The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The little darlings » » The Very Evil Children. (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2
Hansel
View Profile
Inner circle
Puerto Rico
2492 Posts

Profile of Hansel
Quote:
On 2008-07-17 21:47, T. Sebastian wrote:
I would not want my child ridiculed.
But, I have taught my children good manners and how to behave. (through example and constant nagging)
So, I would hope that neither of them would ever engage in the types of behaviour that would provoke the wrath of a warrior wizard.
You're right though, Captain.
I shouldn't do that.
I'd also like to comment on the resolution of the misunderstanding concerning the evilness of a child with respect to his/her parents.
That, ladies and gentlemen is how adults behave.
I will endeavor to follow your example.
And to remember my own parenting principles when I am working.



that's exactly was I mean...DONT RIDICULED,But if he wants attention...make the way to that!!! If he is screaming and making your show a mess...HE WANTS ATTENTION...So lets bring a little help. Sincerely I do that in every "Evil kids situation" and never the kid go off offensed...maybe happy because you bring attention to him. that's is more about the treat and management of little audience members that you have...
Thanks,
Hansel!
Follow Me...
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Hansels-Comedy-and-Magic-Show-929625643774678/
Youtube: HanselSP
Twitter: @HanselSP
Instagram: HanselSP
Ed_Millis
View Profile
Inner circle
Yuma, AZ
2291 Posts

Profile of Ed_Millis
So if he is acting bad and wants attention and you give it to him, you have just rewarded his obnoxious behavior. What do you thnk he's going to do when the show moves on and he is no longer the center of attention? Or the next time he sees you performing and he wants attention?

I live in an area with many people from another culture. As far as I can tell, their children can do no wrong, and they are protected at every turn from anyone attempting to discipline them. Any punishment is met with cries of prejudice and racism. The most severe punishment they dish out is "Darling - no - stop that." Let me physically lay a hand on such a child to separate one of my props from him and I can be jailed or worse!

I personally think there is a time to simply tell the whole audience "I'm sorry, but I can not continue because this person is totally disrupting my performance. I apologize for having to stop my show, but I'm not legally allowed to stop him."

And then you pack up and leave. If the audience cares about your performance, they will stop the misbehaving one and request that you stay and finish. If they don't care that much, then why stay there and perform? I would never have let any of my four kids be that disruptive and disrespectful, nor make any performer suffer through their bad behavior. Why would I want to present myself to people who lack the basic element of respect to abuse me like that?

You have no control over any part of the situation except whether you stay and perform. Leaving is your only weapon - use it if you must. And make sure that if this is a contracted gig that there is a clause in the contract allowing you to decide if performance conditions are too demanding and if so leave with full payment.

Again, I do not perform on the streets. And I no longer do birthday parties here for this same reason. So it may be that I am just hiding from own lack of ability to control an audience. Please factor that into my reply.

Ed
KC Cameron
View Profile
Inner circle
Raleigh, North Carolina
1877 Posts

Profile of KC Cameron
I think the goal of the magician in this situation is generally short term, "How do I get through this show!" and not worry about the future. But the future is important, not with just that kid, but how your audience perceives you. Your audience is full of potential gigs. Personally, I think prevention is much easier and professional than a cure. It has been very successful for me.


Everyone's situation is different, so what one has to deal with can be different from another - even in the same area. Walking out of a show can appear unprofessional, and that would have to be weighed against staying. I would ask parents from that culture what to do to keep control of the kids - maybe you may get some useful information.
Hansel
View Profile
Inner circle
Puerto Rico
2492 Posts

Profile of Hansel
Quote:
On 2008-07-18 13:32, Ed_Millis wrote:
So if he is acting bad and wants attention and you give it to him, you have just rewarded his obnoxious behavior. What do you thnk he's going to do when the show moves on and he is no longer the center of attention? Or the next time he sees you performing and he wants attention?

I live in an area with many people from another culture. As far as I can tell, their children can do no wrong, and they are protected at every turn from anyone attempting to discipline them. Any punishment is met with cries of prejudice and racism. The most severe punishment they dish out is "Darling - no - stop that." Let me physically lay a hand on such a child to separate one of my props from him and I can be jailed or worse!

I personally think there is a time to simply tell the whole audience "I'm sorry, but I can not continue because this person is totally disrupting my performance. I apologize for having to stop my show, but I'm not legally allowed to stop him."

And then you pack up and leave. If the audience cares about your performance, they will stop the misbehaving one and request that you stay and finish. If they don't care that much, then why stay there and perform? I would never have let any of my four kids be that disruptive and disrespectful, nor make any performer suffer through their bad behavior. Why would I want to present myself to people who lack the basic element of respect to abuse me like that?

You have no control over any part of the situation except whether you stay and perform. Leaving is your only weapon - use it if you must. And make sure that if this is a contracted gig that there is a clause in the contract allowing you to decide if performance conditions are too demanding and if so leave with full payment.

Again, I do not perform on the streets. And I no longer do birthday parties here for this same reason. So it may be that I am just hiding from own lack of ability to control an audience. Please factor that into my reply.

Ed


Ed:
I see your point, but you mention here people of other cultures...very good! In the culture that I work: Puertorricans, if I said: I cant continue with my show... THE AUDIENCE COMPLETE EAT YOU!! Now only you don't have the problem with the Evil Child, now you have problem with an Evil audience!! And don't have doubt if probably they say to you the VERY BAD AND ERRONEUM but popular phrase of: Treat with that children is YOUR work...
Thanks,
Hansel!
Follow Me...
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Hansels-Comedy-and-Magic-Show-929625643774678/
Youtube: HanselSP
Twitter: @HanselSP
Instagram: HanselSP
T. Sebastian
View Profile
Loyal user
Ozark Mountains, USA
223 Posts

Profile of T. Sebastian
Ed makes a very good point.
And it is where I am torn.
I cannot bring myself to reward horrible behaviour.
This goes against every one of my parenting principles.
But, I can't rightly tell someone else how to be a parent either.
And I certainly cannot discipline their child for them.
Conundrum.
So sorry I soiled your precious eyes.
Joseph_Then
View Profile
Special user
744 Posts

Profile of Joseph_Then
All your trick should always cater to 'evil' kids.

Always think: "What if the kid snatch the trick, screams at you, runs up, etc. at the most critical stage of the trick?"
-----



Joseph Then

Singapore Ventriloquist
magic4u02
View Profile
Eternal Order
Philadelphia, PA
15111 Posts

Profile of magic4u02
No. I consider that part of being a professional and part of learning proper crowd control. My routines are all geared for the best entertainment value only.

Kyle
Kyle Peron

http://www.kylekellymagic.com

Entertainers Product Site

http://kpmagicproducts.com

Join Our Facebook Fan Page at

http://facebook.com/perondesign
Joseph_Then
View Profile
Special user
744 Posts

Profile of Joseph_Then
I must have phrased it wrongly. Smile

I know what you mean Kyle, all routines should be maximised for best entertainment for all. But, always be prepared for naughty kids who may disturb your show so that you do not look stunned or look lost when it really happens.

That's what I mean. Smile
-----



Joseph Then

Singapore Ventriloquist
Ed_Millis
View Profile
Inner circle
Yuma, AZ
2291 Posts

Profile of Ed_Millis
There will always be circumstances - children! - beyond our control. If one is to make entertaining children the primary career goal, then one should study all the ways in which to control and direct even the most difficult children.

My oldest son is a teacher, and got thrown into a 5th/6th grade class for an entire school year! He was able to win over almost every child to his side by the end of the year. Those are the kind of kid control secrets I want to learn.

I understand Hansel's point - from the perspective of those who hired you, making this work is your job, so do it!! But ask any repairman, contractor, designer, etc. - there may well come a time when you simply have to tell the customer they have put you in an impossible situation and you cannot complete the assignment.

If I read Sebastion's original question correctly, though, he's talking about an open-forum performance - street or fair - rather than a private party. If you've been hired for a private party, you have a contract (you _do_ have a contract, don't you??!!) that states your limitations and solutions. But an open-forum venue would be quite different. At a fair, you can perhaps have fair staff on hand to help with crowd control. And you would probably have a contract with the fair management that stipulates your working conditions. On the streets, though, you've totally on your own.

I think if these were my choice of venues, I would make every effort to link up with some experienced professionals and simply shadow them for a while. Watch how they handle the crowds and individual people. Ask them all the "what if?" questions you can think of.

Again, all this is from the perspective of one who does not perform on the streets or at massive children't birthday parties for all the reasons that incited this thread. I do have some experience with children and with performing for children. When they are good, it's a wonderful time for all. But when one of them is nasty and evil, it ruins it for everyone.

Hey - maybe they would like to assist you in the Great Duct Tape Escape routine!

Ed
vincentmusician
View Profile
Regular user
Toronto
192 Posts

Profile of vincentmusician
Bad kids? Every situation is different. Regardless of what Paul Daniels said, something like, there is no such thing as a bad audience, only a bad performer. He has not done enough house kids Birthday Parties because he was wrong. There are good and bad kids. It could be from parents or other bad kids influencing their behaviour. The solution is not easy. I have walked out on Shows before I even started and told the parents to keep their money because of repeated extreme rudeness from the parents. In 25 years, luckily it has only happened twice.
Only once did I walk out because of kids behaving badly. I have a line that if crossed, I walk. Physical violence is that line. If a kid tries to kick, punch or assault me, which has happened, I walk. You do not have to perform if conditions are not comfortable for you.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The little darlings » » The Very Evil Children. (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2021 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.16 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL