The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Boxes, tubes & bags » » Sing Toy Checkers Thru Silk (3 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Walking Bob
View Profile
Elite user
490 Posts

Profile of Walking Bob
Does anyone know anything about a routine called Sing Toy Checkers Thru Silk?

Any info would be appreciated!!!

Walking Bob in Iowa
Michael Baker
View Profile
Eternal Order
Near a river in the Midwest
11167 Posts

Profile of Michael Baker
Seems to me I've heard of this. It made me think of the Die thru Silk, and possible similar methods.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Jef Eaton
View Profile
Special user
518 Posts

Profile of Jef Eaton
It'a an old MAK magic thing with a stack of wooden checkers and a metal tubular cover with a top. You cover the checkers with a silk handkerchief and then the tube and the checkers apparently penetrate the hank a few at a time. I think (flinner) John Mendoza had or has one on ebay. I hope that helps.
Regards,
Jef Eaton
kandumagic.com
<BR>jjeaton@aol.com
<BR>Creator of what my Mom thinks are the funniest kid show props around!
Spellbinder
View Profile
Inner circle
The Holy City of East Orange, NJ
6438 Posts

Profile of Spellbinder
SING TOY was invented by by U.F. Grant in 1959. The patter for the trick is appropriate for today's financial market.

A stack of four wooden checkers, alternately red and yellow, are introduced and covered with an 18-inch silk. A metal cover is shown and is used to cover the silk and checkers.

The patter tells of a Chinese financier who cornered the silk market. First, silk went down two points. (The cover is lifted and without any false moves, the silk is shown to be in the center with two checkers above it and two below it). Although all his financial advisors told him to buy, Sing wouldn't do it. You repeat the maneuver and the silk is shown under all four checkers. Sing Toy's magic checkers predicted silk would hit bottom at four points.

Sing bought at the bottom price. Then the stock rose two points(the silk is again in the center of the stack of checkers). The advisors told him to sell, but Sing looked at his magic checkers and waited until the silk was at the top. The silk is now as it was at the beginning of the effect, and the cover is shown empty. At that point Sing sold and ever since then, Sing has been singing with joy. In fact they named one of the leading American Institutions after him... "Sing Sing." In 1959, the trick sold for $8.75. I bet it's selling for many more checkers today, if you can still find one. However, it's easily made by the "Do-It-Yourself" magician.
Professor Spellbinder

Professor Emeritus at the Turkey Buzzard Academy of Magik, Witchcraft and Wizardry

http://www.magicnook.com

Publisher of The Wizards' Journals
OHCollector
View Profile
Regular user
132 Posts

Profile of OHCollector
MAK put out a routine for it about a Chinese weatherman.
garymey
View Profile
New user
gary meyer
22 Posts

Profile of garymey
I am 12 years late to this post .I pulled out my original U.F. Grant Sing Toy Checkers Through Silk (bought about 1960) The instructions are the Chinese weatherman routine which one would never do today but the idea of it being a weather device helps explain the two holes in the side of the can(essential to making the effect work) if you want ot hand it out for inspection. Here is what I looks like. https://picclick.com/UFGrant-Vintage-Sin......482.html

I did the effect for a family gathering of 20 people as part of a 30 minute show and it was loved by young and old.
David Todd
View Profile
Inner circle
2062 Posts

Profile of David Todd
Quote:
On Nov 28, 2021, garymey wrote:
I am 12 years late to this post .I pulled out my original U.F. Grant Sing Toy Checkers Through Silk (bought about 1960) The instructions are the Chinese weatherman routine which one would never do today but the idea of it being a weather device helps explain the two holes in the side of the can(essential to making the effect work) if you want ot hand it out for inspection. Here is what I looks like. https://picclick.com/UFGrant-Vintage-Sin......482.html

I did the effect for a family gathering of 20 people as part of a 30 minute show and it was loved by young and old.



I have nothing to contribute to the topic, except to add the photo from the link you posted , because eBay links tend to disappear after a short time. (so with the photo posted here , at least people looking at this topic in the future will be able to see the prop.)

Click here to view attached image.
Dan Ford
View Profile
Special user
Illinois
594 Posts

Profile of Dan Ford
I have the exact trick and it does go over quite well and is seldom seen. It can be a real fooler with the right story. Never heard of the Chinese financier story before, but it could very well be used in todays market.
dragonash
View Profile
Veteran user
the sticks
362 Posts

Profile of dragonash
It always surprised me how good the effect looked. It just didn't seem it would be convincing.
David Todd
View Profile
Inner circle
2062 Posts

Profile of David Todd
Quote:
On Apr 29, 2009, Spellbinder wrote:
SING TOY was invented by by U.F. Grant in 1959.

... it's easily made by the "Do-It-Yourself" magician.


I'm surprised that back 2009 when Prof. Spellbinder posted he did not mention the e-book available from Magic Nook (Jim Gerrish and Professor Spellbinder) called "Check-R-TriX" (maybe this e-book had not been published at that time?).

Image



In the booklet "Check-R-TriX" Jim Gerrish shows you how to make the Sing Toy Checkers and also Checker-X , which was invented by Arturo (Arthur Glen Babbs) and marketed by U.F. Grant. Jim Gerrish also explains a clever addition to Checker-X that allows you to remove the checkers one-by-one in the order called for by an audience member. (this is not part of the standard presentation in the version from MAK Magic , which I think is still available , although it's not difficult to make it yourself if you have a power drill press and a 4” diameter hole saw to make the wooden checkers). The e-book also contains an extensive discussion of "The Blue Phantom" trick and version of the Blue Phantom effect that does not use a metal tube to cover the checkers, but instead has the checkers strung together on a rope, covered with a handkerchief. AND several other effects with over-size wooden checkers. https://www.magicnook.com/WizJ35/wizj35-03Check-R-TriX.htm

In the book, Jim Gerrish recommends:

"If you have a steady hand, you can cut out the checkers with a hand drill; otherwise I advise that a drill press be used."

I already have the commercial version of Checker-X put out by MAK Magic, but if I were going to make up a new set or any of the other wood checker tricks in the e-book I do NOT have a drill press or a workshop beyond my small kitchen table and some simple hand tools, so my solution would be to purchase some pre-cut 1/2" thick 4" diameter wood circles (I have searched and can not find pre-cut circles that are 3/4" thick or 1" thick , only 1/8" , 1/4" and 1/2" thick pre-cut circles), then spread a thin layer of wood glue on the surface of one of the 1/2" thick circles and align another of the 1/2" thick circles with it , clamping them together with small c-clamps for 3 or 4 hours while the wood glue sets. (then after removing the clamps I would leave the glue to cure for about 24 hours before handling the now 1" thick checkers). Sand them and then paint.

Here's a source: https://www.etsy.com/listing/779284851/u......craft-up

Image

(the photo shows a package of 5 , but to make up 4 1" thick checkers , you
would need to buy a package of 10 of these 1/2" thick circles, because each checker is two
of these circles glued together. If you can find pre-cut circles that are 3/4" or 1" thick
then that is all the better. It could be done with 1/2" thick checkers, but that just looks
too thin to me ... 1" thick -- or at least 3/4" thick -- looks better, imo. )

Then it would be easy to drill a 1/2 hole in the center of each checker.

----


OR if your funds are unlimited could just buy this nice looking version available from Stevens Magic Emporium for $75.00:

https://www.stevensmagic.com/shop/checke......-gaynor/

I think the MAK Magic version was going for around $30.00 last I looked. (mine cost $8.00 when I purchased it way back when)

.
Julie
View Profile
Inner circle
3611 Posts

Profile of Julie
I believe Check-ER-X (sp?) is described in the Encyclopedia of Rope Tricks (vol. 3). When we first bought ours, the U.F. Grant version retailed for something like $3.75 and the checkers even had "oriental" characters printed thereon. Smile

Great trick!

Julie
David Todd
View Profile
Inner circle
2062 Posts

Profile of David Todd
Quote:
On Dec 17, 2021, Julie wrote:
I believe Check-ER-X (sp?) is described in the Encyclopedia of Rope Tricks (vol. 3). When we first bought ours, the U.F. Grant version retailed for something like $3.75 and the checkers even had "oriental" characters printed thereon. Smile


I've thought about applying some oriental style decals on mine. (inspired by Ron Reid, who does such marvelous work with repainting and applying artistic decals to old props. If you don't know Ron's work, check it out here )

Image

(Ron Reid refinished Crystal Silk Cylinder)
Julie
View Profile
Inner circle
3611 Posts

Profile of Julie
Every once in awhile I will come across the checkers, red rope and the zippered bank deposit bag that protected this little "treasure" of mine. Just holding these paint-chipped props triggers many pleasant memories...

Ron's work is so meticulous and beautiful. I'm afraid if I had a set refinished by him I'd be afraid to use it! Smile

Julie

P.S.> We also have a very attractive "collectors set" made by Howard Hale (Texas/Douglas Magicland/Woodmagic products) called FRUIT CANDY NECKLACE.
David Todd
View Profile
Inner circle
2062 Posts

Profile of David Todd
Quote:
On Dec 17, 2021, Julie wrote:
When we first bought ours, the U.F. Grant version retailed for something like $3.75 and the checkers even had "oriental" characters printed thereon.


I found a photo that shows the Grant version with the oriental lettering compared to the "plain" set of checkers. The version with the oriental characters was crafted for Grant by Arturo (Arthur Glen Babbs).

Click here to view attached image.
Julie
View Profile
Inner circle
3611 Posts

Profile of Julie
Hello David,

It looks like the checkers with the the oriental lettering are set-up for a different handling for the release (reference the ball with the cord looped around the ball).

I remember Larry White outlining this particular set-up for Grant's trick in an article he authored for M.U.M. I sent him a letter (what's a letter? Smile ) with the proper information. He very graciously sent me a letter(!) acknowledging he had misremembered the correct Grant method.

This discussion has reminded me of a P&L or it might have been Thayer's, development of the vintage German ball off wand trick adapted to a checker release. This one employs a wooden ball that secures the checkers threaded onto the cord. The ends of the cord were threaded through the corners of a cloth bag with the ends of the cord being held by spectators.

I'm not certain of the spelling, but this apparatus was named POCO CHINKO. The patter supplied was somewhat somber, but entirely appropriate for its time. Good trick.

Julie
David Todd
View Profile
Inner circle
2062 Posts

Profile of David Todd
Quote:
On Dec 29, 2021, Julie wrote:
Hello David,

It looks like the checkers with the the oriental lettering are set-up for a different handling for the release (reference the ball with the cord looped around the ball).

I remember Larry White outlining this particular set-up for Grant's trick in an article he authored for M.U.M. I sent him a letter (what's a letter? Smile ) with the proper information. He very graciously sent me a letter(!) acknowledging he had misremembered the correct Grant method.

This discussion has reminded me of a P&L or it might have been Thayer's, development of the vintage German ball off wand trick adapted to a checker release. This one employs a wooden ball that secures the checkers threaded onto the cord. The ends of the cord were threaded through the corners of a cloth bag with the ends of the cord being held by spectators.

I'm not certain of the spelling, but this apparatus was named POCO CHINKO. The patter supplied was somewhat somber, but entirely appropriate for its time. Good trick.

Julie



I've seen the Thayer catalog ad for Poko Chinko , but have never seen it performed.

Image




Here are photos of another version of Checker-X with octagonal shaped checkers which was up for auction recently.

Image
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Boxes, tubes & bags » » Sing Toy Checkers Thru Silk (3 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2022 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.3 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL