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Tony Iacoviello
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There is a wonderful trend in Chess Life magazine; perhaps "trend' is too strong a word...

Last year there was a wonderful feature on "cheating at chess". It was a wonderful article full of ideas for those in the mentalism area.

This month, there is a review of a new book on the market, "Blindfold Chess". Some wonderful quotes:
Capablanca demurred playing blindfold chess saying "I don't want to kill myself."
Russia outlawed it "because Morphy and Pillsbury died crazy."

It looks to be a wonderful read, touching on history, psychology, and technique.

Tony
H2Odesign
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Hi Tony
What month did that article run in Chess Life?

My local public library has the back issues for me to look up and I'd love to check it out.

An interesting mentalism effect would be to predict the opening move of a spectators or call out the moves while blindfolding - have you ever heard of anyone ever doing either?

Larry
Tony Iacoviello
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"Blindfold Chess" is reviewed in the June 2009 issue.
ghostgaff
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Blindfold chess is not as difficult or mentally taxing as some would be led to believe. I am by no means a chess prodigy but can still manage to hold my own in a game of blindfold chess. Admittedly it was the first game for my opponent and I so there was a board, but there where no pieces being used.

I have heard of federations with certain restrictions. One of witch is that it is generally not done to play in more than 3 games of "true"(meaning no board or pieces) simultaniousley as some individuals have passed out.

I had also heard that some psychologists use blindfold chess as a method of testing an individual's spacial thinking. It is rarely used anymore because as time went on, less and less people knew how to play chess, making the test pointless.
"The prince of darkness is a gentleman"-
"All the world's a stage, and the people merley actors."-
Shakespeare
H2Odesign
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Quote:
On 2009-06-15 02:41, ghostgaff wrote:
Blindfold chess is not as difficult or mentally taxing as some would be led to believe. I am by no means a chess prodigy but can still manage to hold my own in a game of blindfold chess. Admittedly it was the first game for my opponent and I so there was a board, but there where no pieces being used.

I have heard of federations with certain restrictions. One of witch is that it is generally not done to play in more than 3 games of "true"(meaning no board or pieces) simultaniousley as some individuals have passed out.

I had also heard that some psychologists use blindfold chess as a method of testing an individual's spacial thinking. It is rarely used anymore because as time went on, less and less people knew how to play chess, making the test pointless.


Me neither, and although I consider myself a good player of chess and spatial gifted, for some reason I have never attempted playing it blindfolded and perhaps never thought of the possible uses for this in mentalism.

The book piques my interest in this regard and will definitely find the review.
Witch brings me back to asking where was the article on cheating to be found.
Larry
Tony Iacoviello
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Larry:

Sorry, when you only referenced Blindfold Chess in your post, it seemed that, that was what you were looking for.

March 2007, cover story.

Tony
H2Odesign
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Quote:
On 2009-06-15 12:18, Tony Iacoviello wrote:
Larry:

Sorry, when you only referenced Blindfold Chess in your post, it seemed that, that was what you were looking for.

March 2007, cover story.

Tony

Thanks again Tony,
You have really inspired me to look deeper into this topic.
Besides the knight's tour, I know of little aspects of chess incorporated in magic/mentalism. Maybe someone knows more incidents of chess & mentalism?

I think this discussion of Blindfold chess has "opened my eyes" to the possibilities of using chess in my mentalism.
Here's the link for the website on the book:
http://www.blindfoldchess.net/reviews_and_press/

And I discovered this website for a chess visualization program to help those of us that haven't yet tried blindfolding themselves before a game:
http://actualdownload.com/Chess-Eye_details.html

The closest I have ever come to cheating on chess is having a book my brother gave me called "Underhanded Chess" by Jerry Sohl. It's not really on cheating, but the prospects of learning some devious devices also lends itself to magic/mentalism creations with chess.
Best wishes,
Larry
Chris K
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I was doing research at the University of California library in the mid-1990's. I don't remember for what. However, I saw a book on an adjacent shelf that was about cheating at chess. I read the book that week. I can't for the life of me, remember what it was called, or even if it was this one: http://www.amazon.com/How-Cheat-Chess-Ev......57440994

In any case, it pretty much took the whole idea of "bold" deception and ran with it. It was an interesting thought exercise and some of the stories were amusing.

Of some of the "techniques" (I hesitate to call them that), some have direct applicability to chess/mentalism cross-overs, some have direct applicability to mentalism, and some of it was stupid.

Definitely a worth-while avenue of discourse, esp. if you are a chess player. Thanks for the heads up, Tony.
Tony Iacoviello
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Any time.

One of my favorite little books is "How To Beat Your Dad At Chess", a wonderful collection of mini games, and trick, quick mates.

On Blindfold Chess, it is much easier for Intermediate players (club level) than beginners or advanced players just because of how the game is played (along lines for the most part). Beginners may be all over the place, and advanced stray off established lines. Just my opinion though.

Tony
H2Odesign
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Quote:
On 2009-06-15 16:13, Lemniscate wrote:
I was doing research at the University of California library in the mid-1990's. I don't remember for what. However, I saw a book on an adjacent shelf that was about cheating at chess. I read the book that week. I can't for the life of me, remember what it was called, or even if it was this one: http://www.amazon.com/How-Cheat-Chess-Ev......57440994

In any case, it pretty much took the whole idea of "bold" deception and ran with it. It was an interesting thought exercise and some of the stories were amusing.

Of some of the "techniques" (I hesitate to call them that), some have direct applicability to chess/mentalism cross-overs, some have direct applicability to mentalism, and some of it was stupid.

Definitely a worth-while avenue of discourse, esp. if you are a chess player. Thanks for the heads up, Tony.


Excellent Lemniscate, I'll have to get this in the hopes that it's the one you read. The prospect of using some of these methods to devise magic around chess is so intriguing, I would be surprised that there isn't more out there. After doing a search on Denis Behr's site, just 3 items were found.

Quote:
Tony Iacoviello Posted: Jun 15, 2009 4:27pm
One of my favorite little books is HOW TO BEAT YOUR DAD AT CHESS, a wonderful collection of mini games, and trick, quick mates.

On Blindfold Chess, it is much easier for Intermediate players (club level) than beginners or advanced players just because of how the game is played (along lines for the most part). Beginners may be all over the place, and advanced stray off established lines. Just my opinion though.

Tony

Tony
What a coincidence you mention the HOW TO BEAT YOUR DAD AT CHESS BOOK. I haven't seen this one either, but last week, after reading an interview with Josh Waitzkin on his book THE ART OF LEARNING, while slipping the interview into Josh Waitzkin's Attacking Chess I reread the first chapter. He relates his earliest experiences in playing chess with his father.
Now I have three "new" books to add to my Chess reading list.
They piles keep growing.
All the best
Larry
Chris K
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Quote:
On 2009-06-15 16:27, Tony Iacoviello wrote:
...On Blindfold Chess, it is much easier for Intermediate players (club level) than beginners or advanced players just because of how the game is played (along lines for the most part). Beginners may be all over the place, and advanced stray off established lines. Just my opinion though.

Tony


And mine as well. I've tried the blindfold chess thing a couple times and ended up with such an odd board (stranded pawns left and right, etc.) that I just focus on other stuff. I honestly don't remember where I picked up most of the chess tricks I use (beating or at least drawing multiple grandmasters when my own rating is a paltry 1550 for example), but this is a really fun approach. I know D. Brown did some of this in one of his shows (and there was a flood of posts on it) but I rather enjoy this element of mentalism.

There was another thread about combining interests and I totally forgot about chess. My bad.
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