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FriarShaun
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The response to Keys has been wonderful, lots of great ideas. I was now wondering since there are so many coin tricks (make them dissapear, transform them, bend them) What stories include coins? Coins are facinating in themselves, but some great stories could tranform a trick into a legend.
funsway
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old things in new ways - new things in old ways
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I have this tiny pouch from which I extract a silver and copper coin while explaining how payment for services was made in Medieval times. A craftsman like a stone cutter working on a new church might be paid a silver coin for his fortnight's labors. Doesn't seem like much, but in the 14th century he could care for his family for a month! He also received a copper coin as partial payment so that he could easily tithe that part back to the church. So, he held carefully on to the silver while the copper went into the Bishop's pocket. But alas, when he got home that night he found that he had only the copper and the wiley Bishop had the silver coin - (passing them out to spectators) No candles for the stone cutter. Maybe that's why we call them the Dark Ages. (yeh, I did an appearing candle once)
"the more one pretends at magic, the more awe and wonder will be found in real life." Arnold Furst



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Silvertongue
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For as long as space exists,
And living beings remain in cyclic existence,
For that long, may I too remain,
to dispel the sufferings of the world.
-Shantideva

Engaging in the Conduct of a Bodhisattva
FriarShaun
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Awesome story, could be adapted to a bent coin routine.

I have several ideas for a pirate story line, transforming a half dollar to a pirate coin and back again several times to introduce, using okito box as pirate chest, billet switch to have treasure map dissapear and ultimately find the missing treasure in the specs pocket ala Bobo. I need to do some research on pirates to give some depth to the story line.

The coins left on the eyes of the dead could be a good lead in on a routine.

I am drawing a blank on stories involving coins.

There are the Bible stories (30 pieces silver, widows' mite, tribute coin, 1/2 shekel in fishes mouth) but I haven't figured out how an affect can be used in these.
Silvertongue
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Is there something in particular you wish to illustrate?

I own the Relic by Outlaw effects and its a very nice piece. ESPecially good for the pirate themed. I've come up with a range of possible story lines centered around the implication that 'it reveals the truth in mens hearts.' Also I can see similar goodness coming from the Outlaw Templar.

An effect I have performed in various guises since my beginnings is the bent coin. I now center my presentation around the concept of a lucky penny and thus provide them with one. This effect can be performed nicely at a wedding -where it is a British tradition to place a penny in the brides shoe- and has a few variations.

Anyway I'll keep an eye open...
For as long as space exists,
And living beings remain in cyclic existence,
For that long, may I too remain,
to dispel the sufferings of the world.
-Shantideva

Engaging in the Conduct of a Bodhisattva
Jaz
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One story I've used with Walking halves and purse frame is a tale about a magical purse (now bagless but still holds invisible, old coins) my Aunt was given back when the coins were minted.

For me it depends on the date and origin of the coins.
Old Chinese, Egyptian and other coins make for nice tales.

The river Styx crossing?

A Leprechauns gold coin?
yachanin
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Hi All,

I wrote this some time ago for my Hopping Half routine and posted it before, but thought I'd repeat it. The wizard "Gall" is the English penny and "Kay" the half dollar.


Wizards Duel

The Wizard Gall and Wizard Kay (show coins individually)
Had met for dueling one fine day.
Now, Gall struck first, his wand did wave
And sent the other far away. (place half dollar in pocket)

But Kay returned to great surprise, (show half returned)
For he was strong and very wise.
Now Kay stood tall and with a sneer
Made wizard Gall just disappear. (place penny in pocket)

A growing sound, then thunder clap,
And in a moment Gall was back. (show penny returned)
He cast a spell hard as he could;
Now just some smoke where Kay had stood. (place half in pocket)

“So I have won!” Gall said with glee.
“No. You are not yet done with me.” (show half returned)
Then Kay invoked an ancient light
‘til Gall was taken from our sight. (place penny in pocket)

Then silence fell upon the field
Where two great wizards would not yield.
So powerful the magic used,
The Wizard Kay had vanished too! (show hand empty)

Regards, Steve
JackLangdell
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Thank you, Steve, very good routine. Jack
motown
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I've been working on a spellbound routine using a Norwegian coin with a viking ship on one side. The story would be about how The Vikings were great seamen and explorers. They traveled to many parts of the world seeking new lands and treasures (represented by coins from other countries). And when the ship returned a great treasure was poured from it. This is work in progress.

This is a case of the story coming out of something unique about the coin.
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
– Karl Germain
moualb
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In the book 'Tricks of the Imagination' Robert E Neale has a nice story called Brown Monkey Gold.
It is a classic trickster tale, about a rogue producing gold coins from a pot of mud, sells its secret but the buyers end with only a pot of mud.
puppeterry
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http://www.storiestogrowby.com/stories/silver.html
The Silver on the Hearth: a story from Afghanistan

Armenia has a version where the King claims the pot of coins as his own, but opens it to find snakes. Returned to the poor man, it is filled with coins. Whom God wishes to bless, He will bless.
TV Mc Arthur
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"They don't get better.....just faster."
Silvertongue
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Quote:
On 2009-06-13 15:19, puppeterry wrote:
http://www.storiestogrowby.com/stories/silver.html
The Silver on the Hearth: a story from Afghanistan

Armenia has a version where the King claims the pot of coins as his own, but opens it to find snakes. Returned to the poor man, it is filled with coins. Whom God wishes to bless, He will bless.


I loved that thanks.
For as long as space exists,
And living beings remain in cyclic existence,
For that long, may I too remain,
to dispel the sufferings of the world.
-Shantideva

Engaging in the Conduct of a Bodhisattva
SilvaAce
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Fargo, ND
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I usually only use 1941 Walking Liberties (love these babies) but I always tell
about the big eagle on them and how the coins like to fly from place to place. Nothing to fancy but people are always amazed by these beauties!
All you have to do to change your life, is to change your daily habits!



Carlos Silva
alibaba
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I do a brief one-coin routine while talking about "money management", how hard it is to hold on to money, even when it comes out of your ears, it disappears, etc. I pretend my hand is a "safe" and put the coin in, lock it (by pushing down my cocked thumb), then lament that money can disappear even from locked safes.
I'm as real as you think I am
The Great Smartini
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Here's my poetic script for the Hopping Half which I created way back in Feb. 2005.

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......&forum=3

Hopping Half Script

Twas purest coincidence an occurence most strange
when they met in a vending machine.
They fell head over tails, this was no small change,
He knew he wanted her for his Queen.

Once Toonie was moved to brand new Quarters
But he slipped through a hole in the glove.
His affection for Centavo transcended all borders
He found his way back through the magic of love.

Centavo once flipped, to coin a phrase
Down a small, covered well for a wish.
She used her common sense, and the very next day
She returned, though she smelt like a fish.

A collector once found Toonies 2 cents worth
He was shipped to far off Bucharest.
But though between them lay the breadth of the earth
Centavo's love didn't fail the test.

One day Centavo found herself in a pickle
And was left on a railroad track.
The train came, she wasn't worth a plugged nickle
Toonie saw she would never came back.
In pocket change heaven Centavo now resides
and through the magic of love Toonie also joined her side.

Enjoy!

jeff
Peter Marucci
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Friar Shaun wrote, in part: ". . . .I am drawing a blank on stories involving coins."

This may get you started. The following appeared in my monthly Linking Ring magazine column several years ago. It is the one trick I always have with me.

By Peter Marucci

Simplify! Simplify! Simplify!

Many of the best magic routines can be done without any gaffed props: The Professor’s Nightmare, the Miser’s Dream, variations on Two in the Hand, One in the Pocket, and a whole boat-load of card tricks.

Trouble is, a lot of magicians aren’t happy unless they have to (a) buy a bunch of expensive props or (b) learn a zillion knuckle-breaking sleights.

This offering is an ungimmicked Scotch and Soda routine, based on another ungimmicked routine in a July, 1995 Linking Ring Parade.

For those of you unfamiliar with Scotch and Soda, briefly here is the effect: The spectator is given a U.S. half dollar and a Mexican 20-centavo piece -- one large silver coin and one smaller copper coin. The magus then turns the Mexican coin into a quarter, right in the spectator’s hand.

The gimmicked version of this is well done, with a locking shell half that passes casual examination. The downside is that it is difficult to reset quickly -- and it’s expensive.

The Parade version was done with ungimmicked coins (that solves the price problem) and there was no reset (that solves the problem for table-workers). The downside (to my mind, at least) was that there were a couple of moves where you could get burned -- no big deal if you were careful, but still I figured there had to be a way around it -- and, sure enough, there was.

NO-GIMMICK SCOTCH AND SODA
Effect: The magus deftly turns the conversation to the economy and the effects of NAFTA, the free-trade deal between the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

The magus points out that, in the U.S., NAFTA stands for: “North American Free Trade Agreement,” while in Canada it stands for: “Nobody Asked For That Arrangement.”

He shows the spectator two coins, a U.S. half-dollar and a Mexican 20-centavo piece, pointing out that they are different metals and different sizes, which underscores the differences between two of the participating countries. He asks her to take both coins, put her hands behind her back, and put one coin in each hand.

He then asks her if she thinks she can identify the coins by feel alone. She replies yes (we certainly hope). He then asks her to show the U.S. half-dollar and she does so. He then asks her to show the Mexican coin but, when she opens her hand, it has turned into a Canadian two-dollar coin (a “twoonie”). The magician points out that this represents the third member of the NAFTA treaty -- the Mexican coin having disappeared “just like all those jobs that went south of the border.”

Working: You’ll need a U.S. half-dollar, a Mexican 20-centavo piece and a Canadian two-dollar coin. When you get the coins, you’ll notice that the Mexican and Canadian coins are the same size, while the half-dollar is noticeably larger.

Have the Mexican coin in your left pocket, the half and the twoonie in your right pocket. (This is simply for ease of telling them apart; you may come up with an arrangement that suits you better.)

Reach into your pockets with both hands, bringing out the Mexican coin and the half at the fingertips, while the twoonie is loosely finger-palmed in the right hand (the one holding the half).

Drop the coins on the table or give them to the spectator and let her examine them. Take the half back first with the right hand, tossing it into the left; then take the Mexican coin and apparently toss it into the left, too; in fact, you use the Bobo Switch to exchange the Mexican for the Canadian coin.

Give the half and the Mexican (actually Canadian) coin to the spectator, gently closing her hand around them. Ask her to put both hands behind her back. You demonstrate what you want her to do and, as your hands go behind your back, your right hand ditches the Mexican coin in your back pocket.

You are now clean and can devote the rest of the routine to presentation and showmanship.

Ask her if she can identify the coins by feel; if necessary, remind her that the U.S. -- being the bigger country -- has the bigger coin. Then ask her to show the U.S. coin.

After she does so, tell her that the difficult part is yet to come -- and can she show the Mexican coin. It being the only coin in her hand, she will think you are a little weird but will co-operate. When she opens her hand, however, the Mexican coin has vanished, to be replaced by the Canadian coin.

Take the money and run!

Second Thoughts: The above routine is the one that I use -- although some of you may find it too political. That’s okay; you should be coming up with your own routines, anyway.

Besides, it doesn’t have to be the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. This will work with any three coins, as long as they are noticeably different in material, one is larger or smaller than the other two, and two are the same size.

Some obvious possibilities: Three European coins and a story about the Euromarket; any coins with animals on them (the one animal escapes --from the zoo, circus, etc.-- only to be replaced by another one; well, you get the idea.

The Mexican 20-centavo piece can probably be found in the “junk box” at most coin shops (I don’t know if the coin is even in use in Mexico any more). You can probably get the Canadian “twoonie” from a friend up here in the True North. (Although, if you’re really, REALLY stuck and you really, REALLY want to do this, I’ll send you a twoonie for the two bucks plus a buck to cover postage.)

The twoonie, by the way, got its name mostly by accident. The Canadian dollar coin has a loon on the back and was called the “loonie.” It seemed a logical step, when the two-dollar coin came out, to call it a “twoonie” (or toonie). It’s a two-part coin, with a brass centre and a silver rim. Looks good -- but try carrying a pocketful around for a while!

And finally . . . don’t underestimate the impact of this routine, simply because it only has one simple sleight and no expensive props to buy.

Any working pro will tell you that there is nothing -- absolutely NOTHING -- in magic that is as effective as having the magic work right in the spectator’s hands.

Stop here; read that last paragraph again.

Now go thee and do likewise.

Peter Marucci,
200 River St., Suite 303
Fergus, Ontario, Canada
N1M 3H8
e-mail: pmarucci@cogeco.ca
FriarShaun
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I love simplified handling and a good story. I find that anymore people are surrounded by mocks, fakes, and gimmicks. You could make a platypus appear, but most people would just think it is fake, and if you pulled it out of a glitter covered box, they would know that a gimmick is involved. Even when they don't know exaclty how it is done they still know it is "fake". Now that is a problem when your art is nothing but tricks. But a great story removes the need to examine the effect. It is the story people connect with. I have had people clap at the end of a piece and ask not "how was it done" but "is that story true?" Magic.
Peter Marucci
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Unfortunately, the audience usually nods knowingly because it IS true!LOL!
Shizentai
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Eugene Burger has a lovely story on his magical voyages discs... About a master from the east and his student. Simple, but beautiful.
Dr_J_Ayala
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There is a wonderful book called 'Money Matters' by Ed Solomon. It is a book of coin effects/routines - some old, some new, all done with storytelling. I highly recommend it!

On another note: I perform an effect called Harmony Coins, which uses a small set of black, red, blue and yellow Chinese coins. I use Chinese Color Philosophy (yes, it is an actual philosophy based on the meanings and representations of colors as taught in Buddhism) as the story for it. Water/air is represented by blue, and blue usually signifies purity, etc. There is a total of four color changes At the end of the routine, I explain the half and half colored coins as being two colors that are said to work in harmony. I also had a set of harmony coins custom made in half-dollar size.

Enjoy!
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