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Levent
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Hi Guys:

Just a little update. I was checking my computer files and it turns out that I happened to have the color film of Arthur Buckley doing his card and coin act, shot it the late 1940s. I looked at the card routine and it is move for move exactly the same routine as in the YouTube clip.

I am happy to say that there can be no doubt, I am 100 percent certain that the man on the video IS Arthur Buckley!

Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com
JamesinLA
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Levent!
Thanks for clearing that up. You have to be part detective as a magic historian and that is on display.
I read through Ganson's three billiard ball routines last night from routined manipulation and in it he devoits a full page to the famous Cardini monicle steal of one of his 8 balls.
I remembered that one page made an impression on me as a young boy. I didn't have any idea who Cardini was at the time, but it was clear from Ganson's writing that he was an important magician and that that famous steal was important as well. It made me appreciate all the more the wonderful gift you have given to us all in recreating the Cardini ball routine. Thank you.

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
Levent
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Hi Guys:

In case anyone still doubts that the man in the YouTube video that is labeled "Lewis Ganson" is in reality the fine Australian magician Arthur Buckley (1890-1953), I've uploaded some photographic proof. In the photos the left side of the image is from a film of Arthur Buckley recorded by the famous ventriloquist Edgar Bergen, the right side is from the aforementioned YouTube video clip.

Please note that the film in the YouTube clip has been accidentally flipped in the projector when it was TeleCine converted. In other words the film was put in the motion picture projector the wrong way, so that it is a mirror image of reality. I can tell that this happened because the jacket pocket that holds the handkerchief is in the right breast. Also the close up shots of the playing cards show that the pips are on the wrong side. I have downloaded the video and digitally corrected it so that the images are correct.

In the first photo you can see the face, eyeglasses and ears are the same.

In the second photo you can see that the balding pattern of his hair is the same.

In the third photo, Buckley is doing the same card routine with the same body language.

And finally if you look at the YouTube video there is something that is tough to see, but if you understand the techniques of Buckley, it is very telling. Look at the YouTube clip right after the ball routine at around the time counter number 3:12. After he places the top hat down on the table, he produces a coin from a back clip. This is the Buckley coin production number one, that I taught on the first disc of my "Ultimate Guide to The Miser's Dream" DVD set. If you don't have my DVDs, you can see me demonstrate this move on my website on the Misers Dream Video Trailer at the time counter number :51 This is an extremely difficult coin production move! And to the best of my knowledge, Arthur Buckley was the only manipulator to perform it. The flawless and beautiful way that he executes this coin production, brings tears to my eyes.

As an entertainer I am not crazy about the repetitive sequences with the balls at the beginning of the video. But we don't know the context it which this was filmed. Because he seems to be doing ball move after ball move, directly from his excellent book "Principles and Deceptions" (1948), I get the feeling that this was not a recording of his act per se, but actually a demonstration film somehow tied to his book.

Frankly I am astounded by his level of skill with wooden billiard balls. If I ever had the slightest doubt about his ability to do the stuff from his books. That doubt is gone. Thanks to this video and the other films I have with his coin and card work, I can say that Arthur Buckley was a sleight of hand master and this video is a treasure and a testament to his skills.

Best regards to all,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com

P.S. I want to thank JamesInLA for bringing this video to our attention and thanks for your comments about my Cardini recreation!!!

Photo Number 1

Click here to view attached image.
Levent
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Levent
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aiturran
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That is some amazing research.
I think we will now have to name you as Levent "Holmes" or something. Smile

Great work, and I love everything related to magic history and classic magis, so I look forward seeing more of your work. If I have anything to collaborate, I'll surely let you know!

Antonio
Anatole
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Levent's detective work underscores once again the axiom that anything posted on the Internet should be corroborated from other sources.

Re Ganson--I keep hoping that the 8mm card manipulation films he made for Harry Stanley's Unique Studios will be released on DVD. I think I heard that it is not likely that they will be released because of the more recently released DVDs of routined manipulations (e.g. Jeff McBride's series) which are more detailed and up-to-date. Also the audio commentary that accompanies the recent DVDs would be missing from the Ganson films, which were silent. However, I feel that the historical value of those films justifies their archiving and dissemination to the magic community. Audio commentary from respected manipulators of today could be made an option on a second audio track, like the commentary options popular with full-length movie DVDs.

Related to Ganson... Can you think of any card manipulators of note who actually implemented the changes he suggested in the "Card Magic by Manipulation" sections of _Routined Manipulation Finale_, especially the idea of producing fans limited to eight cards rather than producing a fan of the complete stock? I liked Ganson's reasoning and practiced that technique assiduously, but in the end decided to go with the standard technique. The discrepancy that Ganson noted is valid, but it is something I think only an experienced card manipulator might notice. I doubt that true lay audiences would notice any discrepancy at all.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
----- Sonny Narvaez
Bill Hegbli
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That is truly wonderful, I purchased the Buckley books years ago and they are among my favorite material on manipulation magic.

I especially loved his transition move from Coins to Cards. It has solved a change in my coin and card work. We must really think the Gamblers Book Club for reprinting these book way back when.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
JamesinLA
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And I was thinking that that video showed that Ganson had some real chops. I didn't know about the 8mm film that exsists of Ganson but certainly it should be preserved and diseminated.

Jim
Oh, my friend we're older but no wiser, for in our hearts the dreams are still the same...
Jacques
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I agree with Levent that this film look like a demonstration of sleights from Buckley's book "principles and deceptions", more than a standard act. I whish I had this film years ago when I started manipulating balls and coins. It would have help me with timing, synchronisation of movement, angles, etc.
This confusion between Ganson and buckley is strange. These two men don't look alike. And to add to this, I had these two books side by side in my bookshelf for years.
Levent
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Thanks Guys!

I'm glad you've all appreciated the research. This is exactly how I analyze all the magic from my instructional DVDs as well as my literary projects such as the Benson book. Except in this case, all I had to go on was the files on my laptop. I can do a much better job if I have access to my magic library at home.

Frankly, I wish I could find a cleaner copy of that Arthur Buckley footage so that I could examine the eight ball routine better. I know it from his book, but it was very cool watching him do it in tempo. Also his ball rolls, whilst secretly palming a ball are amazing! When I saw the two sound films of Buckley performing his entire Miser's Dream routine, I realized that he was a very good performer. Certainly by today's standards, his patter and style is very old-fashioned, but he performed with confidence and poise and I certainly have a lot of respect for the strength of his technique. What really blows my mind is that when these films were shot, Buckley had been retired from show business for about 15 years and had been making his living as an electrical engineer, yet he is doing amazingly difficult sleight of hand. The fact that so many of his sleights are executed while gazing out into the audience, shows how skillful he was. Also I must mention that by studying Arthur Buckley's mixing of patter with manipulation (in his Miser's Dream routine), I was able to gather a much better understanding of his idols: T. Nelson Downs and Allan Shaw.

Now I would like to say a few words in appreciation about Lewis Ganson. I have read all of his books and I have read every single issue of the magic magazine "The Gen" which Ganson had edited. And let's not forget that he was the person entrusted by Vernon and Slydini to write their most important books. When I was a child, his "Routined Manipulation" volumes and "Card Magic by Manipulation" were my constant companions. I believe that Lewis Ganson was no less than the "Professor Hoffman of Manipulative Magic". As a writer in this field, I cannot give a higher compliment.

As far as his technical skill was concerned, I have no doubt he could do all the sleights in his books. Many years ago, I DID see the 8mm films of Ganson that Harry Stanley produced and my memory of it was that they were perfectly OK. These films showed the sleights, but they really didn't reveal the performing ability. The real question I asked of Billy McComb (in 2005) and Patrick Page (in 2008) while I was working in England was "What kind of showman was Ganson?" By that, I was asking if her was a strong entertainer? They both gave me pretty much the same response. They felt Ganson's real magical gift was in writing and teaching our Art to his fellowman. Conversely, we have Cardini and Kaps who were titanic showmen, yet they left us with very little written insight into their craft. To me, in their own way, ALL of these men are my heroes.

Best regards to All,
Levent
http://www.LeventMagic.com
http://www.MagicQandA.com

Some personal responses below:

JamesInLA: I also first read about the Cardini monocle steal in Ganson's book. It was great fun putting it within the Cardini 8 ball routine in my Billiard DVD. Especially since it will give the young magicians a glimpse as to how clever Dick Cardini was. When I was at the SAM Convention in Atlanta this year, I showed my recreation of Cardini to a few old-timers that actually saw the Master work and I am pleased to say that they told me I got it right.

Antonio: Thanks, my friends tell me that I am a C.S.I. Detective for dead manipulators. Smile
One of the things that I have learned over the years is that when it comes to technique, there is an infinite way of doing magic poorly, but when you do it correctly the technical choices are far more limited.

Sonny: I am very curious about where that YouTube video came from and who told the posters that it was Lewis Ganson? Very strange!
The cost of transferring the Ganson 8mm films to video is very cheap. If they keep the price of the DVD reasonable, I think a lot of people would buy it, even for historical reasons! Your idea of doing an audio commentary is terrific.
Regarding the production of a limited stock of cards as per "Card Magic by Manipulation" I agree with you that Ganson is trying to solve a purely academic problem. Personally, I'll stick with Charlie Miller's statement, "Don't run, when no one is chasing you" and therefore I always produce the full stock and only drop about 2 or 3 cards. That said, in the past I have seen the great Japanese magicians: Haruo Shimada and Masafumi Sakoh do the Ganson style split fan very effectively. Also, I have film of Buckley himself doing Ganson style split fans. So perhaps we should call them Buckley style split fans?

Wmhegbli: Yes, It was great that the Gamblers Book Club made the reprints of the so-called "Buckley Trilogy." I bought my one and only copy of "Principles and Deceptions" in paperback at a used book store in Brooklyn when I was about 12 years old. I paid $2.25 and it's safe to say that I got my money's worth! HA
Anatole
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While on the topic of Arthur Buckley, I thought I might bring up Geoffrey Buckingham. The two last names have the same first syllable, and _It's Easier Than You Think_ and _Principles and Deceptions_ are great books on manipulation. I've seen the Videonics lecture tape of Buckingham, as well as a clip from a FISM appearance.

One performer I wish I had seen is Ron McMillan, author of _Symphony of the Spheres_. In his act he used some traditional methods for secretly obtaining balls, but the method that intrigued me was his spring-loaded device. I think I saw a FISM videoclip of Petrick's billiard ball manipulation and he might have been using the McMillan holder.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
----- Sonny Narvaez
Bill Hegbli
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I got to see Ron McMillan at a magi convention one year. It was very good, but he only did his coin manipulations from his book he later published. Tannen once sold a spring loaded gimmick but never got around to purchasing them.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
Jacques
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Anatole, you bring two books from which the billard balls routines made me suffer. I remember struggling to get at 12 balls as in Geoffrey Buckingham's routine. From his book, it look like serious buziness, but I was surprised to discover that he was presenting it in a comical manner, like in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7-jOfPNnEc
Ron McMillan "Symphony of the sphere is even more painful, he reach fourteen balls!
I never performed with as much balls as these. I stoped at five. Too scared.
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Jacques,
I think the whole concept of trying to produce 12 balls and holding on to all of them without dropping any is a somewhat comical situation, as if the balls are multiplying out of Buckingham's control, a plot not unlike "The Sorceror's Apprentice" where the brooms are multiplying out of control. To me it's like Buckingham starts out confident that he has complete control over the balls that appear, but that as the number of balls increases, his confidence begins to fade until he just gives up. I think Buckingham is trying to express bewilderment rather than out-and-out comedy by his predicament.

When you think about the premise of productions in manipulative magic in general, the magician usually produces items and immediately discards them into a top hat or champagne bucket. Perhaps Buckingham is trying to assert his control of the situation by conscious determination not to let the annoying balls disturb his savoir faire. In the end, he just gives up.

To use an example from gimmicked/apparatus routines, the original passe passe bottle and glass effect evolved from a so-so routine with one bottle and one glass to a very comical effect of the bottles multiplying in a very annoying fashion. Annoyance is a subtheme in many magic presentations, as is the plot of "the magician in trouble." Sure, Buckingham could have produced balls one-at-a-time in a kind of "Miser's Dream with balls" fashion. But I think that would have gotten old after a while.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
----- Sonny Narvaez
Levent
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Sonny:

That's funny that you should mention that both men had the same first syllable in their names. Here's another coincidence, from what I understand both Buckley and Buckingham were electrical engineers! How weird?

By the way, I loved that lecture video of Buckingham, just terrific! I seem to have lost it, but years ago I had a video of Buckinghams entire act from the 1979 Brussels FISM and it was wonderful, seeing him do the full act!

I never saw Ron McMillan perform but I spent some time with him at the New York Magic Symposium in 1982 and he was a really, really, really nice guy and I was sorry to hear about his death. When I was at Blackpool, England this year I visited the dealers booth run by McMillan's family, I was told that they used to have a VHS video of McMillan in PAL System, but they were sold out and they were planning to re-release it in a region-free DVD in the future. I hope it works out as I will be the first person to order it! I used to have the spring-loaded ball holder when I was a kid and I did not have much luck with it. Also the spring was a little bit noisy when the ball shot out of your jacket, but I guess with music playing the audience wouldn't hear it. I would love to see Mr. McMillan use that gadget from his book as I am sure he could really make it work.

Levent
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Anatole
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Levent,
I remember seeing a video of Petrick and Mia performing--might have been one of the FISMs--and in his billiard ball routine, I think Petrick may have been using the McMillan holder, because there was no normal "tell" to when the balls were stolen, and the position of Petrick's hands during the routine suggest that the McMillan holder (or something like it)might be what he used.

----- Sonny
----- Sonny Narvaez
ChristopherCool
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I would have to say one of my favorite manipulation acts of all time is James Cielen. He won the gold medal and peoples choice award at IBM a long time ago. One of the first guys to use the colored doves. I can't find is original competition piece, but here is a little bit of it. If anybody can find the video for the complete dove act, please share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70dAQqVPUI4
Bill Hegbli
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Quote:
On 2010-11-26 23:42, ChristopherCool wrote:
I would have to say one of my favorite manipulation acts of all time is James Cielen. He won the gold medal and peoples choice award at IBM a long time ago. One of the first guys to use the colored doves. I can't find is original competition piece, but here is a little bit of it. If anybody can find the video for the complete dove act, please share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70dAQqVPUI4

He sells a DVD of his act here: http://dovemagic.com/magicmore2.html scroll to bottom.

Here is his web site: http://www.dovemagic.com/index.htm
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship

"Magic With A Twist Of Comedy"
Anatole
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The use of colored doves in magic goes back five decades or more. There was some discussion in the magazines back in the 60's or 70's suggesting that the practice of coloring doves for magic be discontinued on the grounds that it was "unnatural." My personal feeling is that the silks used in a dove act provide all the color that is needed. In fact, the white of the dove's natural coloring is a pleasing contrast to the colors of the silks and makes the appearance that more startling.

This quote from the web documents the use of colored doves at least to 1957:
-----begin quote-----
[Ron Urban] did his first professional solo show in 1957 before a crowd of about 600 people at the Green's Crystal Terrace in Duluth, Minn. It was there that he unveiled a unique act that truly set him apart from other magicians.
Urban's "Pastels" employed 15 doves, each dyed a bright color. Highlights of the show included his producing a dove from inside a balloon and a continuous conjuring of colorful doves from his bare hands.
-----end quote-----
(retrieved 11/28/2010 from http://bryan-keith.angelfire.com/details/2719.html)

Interestingly, the URL cited above also shows Ron Urban presenting a tiger illusion, which also was fairly innovative at the time.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez
----- Sonny Narvaez
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