The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The little darlings » » 5th grade show (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
mddkf
View Profile
New user
24 Posts

Profile of mddkf
Hi all,
I'm doing a 5th grade show this week. Mostly rope tricks but I wonder what you think about doing card tricks for kids this age. Are they old enough for invisible deck or a card location trick?

dan
simchamagic
View Profile
Regular user
190 Posts

Profile of simchamagic
In my opinion - certainly old enough!

You can do - cards from the mouth / card on forehead / card folded in mouth.

If you do the invisible deck - try to make it more exciting from the usual routine.

Simcha
Alikzam
View Profile
Elite user
433 Posts

Profile of Alikzam
From Silly Billy's notes he suggests that kids begin to understand playing cards, and know what the different suits are, at around 8 years old.

Good luck with your school shosws!
Ron Reid
View Profile
Inner circle
Phoenix, Arizona
2733 Posts

Profile of Ron Reid
Hi Dan:

I'm a fifth grade teacher, and have done card effects for my students many times. They love mentalism and card effects. I think the effects you've picked will go over very well.

Ron
Chad C.
View Profile
Inner circle
1521 Posts

Profile of Chad C.
Yep, fifth graders will enjoy card effects, and rope effects very well. Mentalism as mentioned by Ron also works well and is something they'd enjoy. Also, anything that will involve the teacher(s) gets a great reaction! Make the teacher look silly - not the students.

Chad
khuber
View Profile
Regular user
SLC Utah
125 Posts

Profile of khuber
I do card tricks all the time for my 5th grade DARE classes they love it!
jackturk
View Profile
Elite user
463 Posts

Profile of jackturk
The point made about the invisible deck requiring a fun
and exciting routine applies to any card trick for kids.
If you keep it fast, make it funny, and make it more about
the routine and the bits of business happening throughout
than the actual "trick" at the end, you'll keep the kids
tracking with you.

--Jack
"59 Ways To Recession Proof Your Entertainment Business -- FREE!"
http://www.GetLeadsLikeCrazy.com

"How To Make $25,000 a Year Doing Birthday Parties Part-Time"
http://www.magicmarketingcenter.com/birthdayPT
Ken Northridge
View Profile
Inner circle
Atlantic City, NJ
2242 Posts

Profile of Ken Northridge
I agree, 5th graders are ready for card tricks if you make them fun. However, in my opinion, mind blowing tricks like the invisible deck are wasted on them. Sure, they may understand something magical happened, but they will not realize the full impact of the miracle they just saw.

I've had great success with the McCombical Prediction and The Rising Card with this age.
"Love is the real magic." -Doug Henning
www.KenNorthridge.com
Ronald72
View Profile
Loyal user
Holland
249 Posts

Profile of Ronald72
Also important is variation, only card tricks and rope tricks wil soon bored them. Make your show with a lot of different tricks and make it flow from one into the other.

I have great succes with mentalisme and linking rings. Just think about it Smile
mddkf
View Profile
New user
24 Posts

Profile of mddkf
Thanks to everyone for the advice. My show is in Thursday and I'll let you know how it goes.

Thanks again,

dan
mddkf
View Profile
New user
24 Posts

Profile of mddkf
The show went great and they liked the card tricks. I ended up using a wind up robot to find a card and force with ash on the arm for a reveal.

Here is my next question, I'm used to working with younger children. The kids this age are all about how its done. There was a constant stream of " I know how you did that" after every trick. One kid even raised her to tell me how she thought a trick worked. I assume this is typical of kids this age. I replied " If you know how come tell me latter so that I can figure it out". I know "tricks" are a challenge to the audience to be figured out. Any tips for getting them to enjoy the show without focusing entirely on the "trick" part of it, or is this just typical of 5th graders?

Thanks again for all the input.
mike storz
View Profile
Inner circle
Orange, CT
1354 Posts

Profile of mike storz
Typical 5th graders. Most will tell you they, "know that one" or "I know how you did that" when in fact they have no clue.

I had a 5th grade show today and when I took out a deck of cards one of the kids said, "I know that trick". I didn't even have the cards out yet! I just went into the routine and believe it or not this kid loved the trick the most.

I typically explain to this group what's going to happen and rule out all the things they think you might be doing. Fir example, "there's no string", "there's only one yellow hanky being used", etc.

This is a hard group to perform to but if you play them right and don't let them get to you boy can it be fun!

Mike Smile
themagiciansapprentice
View Profile
Inner circle
Essex, UK
1381 Posts

Profile of themagiciansapprentice
Two weeks ago I had a girl who continually shouted out she knew how to do every trick. So I invited her to help me with a trick, she did. That was the end of the individual shouting out.

This was unusual though. Normally I involve the kids in the "it's behind you", "it's in the other hand", "you've made a mistake" business that they soon just take part in the show, rather thab trying to be different.

Maybe tricks with sucker endings can also be used but that's not me. Instead I've starting using a few minutes of sleight of hand to music to establish my credibility as a magician early in my birthday show(thank you Duane Laflin.) This seems to get much less shouting out afterwards.
Have wand will travel! Performing children's magic in the UK for Winter 2014 and Spring 2015.
Mr. Woolery
View Profile
Inner circle
Fairbanks, AK
1828 Posts

Profile of Mr. Woolery
I've only performed (if you can call it that) in classrooms, but I've done grades 1-5 at least 9 times. I found that the differences were very interesting.

Yes, the grade 5s were big on the "how" of it all. To them, it was all a puzzle to figure out. Try to get them involved in the fun of the routine. For example, I did my own simple version of the vanishing bandanna. I typed out instructions for a generic vanish (pick an object that will fit in your hand) and used a homemade devil's hank. With the first-graders, it was just a neat thing, where's the bag of jelly beans? When you bring it back can I have one? With the third-graders, I had a kid close to tears because I vanished his cheese stick (I volunteer to entertain during snack time). With the fifth-graders, there was a puzzle about where it went, of course. I did not bring it back for them, instead made a comment about how I was going to have to learn how to reverse this trick or else it would make for a very effective diet. Since I do carry a spare tire, this got a chuckle. Since I had a kid reading my instructions, I had to ask him whether they told how to bring back the item that has disappeared or not. Since the instructions didn't say anything, I let them speculate about how I managed to slip the snack into hiding without being caught. Nobody shouted out the correct answer.

Another day, I did a simple TT silk vanish and one of the girls then told me about her brother's magic set that has a plastic thumb in it for doing tricks like that. I told her "I've seen those. They are so cheesy, I mean who can't tell it is fake? You can always spot them." She agreed with me, leaving it more of a mystery than if I had claimed I never did any such thing myself. I was really pleased to read a similar denial as a strategy in Silly Billy's book. I felt proud to have come up with it myself.

I think how I would handle a kid that age telling me he knows the trick is to hand him a normal deck of cards and ask him to show everyone. Or a rope or whatever. I would not hand out a trick deck or a gimmicked trick, but I don't mind the idea of implied examination in that I can hand over a prop for a kid to try to make it work when I know it is a clean prop. The implication can either be that all my props are clean or that all of my props are fair game. If I got asked for something other than a deck of cards, a rope, or a silk, I would ask if they know how the trick is done. If not, I'd ask why they want to demonstrate. Since I am on a limited schedule, I do tend to look at the clock and say I have to finish up so I can get to the next classroom on time. But I am in a special situation. It won't work if you have plenty of time.

-Patrick
James Munton
View Profile
Inner circle
Dallas, TX
1199 Posts

Profile of James Munton
Patrick,

You are right about 5th graders. They really want to do everything for themselves at that age. That's why I always teach a magic class for 10-12 year-old birthday parties. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em!

Best,
James
LMLipman
View Profile
Elite user
Falls Church, Va.
444 Posts

Profile of LMLipman
Quote:
On 2009-06-22 22:52, James Munton wrote:
Patrick,

You are right about 5th graders. They really want to do everything for themselves at that age. That's why I always teach a magic class for 10-12 year-old birthday parties. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em!

Best,
James


And if you want to know how to teach a magic class, get James' "How to Teach a Magic Class" DVD. Great stuff on it.
Larry Lipman
Lorenzo the Great
www.lorenzomagic.com
harris
View Profile
Inner circle
Harris Deutsch
8663 Posts

Profile of harris
The last show for 5th graders I did was based on a book they were reading called Frindle. It took place during summer school at their media center. (library)

1. Effects with pens ..er frindles
2. Theatrical piece where I put on a grey wig and became the teacher in the book. Mrs Granger did not like gum chewing..which led to a routine with the gum mouth coils.
3. Coin routines such as misers dream worked for me.

(at least as of 2 weeks ago when the show took place.)

4. Vent is very popular..(thanks and a nod to Jeff Dunham and Terry Fator...)
Harris Deutsch aka dr laugh
drlaugh4u@gmail.com
music, magic and marvelous toys
http://magician.org/member/drlaugh4u
Mr. Woolery
View Profile
Inner circle
Fairbanks, AK
1828 Posts

Profile of Mr. Woolery
Harris-

Do you find that any of the older kids (grade 5s, for example) get a little "too grown up" for puppets? My kids are grades 2 and 4 and I just showed them the performance half of Terry Herbert's DVD. Both independently picked his short silly vent routine as their favorite part of the show. That's the first time I have seriously considered exploring this artform. It is harder than it seems like it should be!

Anyway, I also wanted to mention that the most popular trick with my grade 5s was actually spongeballs! If you can believe it. Last day of school I come in to do my entertainment routine and they all started asking for the red balls. That was the first trick I had done for them, about 2 1/2 months earlier! I sort of expected it to be a younger-kid trick, but the 5s wanted that one above all the others. Too bad I didn't have my spongeballs with me! I suspect they like that one because there's not much secret as to how it is done. I'm putting more balls into the mix. The trick is just when I manage to do it. Since they understand the concept, they are ready to just sit back and enjoy the effect. It makes me respect the humble sponge more than ever.

-Patrick
Dynamike
View Profile
Eternal Order
FullTimer
24098 Posts

Profile of Dynamike
I would use jumbo cards. It might not be entertaining to a lot of children when using a poker size deck. Because they might not all have good eye sight, or the spectator might flash it to the audience too fast.
John C
View Profile
Eternal Order
I THINK therefore I wrote
11888 Posts

Profile of John C
Quote:
On 2009-06-06 16:30, mddkf wrote:
Hi all,
I'm doing a 5th grade show this week. Mostly rope tricks but I wonder what you think about doing card tricks for kids this age. Are they old enough for invisible deck or a card location trick?

dan


Yes.

J
The ULTIMATE Routine Series: rebirth soon!
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The little darlings » » 5th grade show (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.15 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL