geniuos' hehe.


Well, it's not that they are computer geniuses, but the fact that almost everyone, at one time or another in their life, are interested in magic. They will march down to the library, pick up some beginning books and read about cards, coins, bills, whatever it may be and have a basic understanding of it.

To confuse them, just do a "fake" fake transfer, and see what happens.

After reading through all of this, I see people either side toward cards or side toward coins. Why not incorporate both? A coin appears bottom of a card, or a card suddenly appears under a large coin? Manipulation work to change coins into cards, and vice versa.
MariusHaugan
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Quote:
On 2003-03-27 20:27, Saqib16 wrote:
Anybody can do a card trick, but with coins it's all skill.



Are you kidding me? I'm speachless! I'm out of speach!
"There is no branch of conjuring that so fully repays the amateur for his labor and study as sleight-of-hand with cards."
S.W Erdnase
Pete Biro
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Hey, if you don't like cards Smile right now... fine... concentrate on coins Smile and be the best coin man of all time.

Then, one day you may get tired of coins and only want to do tricks with paper money.

It really doesn't matter.

Just get passionate and get on with it. Smile
Just don't take up escapes...now that's boring Smile
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Otis Day
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-I am brand new at card magic. I can do some jogging and passes and glide and few other sleights and some flourishes decently well. Good enough to fool anyway

Sorry, this may come off rude....but if you're brand new to card magic, maybe you shouldn't be working on the pass and concentrate on some other thinigs, like basics and presentation. I watche your videos, and for being new to card magic, they are coming along. But those passes shouldn't be performed for people for a long time. They are not ready for prime time baby. It's frustrating that because of Brad C newbies to magic thingk the first thing they should learn is the pass...but then they can't even do a good double(not saying it's you...just noticed a lot of clips like that). That "one handed pass" is not a one handed pass. It's missing justification for putting the deck on top of the card in the center then putting the deck back together differently.
Hideo Kato
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If Seismic was my son, I would tell him two different advices.

1.Don't descend a mountain before arriving the peak. If you quit it now, you will quit other things also on the way.

2.Try anything you are interested. Have interest in many things in youth.

As Seismic is not my son, I will say "Enjoy it".

Hideo Kato

P.S.
I have much experience of escaping from the things I once had been excited. I escaped from Golf. I escaped from buying expensive wine. I escaped from Backgammon. I recently escaped from Bowling. But in my case, I always escaped after reaching a considerable level. I won a major tournament in Backgammon. I had stock of 300 bottles of wine. My average score was 200 and played 300 4 times in Bowling tournaments. I escaped from other magic than card magic.

But in the last case of card magic, the reason was different. I escaped from other magic because I noticed Card Magic has profundity and it is worth to devote rest of my life.

If you were my son, let me tell you "Love it if you will do it".
JoeHohman
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I really should not read these posts at lunch: they are fascinating, and I should get back to work...

Garrett and Hideo: I would like to sit down and talk to you guys over a pitcher of beer someday (or a bottle of wine, if you prefer, Hideo).

Here's my two cents (and they're probably better-stated elsewhere): take a break from whatever is haunting you.

Just about everyone can probably relate to what Seismic is going through. There is so much to learn that it is overwhelming; there are ENTIRE BOOKS AND VIDEOS devoted to individual sleights, for crying out loud. Yikes!

I had the opportunity to talk with Michael Ammar last year when he performed where I work, and he said something unusual: "If you want to get really good at magic, you have to develop an obsession with it that your family may think is unhealthy." At the time, I really didn't "get" what he meant, but I think I do now, and now I would amend it to say "... that your family or EVEN YOU may think is unhealthy."

Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love these posts and the entire Magic Café, but sometimes I think that magicians get too het up (you can use het in Boggle now, Garrett) about variations in moves and in learning techniques that will fool other magicians, and they don't worry enough about developing a sense of style and showmanship that LAYMEN find engaging and entertaining. I don't think I am ever going to develop something that will fool other magicians; but I hope that I can ALWAYS fool, entertain, and even charm an audience, whether that is a small group in a restaurant or just my friends at work.

What I'm getting at, Seismic, is this -- there is too much technical stuff to master. You can't be an expert at all of it, though you may be tempted. Learn some truly entertaining card tricks that are NOT pick a card types (spectators love it when THEY get to handle the cards and do the trick). Then buy Bobo or David Regal and knock yourself out. Then learn a decent Matrix routine (a steak pizza is sounding pretty good right now).

But in between those events, observe some good stand-up comedians. Learn how to juggle. Go bowling. Learn how to cook a good chili, or pork-fried rice.

Just don't burn out!

My favorite band was the Beatles. Thirty three years later, everyone still speculates on why they broke up: was it John's boredom, was Paul too dictatorial, was George feeling stifled, was Ringo feeling unappreciated, was it too much money, was it Yoko? Yeah, yeah, yeah, it was all those things, but do you know what it really was? They worked themselves to death, and they never took a break from each other! (If you don't believe me, read "The Beatles Recording Sessions," which documents their studio log with dates and times -- their longest break away from each other from 1962 to 1970 was only about 3 months.)

So take a break from cards, learn some coins, learn some other non-magic stuff, but DON'T BURN OUT!
Hideo Kato
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Joe, maybe you discovered the focus of a disaster. Too much information after Internet got popular.

I never recommend Encyclopedia Of Card Sleights to my students as it is possible to give similar frustration Seismic got.

Maybe peaceful way of enjoying magic is not to get too much information, but enjoying each magic thoroughly.

Hideo Kato
Pete Biro
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One step (forward only) at a time.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
cardguy
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Quote:
On 2003-09-22 11:15, MariusHaugan wrote:
Quote:
On 2003-03-27 20:27, Saqib16 wrote:
Anybody can do a card trick, but with coins it's all skill.



Are you kidding me? I'm speachless! I'm out of speach!


Well I got some words for Sabiq16. How about he show us a good card trick? No, not the one with 21 cards...
Frank G. a.k.a. Cardguy
Alewishus
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Sometimes I look at a deck of cards and I think to myself 'why have I wasted sooo much time with these?' and yet I know I won't even go for a walk without a deck somewhere on my person. Don't get burned out, and keep them near. Who said that you can find infinity in a grain of sand? Cards are like that to me, just not all the time.
C.S.M.
Sack subs, ok Ross?
We miss you asper.
GaryW
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Do what makes you happy. I personally like to work with both but probably have a tendency to favor coins.

My concern with card is working with children. They seem to have problems or maybe a lack of interest in card effects that go too deep. I've never had the kids loose interest in the coin effects that I do. JMO.
Gary Ailes
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TheAmbitiousCard
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I don't necessarily agree with "If it seem like too much work, find a different hobby".

Some effects are a TON of work and you have to bite the bullet and go for it.

2 effects come to mind..

1. Cylinder and Coins. It was probably 12-18 months work before I felt comfortable performing that trick in front of anyone and I practiced it ALL THE TIME. That was a lot of work but I was determined.

2. Purse And Glass. Right now this seems like too much work. I got burned out from #1 up there and now I cannot even start to work on this one. I love this effect but I'm going to wait to get my energy back to where I'm willing to tackle it again.

Until then, I'm learning other smaller routines which is not a bad idea. The things I learn now will transfer over to other effects later.

Here's my opinion in what appears to be a rather large nutshell:
The idea of bouncing around, learning effects that tickle your fancy at the time, regardless of type (card,coin,pins,rope), is very much the way to go. It keeps you fresh, avoids burn-out, keeps you thinking, and keeps you loving magic. To just be a coin guy or just be a card guy is limiting your repitoire for no reason.

Soon after I started learning magic, I wanted to perform. So I asked myself, what if I was asked to do a stand-up show? What would I do? Card tricks? My 2 coin tricks? I realized that I needed to be versatile and learned a great many different kinds of magic that could be done close-up, stand-up, etc.


Unitl recently, I still thought coins were too much work and then one particular effect brought me back (Doug Brewer's Famous 3 Coin Trick). Now I'm back BABY!!!!!


If cards seem like too much work, instead of practicing slights, find an effect (e.g. ,recommendation from a friend) that you love, that has something new (and attainable) to learn, that you can't wait to perform, and go from there.

Take baby steps. One trick at a time.
www.theambitiouscard.com Hand Crafted Magic
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Dave Shepherd
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Bottom line: it's not really about the tricks, not about the props (per se), but rather it's about what you get excited about.

I too have gone through times, when I was much younger, when I thought cards were a weird thing to take out and do magic with. Then I got deeper and deeper into really excellent card magic and discovered the profundity to which Hideo Kato refers.

If cards feel like too much work, then at the present moment they might be too much work (for you). I find great coin magic to be excruciatingly hard work, and I perform only about three or four coin routines in my current professional repertoire. Doesn't mean I don't like coin magic, but it feels like "too much work," which means that my audience is going to perceive a lot of sweating and grunting going on. I don't want that!
Neil
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I know what Seismic means about some card tricks. I find many of them to be less than entertaining. Some of them are very puzzling and "amazing" to a degree but often don't produce a big WOW!

I find myself gravitating towards the sort of card effects that I like to see - cards appearing under glasses, in wallets, in your mouth or cards changing suddenly and other dramatic effects. Now I like performing cards cos I'm doing what I like. I don't like locations or counting effects or producing poker hands or one's which are merely puzzling.

Maybe you need to just pick YOUR personal gems and eschew the chaff that's out there.
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