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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » When did "Hawaii" become "Hawai'i"? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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ClintonMagus
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Is this something recent, or have I been missing something?
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
MagicSanta
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I didn't know that. A few years ago San Jose got that lil' duhicky betwen the s and e which cost the city a fortune (that mayor was run out of office later) to change on everything and I think they finally gave up since most people didn't know how to get that thingy up there or why it is there in the first place. The world is so cute and PC now.
stoneunhinged
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It's a very old way of writing Hawaii, actually.

Is it now official or something?
MagicSanta
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Clearly it is likely the old 'correct' spelling. That is the same reason they wanted the duhicky in San Jose.
cfrye
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In Hawaiian, as in most Polynesian languages, you pronounce each vowel separately. The apostrophe indicates there's a type of pause (technical term: glottal stop) between the i's.


Curt
Turk
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Curt,

You glottal stop with the erudite comments. (grin)

Let's get together sometime soon.

Mike
Magic is a vanishing Art.

This must not be Kansas anymore, Toto.

Eschew obfuscation.
Scott Cram
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Oh, sure, they'll go out of their way to put in PC marks in San Jose, Hawaii, and other places, but just try to get tourists, politicians, and dignitari......orrectly.
ClintonMagus
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Like Mis'sis'sip'pi? Smile

Quote:
Oh, sure, they'll go out of their way to put in PC marks in San Jose, Hawaii, and other places, but just try to get tourists, politicians, and dignitaries to pronounce Nevada correctly.


Depends on where you're from, I guess. In Missouri, it's "nuh-VAY-duh"...
Things are more like they are today than they've ever been before...
critter
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I think that a Southerner was just trying to ask how you were doing.
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
critter
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Incidentally, my psychology professor defines political correctness as "lying to stay out of trouble."
"The fool is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."
~Will Rogers
MagicSanta
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Hey! If you watch that Nevada video (and yes, people here freak out about how you pronounce the state, I learned because as a Southerner I said Navadah) they show a yellow building and go inside a place called Heidies. That is where I'm going in ten minutes! The manager is my wifes best friend.
Scott Cram
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Quote:
On 2009-03-12 07:00, ClintonMagus wrote:
Like Mis'sis'sip'pi? Smile

Quote:
Oh, sure, they'll go out of their way to put in PC marks in San Jose, Hawaii, and other places, but just try to get tourists, politicians, and dignitaries to pronounce Nevada correctly.


Depends on where you're from, I guess. In Missouri, it's "nuh-VAY-duh"...


Then Missouri is pronouncing it wrong. Regardless of where you're from, it's neh-VA-duh.
stoneunhinged
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So some tourist keeps hearing "Ha wai i" sometimes and "Ha vai i" others. Frustrated, he asks his tour guide for a definitive answer.

"Ha vai i" comes the answer.

"Thanks" says the tourist.

"You're velcome," says the guide.



Old, and very stupid joke.

Hawaiian is actually a fairly easy language to pronounce. Here's a story, Santa style.

My high school had a graduating class of 12, as I recall. Seven boys, five girls. (Lanakila Baptist High School, Ewa, Hawaii, class of 1981.) Some intellectual decides that we should sing some Hawaiian song during the graduation ceremony. Not a big deal, since once you've learned the tune and know how to pronounce Hawaiian, all you have to do is read and sing.

However, Ms. Intellectual (an ex-girlfriend) thinks we should also hold hands while we sing. The boys, being in the majority, succeed in vetoing this idea.

So graduation night comes. We're in our robes, standing on a platform, and we have to sing this stupid song. And we start, and all the girls grab our hands, and not only are we holding hands as we sing, but the girls raise our hands in the air and sway us back and forth as we sing.

The guys were NOT happy.

EPILOGUE: Ms. Intellectual, an ex-girlfriend, was the absolute first person I found using Facebook. She's a wonderful woman, mother of three, and we now laugh about all the silly teen-age War of the Roses stuff that we pulled after our break up.

I wish I could remember the name of the song. Maybe I'll ask her.
S2000magician
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Quote:
On 2009-03-12 03:17, cfrye wrote:
In Hawaiian, as in most Polynesian languages, you pronounce each vowel separately.

Apparently not, as the "ai" is a diphthong; if you pronounced each vowel separately, Hawaii would have four syllables - haw-waw-ee-ee - and Hawaiian would have five - haw-waw-ee-ee-ahn.
stoneunhinged
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You smart guys crack me up!

Now, I don't a diphthong from a diaphragm, but I think cfrye meant "vowel sounds".

Is "diphthong" the technical word for "vowel sound"?
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2009-03-12 14:01, stoneunhinged wrote:
You smart guys crack me up!

Now, I don't a diphthong from a diaphragm, but I think cfrye meant "vowel sounds".

Is "diphthong" the technical word for "vowel sound"?


I think it's skimpy underwear for a goof.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
S2000magician
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Quote:
On 2009-03-12 14:01, stoneunhinged wrote:
Is "diphthong" the technical word for "vowel sound"?

Yup. Two vowels blended into a single sound, as "oi" in "coil".

Also known as a digraph, just to complicate the mixture.
cfrye
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Apparently there's been a transition from the pure Polynesian pronunciation pattern to a more westernized approach in common usage. The web page at http://www.friesian.com/hawaii.htm#pronounce , written by Kelley L. Ross, Ph.D., Department of Philosophy, Los Angeles Valley College, notes that:

"In "Hawai`i" itself, a four syllable word (or three, if "ai" is regarded as a diphthong) of unknown meaning (although claims and speculation abound), the stress is clearly on the /wá/: /hawái`i/."

The phonetic breakdown indicates that the stress occurs on the /a/ and there is no mark indicating the /ai/ is blended, so it appears /ai/ is not treated as a dipthong in technically "correct" pronunciation. That said, I certainly agree that the /ai/ is often blended in common usage. So we're both right!



Curt
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2009-03-12 14:18, S2000magician wrote:


Also known as a digraph, just to complicate the mixture.


Oh sure, bring discreet mathematics into the discussion, will ya?

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
stoneunhinged
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OK, this is old information, but here goes:

Back in the day (the mid-seventies...I'm getting OLD), the vast majority of native born islanders (not Hawaiians, mind you, who were only 2% of the population back then), pronounced it:

Huh Wah Ee.

For what it's worth.

(Oh, and if a philosophy professor in California can be an expert on pronouncing Hawaiian, what does that make me...as a twisted, drunk, renegade, magic-loving philosophy Ph.D. who teaches business English in Germany but grew up in Taiwan and Hawaii? I'm one strange dude. Keep your distance. Sick Burn! on myself!)
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