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Mr. Ray
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Hello everyone! I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this, but here it goes: Are there any lathes that you recommend for coin gaffing (CNC or normal)? The smaller the better. Would you rather buy a shell runned by CNC machine or by hand? Wich can achieve more quality? Thanks!
I mean the smaller is better for me, because of the lack of space. Thanks for your reply!
Only one reply and it's from me..
Mr. Ray
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Only one reply and it's from me..
thegreatnippulini
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I'll choose to stay away from this topic for obvious reasons.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
Mr. Ray
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Please do not reply, I know what lathe I'm saving up for
Magic Researcher
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Mr. Ray;
You do not need a lathe (CNC or manual) to make coin gaffs. For example ... to make an expanded shell all you need is a good flat anvil, a large flat headed hammer, a post vise, and a chisel. Any highly skilled and experienced blacksmith can place the coin on the anvil and smack it once to expand it just the required amount. This expanded coin is next placed into the post vise and the backside carefully chiseled out to form the shell. The process only takes about 5 minutes - just ask any skilled blacksmith.

What I do not understand is why more blacksmiths are not cranking out these expanded shells at the current going price for them. The other mystery is why machinists waste all of that money on machinery when it is not really needed.

I say that it is time for the highly skilled and experienced blacksmiths to show us examples of the delicate magic items they produce. Any takers?
MR
Repeating a falsehood often and loudly does not make it true.
greatchach
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I would love to watch somebody chisel out a coin. All this time, who knew it could be so easy?
Tom Bartlett
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Quote:
On 2009-02-11 15:32, Magic Researcher wrote:
Mr. Ray;
You do not need a lathe (CNC or manual) to make coin gaffs. For example ... to make an expanded shell all you need is a good flat anvil, a large flat headed hammer, a post vise, and a chisel. Any highly skilled and experienced blacksmith can place the coin on the anvil and smack it once to expand it just the required amount. This expanded coin is next placed into the post vise and the backside carefully chiseled out to form the shell. The process only takes about 5 minutes - just ask any skilled blacksmith.

What I do not understand is why more blacksmiths are not cranking out these expanded shells at the current going price for them. The other mystery is why machinists waste all of that money on machinery when it is not really needed.

I say that it is time for the highly skilled and experienced blacksmiths to show us examples of the delicate magic items they produce. Any takers?
MR

I think your claim that to make an expanded shell all you need is a good flat anvil, a large flat headed hammer, a post vise, and a chisel. Any highly skilled and experienced blacksmith can place the coin on the anvil and smack it once to expand it just the required amount. This expanded coin is next placed into the post vise and the backside carefully chiseled out to form the shell. The process only takes about 5 minutes - just ask any skilled blacksmith is ludicrous and since you are the only one making this claim, you should be the one to prove it can be done.


There is a story about a peasant, who is invited to have dinner with Royalty because of a deed of bravery. During the dinner the peasant lacked manners, and one of the members of the court was rude to him, and berated him for his lack of social graces. The host immediately had the member of the court brought before him. The member of the court, asked why he was being treated this way, and the young prince said that while the peasant had lacked proper manners because of a lack of education; he on the other hand knew what good manner are, but decided not to use them, and was forever banned from court.
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
thegreatnippulini
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Quote:
On 2009-02-11 15:32, Magic Researcher wrote:
Mr. Ray;
You do not need a lathe (CNC or manual) to make coin gaffs. For example ... to make an expanded shell all you need is a good flat anvil, a large flat headed hammer, a post vise, and a chisel. Any highly skilled and experienced blacksmith can place the coin on the anvil and smack it once to expand it just the required amount. This expanded coin is next placed into the post vise and the backside carefully chiseled out to form the shell. The process only takes about 5 minutes - just ask any skilled blacksmith.

What I do not understand is why more blacksmiths are not cranking out these expanded shells at the current going price for them. The other mystery is why machinists waste all of that money on machinery when it is not really needed.

I say that it is time for the highly skilled and experienced blacksmiths to show us examples of the delicate magic items they produce. Any takers?
MR


Hey MR, why do you feel like blacksmiths are cavemen with beating tools?

Quote:
On 2009-02-11 15:32, Magic Researcher wrote:
- For example ... to make an expanded shell all you need is a good flat anvil, a large flat headed hammer, a post vise, and a chisel...


Congratulations, you have correctly identified 4 out of the hundreds of forging tools used in the craft of blacksmithing.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
tabman
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Unimat. The Johnson coins were prototyped on a Unimat. Cheap on Ebay. A nice outfit around $500.

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
DoctorAmazo
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I took MR's post as a joke. Wasn't it meant that way?

I know they still exist, but have you checked the Yellow Pages for "Blacksmiths" lately?? By comparison, the world is infested with Machinists...

Gotta go chisel me some coins now...I'm carving Roosevelt on a dime and penny set!
thegreatnippulini
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Blacksmithing has become a lost trade, but has experienced a renaissance as an art form and a craft. MR was being rudely sarcastic towards me due to the fact that I can actually make things from metal without the help of a quarter million dollar CNC machine and thousand dollar software.

Check out http://Anvilfire.com/gurusden and ask around. You'll find hundreds of talented craftsmen (like myself) with a collective experience of centuries worth of knowledge.

Funny tidbit: coins were struck by hand for thousands of years before modern equipment stamped them out by the millions. The top mold was held by the left fist, bottom mold in a stump. Top was struck with the right fist holding a mallet. This is where the term "making money HAND OVER FIST" comes from.

Quote:
On 2009-02-11 15:32, Magic Researcher wrote:
Hey MR, why do you feel like blacksmiths are cavemen with beating tools?


http://www.anvilfire.com/gallery/comics/sage/caveman_660.jpg
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
Magic Tad
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I have been a blacksmith for over thirty years. I consider my self fairly handy and it is just not as simple as you said to make gaffed coins. Just try to make something your self. Most of my tools are hand made and my father is a black smith. Craftsmen should be revered, the most skilled are my heros. Please do not make light of some ones skills. Magic Tad
Cyberqat
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Oooooh. That Unimat is a cool tool.

I have another toy for my someday wish list...
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
jazzy snazzy
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Cyberqat, this place in Monson, MA refurbs Unimats...

http://www.tomstoolstore.com/servlet/StoreFront
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
Cyberqat
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Cool! I wonder how far Monson is from Boston, where I am...
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
jazzy snazzy
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On the way to Springfield. We should check them out some time.
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
judoruss2003
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[quote]On 2009-06-19 09:23, thegreatnippulini wrote:

Funny tidbit: coins were struck by hand for thousands of years before modern equipment stamped them out by the millions. The top mold was held by the left fist, bottom mold in a stump. Top was struck with the right fist holding a mallet. This is where the term "making money HAND OVER FIST" comes from.

--------------------------------------------------------

I'm afraid I disagree with this statement. Making money hand over fist has a nautical background, whereby the sailors who could climb or pull ropes or haul in nets the fastest would make the most money. Either way, it is about pulling ropes hand over fist, and not stamping money hand over fist.
thegreatnippulini
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That MAY be... I love a good INTELLIGENT debate, please, disagree all you'd like Smile. The coining pre-dates the sailors (according to my references, which are actual books [you know, those big thick things full of paper with words printed on them?], NOT wikipediae or other internet "references"). Sailors pull ropes hand over HAND for pretty much all rigging on a boat, not JUST hauling in a catch. As Billy Joel stated it best "you may be wrong but for all I know you may be right".
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
Bill Hegbli
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Your prayers have been answered!!

James P. Riser, the worlds most knowledgable and greatest machinest in the world, has just released his knowledge on how to machine a Scotch and Soda Coin set. His publication will be in the form of an E-book and will only cost $5.00 to download.

Two other titles are also available, with more to come.

Now you can learn how the experts do it!

http://www.jamesriser.com/Magic/JamesRiserMagic.html
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
vampiro
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I have worked with small metalworking machines for about 20 years. Does anyone know how to make a good expanded shell?
I would like to try it for fun because of all the metalworking experience I have.
thanks,
Scott
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