The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Fiberglass? Will it work? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Illusionist11
View Profile
Loyal user
220 Posts

Profile of Illusionist11
Okay..so I want to make a roof like on the picture attached. Would this work....get a block of styrofoam, carve it how I want the shape....then cover it witht the fiberglass cloth and put the solution on top. Once it hardens, will it come loose of the styrofoam, or is there something I should do to not make it stick. Will this be failry sturdy, or like peanut brittle. If it will be brittle, will putting more coats on it help it? Please help!

Click here to view attached image.
ClintonMagus
View Profile
Inner circle
Southwestern Southeast
3999 Posts

Profile of ClintonMagus
I can't really tell how large it is from the photo. I'm sure it can be done, but fiberglass is an awfully complicated "way to go" on something like this. If you choose to go the fiberglass route, there are a lot of onlie references that will guide you.

I don't think that the fiberglass resin will dissolve the styrofoam. The fiberglass will be very hard and sturdy. You can coat the foam with petroleum jelly or mold release, and the styrofoam should pop out, or at least easy to dig out. Make sure you have plenty of ventilation.
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
Illusionist11
View Profile
Loyal user
220 Posts

Profile of Illusionist11
Why do you say this is an awfully complicated way to go...just wondering..is fiberglass hard to work with or something?
ClintonMagus
View Profile
Inner circle
Southwestern Southeast
3999 Posts

Profile of ClintonMagus
Like I said, I can't tell from the photo how large the object is, but unless it is huge, I woudln't think that fiberglass would be the best way to proceed. It's not that hard to work with, but it is most easily applied over larger areas. If "outside" dimensions are critical, you will probably need to form it using a mold.

Here is some basic information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiberglass_molding
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
chuckn34404
View Profile
Regular user
Bend, Oregon
124 Posts

Profile of chuckn34404
Since you are planning to use styrofoam as the mold the top side or the side opposite of the foam could require lots of sanding to get it smooth. Usually fiberglass is laid up into a mold to obtain a smooth finish. Depending on the thickness of the glass cloth and the amount of resin used this could be a tough sanding project. It would be better to make a mold of the part the audience will see and let the inside be rough.
Chuckn
Illusionist11
View Profile
Loyal user
220 Posts

Profile of Illusionist11
What is a good material to make a mold out of?
ClintonMagus
View Profile
Inner circle
Southwestern Southeast
3999 Posts

Profile of ClintonMagus
Quote:
On 2008-09-16 06:31, Illusionist11 wrote:
What is a good material to make a mold out of?


Check these out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsvgaWHPMF4

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=188980

http://www.fiberglassmoldmanual.com/down......nual.pdf
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
cupsandballsmagic
View Profile
Inner circle
2706 Posts

Profile of cupsandballsmagic
Do you need fibreglass for a specific reason? If not, wouldn't 3/8" ply be an easier way to go?
Illusionist11
View Profile
Loyal user
220 Posts

Profile of Illusionist11
Yes, but I don't know how to attach pieces of that together...there so thin.
Paul Prater
View Profile
Elite user
North Little Rock, AR
483 Posts

Profile of Paul Prater
I cannot really tell the size either, but from your comment that the pieces are thin, I am assuming that the piece is relatively small.

Plywood can be attached using woodglue and nails or screws. I routinely glue 1/4" plywood, using wire brads for added strength. I then clamp everything tightly and let the glue dry. I have never had any problems.
EsnRedshirt
View Profile
Special user
Newark, CA
895 Posts

Profile of EsnRedshirt
Paulyp is correct- 1/4 plywood can be held together securely with nothing more than wood glue. Simply apply the glue liberally, clamp* the wood together tightly, and let it sit overnight. Wipe off the extra that leaks out before it dries, or sand it off the next day once it's set.

* - You can never have too many clamps in your workshop.

-Erik
Self-proclaimed Jack-of-all-trades and google expert*.

* = Take any advice from this person with a grain of salt.
lin
View Profile
Special user
California
820 Posts

Profile of lin
Oh yeah, unless you have another reason to use fiberglass, plywood should work great.

A couple more tips: try to clamp all the pieces together in one go--at least as much as you reasonably can--it'll help to keep the structure in square. Dry fit and clamp (without glue) the pieces to test that your clamps actually hold the way you expect them to; there's nothing more frustrating than having glue slopping all over while your components slide away from each other in unexpected directions. Lastly, you can use waxed paper or aluminum foil to keep pieces from glueing themselves to things you don't want them to (jigs, temporary spacers, the floor).

best of luck,

Lin
Paul Prater
View Profile
Elite user
North Little Rock, AR
483 Posts

Profile of Paul Prater
I completely agree that you cannot have too many clamps. If you are using 1/4" you don't have to have particularly strong clamps, either. Corner clamps are around $8.00 at Home Depot, Lowes, etc... However, if you are needing tools, you need to familiar with Harbor Freight. I got corner clamps on sale for $1.00 each. These wouldn't work for heavy duty projects, but for light weight stuff, these are perfectly servicable.

I don't want to get flamed here, I am NOT saying Harbor Freight stuff is great quality. In fact, most of Harbor Freights tools are NOT great quality. However, they are typically 1/3 or more cheaper than tools in the big box stores. One of their ball pien hammers is most frequently used tool and I have had it for nine years now. They are good to get the stuff you need on a low budget.
leapinglizards
View Profile
Inner circle
1263 Posts

Profile of leapinglizards
To answer the question about fiberglass. Yes you could use foam. It will stick unless.... Unless you seal it and coat it with parafin. Then give it a spray of release agent (Or in a PINCH PAM- but this could get nasty.) No release agent means that you could pour ecetone on the foam to disolve it.... Messy nasty, dangerous.

"Poor Man's Gel Coat" = get a 100% Dacron shower curtain, and use that for the outer layer, it will make things smoother, give it a top color, and need little sanding. You might be able to get similar results with Rip stop nylon, but I am not sure it won't melt as I have not tried it yet.

Remember: Fabric adds strength, resin adds weight. Rule of thumb, 1 OZ of resin for every Oz of glass cloth. Two layers plus the dacron will make for a pretty darn sturdy top.

Safety Alert: Fiberglass resin is NOT good for you. Use a respirator, do this outside, wear gloves and eye protection. Stay away from fire.

As everyone has said... Plywood would be MUCH easier.
Leaping Lizards!!! Who knew it was possible.
<BR>
<BR>www.LeapingLizardsMagic.com
ldwarf
View Profile
New user
RI
6 Posts

Profile of ldwarf
A few random thoughts on fiberglass..
.. the cheapest and most readily available resin to use is a polyester resin.. it smells and will melt a foam base..
.. another thought.. spend more money and don't buy polyester resin to begin with , use epoxy resin, it doesn't smell as bad, and doers not eat foam, you can use it , with glass to cover almost anything.. be sure to use a release agent if you intend to remove the glass layer..

if using poly resin you can simple use spray glue to attach aluminum foil to the foam to protect it , and act as a release membrane. or you can coat the foam with latex paint for a quick protective layer.. or use liquid latex if you want it to hold up to multiple uses.
...you can dissolve foam with acetone to remove it, but it isn't worth the bother.. if you are trying to cover a complex shape, I would recommend cutting the foam into pieces, then pinning it together with tooth picks before covering it with glass cloth and resin, removing the foam will be far easier .. you don't want to have to hack apart the foam.

..
think outside the box: not only can you "cover" a form with glass cloth, but you can "line" a form with glass cloth in this way you can easily unscrew the wood mould from the glass reproduction from the other side to remove it.

don't forget, you can also use wood as a mould rather than foam, it is easy to work with and smooth. just be sure to wax the wood well before glassing it.

.. I know.. talk about RANDOM thoughts... I'm just rambling here.. but I have years of experience in resin and cloth, and prop making in general, so feel free to contact me directly with questions and ill try to help.. I'm not often here so e-mail me.

be well,
Scott
a.k.a Prof. Badger
EightCornerGlobe.com
owln_1
View Profile
Loyal user
dallas /now live by tulsa
222 Posts

Profile of owln_1
Build your model out of Styrofoam, cover that with clay ( potters clay thinned down so it will brush on, make a mold in parts 1,2,3. or how ever many it takes depending on contours of your object, like a 4 legged animal would take 5 parts, cast this with Plaster of Paris, take this plaster casting and wax it well a couple of times, then mix your fiberglass and start laying it up (brush it on and squeegee it to an even coat), do this a few times (till you get a fair build up, then lay on your mat, rove, or fibers and then your done. you can pm me if you need help with a very complicated mold. I have a very slow internet connection, so I have not seen what the piece you are wanting to make looks like, but fiberglass is not really that hard to work.

Fiberglass will eat Styrofoam.
owln_1
owln_1
View Profile
Loyal user
dallas /now live by tulsa
222 Posts

Profile of owln_1
Here is a link to a taxidermy fourm were you can get all kind of information on molding and cast in a lot of different mediums. http://www.taxidermy.net/forum/index.php
Owln_1
owln_1
View Profile
Loyal user
dallas /now live by tulsa
222 Posts

Profile of owln_1
Ldwarf, I belive he know's what he's talking about, good job rambling. Owln_1
George Ledo
View Profile
Magic Café Columnist
SF Bay Area
2886 Posts

Profile of George Ledo
Quote:
On 2008-09-16 16:45, EsnRedshirt wrote:
Paulyp is correct- 1/4 plywood can be held together securely with nothing more than wood glue. Simply apply the glue liberally, clamp* the wood together tightly, and let it sit overnight. Wipe off the extra that leaks out before it dries, or sand it off the next day once it's set.

* - You can never have too many clamps in your workshop.

-Erik

A trick I learned from a woodworking magazine years ago is to use strips of masking tape to hold stuff while the glue dries. It takes a bit of practice to learn how to "pull" the tape tightly across the joint, but it works beautifully. Generally, a strip every few inches is enough. A couple of weeks ago I built a sideboard for a show, about six feet long by 30 inches high, out of 1/4" ply and pine, with 45-degree angles all over the place, and used masking tape to hold the joints until the glue dried.

* - Yes, you can never have too many clamps. Smile
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
www.georgefledo.net

Latest column: "Sorry about the photos in my posts here"
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Fiberglass? Will it work? (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.22 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL