The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Working around the jitters (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Gilbert
View Profile
New user
Quebec, Canada
36 Posts

Profile of Gilbert
Is there any good trick to get around the jitters when performing in front of strangers.
I got no problems performing magic tricks in front of friends or familly, but when come the idea to perform in front of an audience and strangers, I get the jitters.
One think that always go in my mind, is that, since I know how the trick is done, I have a hard time thinking that is not obvious to other, even if I done the trick before to one or two friends.
Is it possible, that after a few performance that I'll get more confidence or is it something that's always there and that you have to get use to it.
Irfaan Kahan
View Profile
Veteran user
346 Posts

Profile of Irfaan Kahan
Hello Gilbert

There are several ways to reduce the jitters:
1) Open your "set" with something simple and virtually self - working. This way you won't worry about getting caught.

2) Practice your effects until they are second nature to you. That is, to the point where your muscle memory alone can almost get you through the entire routine.

3) Know your presentation, and design it to focus attention away from any point or spot in the routine that may give away some of the method. This is known as mis-direction.

4) The more you perform, and put yourself in these challenging situations, the more confidant you will be. In fact, you probably find that the jitters just aren't there anymore one day.

I would recommend to you the "Books of Wonder" by Tommy Wonder. The effects in there are in general far beyond the capabilities of the beginner, however the psychology inherent in those effects will prove to be most valuable.

There are several more ways to get over the jitters, but what I've listed above is what has worked for me.

Also note that performing an effect with confidence is often more important than the invisible execution of a sleight.

Regards
Irfaan
I'm a Magician playing the part of an Actor
olaf911
View Profile
Regular user
Germany
104 Posts

Profile of olaf911
There are tons of posts to this topic. Try the search function please.

For me is true:
1. Performing for strangers is much easier as for family and friends.
2. Nervousness recedes with every performance done.
3. There are helpful techniques (e. g. correct breathing) to lessen nervousness.
4. There is no substitution for performance. See 2.

PS: Irfaan, you were 1 minute faster than me. Smile
J.Robert
View Profile
Loyal user
Gettysburg, PA
240 Posts

Profile of J.Robert
Join a local magic club and perform in front of them every chance you get. Everyone sitting in the room has had the shakes at some point and can relate. I had them when I first started. Performing in front of the club for every little competition or just for the heck of it is what got me used to being in front of people and got rid of the jitters. Good luck!
Ed_Millis
View Profile
Inner circle
Yuma, AZ
2286 Posts

Profile of Ed_Millis
For some people, it's always there. For others, they "break through the wall" and everything is fine. Some do great with the "old reliables" but have a near-meltdown the first time they pull out something new.

Irfaan's advice is right on. But you may find that you still get the jitters in certain situations. In addition to the excellent advice here, I'd also add that you need to remember that the jitters are not fatal! In fact, most of the time, it's somehting only you know about, and the audience never knows. Press on!

Ed
Mr. Mystoffelees
View Profile
Inner circle
I haven't changed anyone's opinion in
3616 Posts

Profile of Mr. Mystoffelees
Practice and rehearsal. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.....
Also known, when doing rope magic, as "Cordini"
DWRackley
View Profile
Inner circle
Chattanooga, TN
1909 Posts

Profile of DWRackley
Good stuff here.

I fit into the category Ed describes.

It's always there, no matter what. But I've learned what to expect, and I mentally adapt. I've learned where I tend to rush, and how long until my tongue dries out. I used to plan a disappearing water trick at this point, so I'd have an excuse to take a sip "to show the water is real".

I've also discovered that the pitch of my voice is going to change once onstage, and I make allowances for that. You may discover the same sort of things happening to you.

The fun part is that (for me) it only lasts a few minutes. By the time I'm into my third effect, I'm right at home, joking with the audience, and relaxing. I just plan that my first couple tricks get the applause without requiring any personality from me.

Tony Robbins once told a great story about two celebrity singers dealing with "adrenaline". One said he was "juiced', while the other called it a "panic attack". The thing is, they were both describing exactly the same physical sensations. The key is in what you choose to do with it.

One more thing: taking a deep breath really does help. The extra oxygen will alter the pH of the blood, making your brain function a little more clearly. Just don't hyperventilate.
...what if I could read your mind?

Chattanooga's Premier Mentalist

Donatelli and Company at ChattanoogaPerformers.com

also on FaceBook
Gilbert
View Profile
New user
Quebec, Canada
36 Posts

Profile of Gilbert
Thanks to everybody, you've been of great help. I will work on those advices.
PaxMentis
View Profile
Loyal user
Long Beach, CA
239 Posts

Profile of PaxMentis
It's OK to have butterflies, just make sure they're all flying in formation.
Break-a-leg!
Do not go where the path may lead, but go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
MagiClyde
View Profile
Special user
Columbus, Ohio
871 Posts

Profile of MagiClyde
I had a friend of mine who got over his jitters by performing a trick each day in front of a total stranger. Eventually he got over the shakes and performs quite well. I am presently following his advise. It is getting easier to perform in front of others.

Tameraz is right. The trick is the skeleton. I have seen 20-30 minute acts built around just one or two tricks and the rest being presentation. At that point, the magician has become an ENTERTAINER, not just a set of tricks performed one after the other. I, myself, have taken a trick called Alien Autopsy and built up a little story around it with a few sci-fi puns thrown in for effect.

Keep working on it and eventually you will mature into a fine magician.
Magic! The quicker picker-upper!
irossall
View Profile
Special user
Snohomish, Washington
529 Posts

Profile of irossall
My suggestion is to focus more on the storyline and the entertainment part of the effect and not the inner workings. After all the real point to Magic is the entertainment not the "how is it done" or "watch me fool you" dribble.
Iven Smile
Give the gift of Life, Be an Organ Donor.
scottds80
View Profile
Special user
Victoria, Australia
730 Posts

Profile of scottds80
Feel the fear and do it anyway. In time it will improve. It may always be there but you can use it as a substitute to positive energy
"Great Scott the Magician", Gippsland
scottds80
View Profile
Special user
Victoria, Australia
730 Posts

Profile of scottds80
Feel the fear and do it anyway. In time it will improve. It may always be there but you can use it as a substitute to positive energy
"Great Scott the Magician", Gippsland
Craig Dvorak
View Profile
New user
3 Posts

Profile of Craig Dvorak
I have the same problem but I will try my best and back to you guys in time, thanks for the great advice!

-Craig Dvorak
harris
View Profile
Inner circle
Harris Deutsch
8694 Posts

Profile of harris
Perhaps you could exaggerate and have your character be very jittery.

There are many ways to present your magic.

Years ago, I wanted to be a "leading man". Luckily I discovered character roles.
Of course these days characters are becoming "leading men".

Harris "my wife calls me her Jack Black" Deutsch
Harris Deutsch aka dr laugh
drlaugh4u@gmail.com
music, magic and marvelous toys
http://magician.org/member/drlaugh4u
wulfiesmith
View Profile
Inner circle
Beverley, UK
1112 Posts

Profile of wulfiesmith
Tell me Gilbert ...
how are the "jitters" going?

PM me my friend
Gilbert
View Profile
New user
Quebec, Canada
36 Posts

Profile of Gilbert
I would like to thanks everybody who gaved me adviced in here. They were great.
I had to do a gig today for one of my kid birthday party, and it worked great. At first I had the jitters, but not that much, and after a few tricks that are surefire, it was gone.
So thanks again everybody!
DaleTrueman
View Profile
Veteran user
Australia
314 Posts

Profile of DaleTrueman
Quote:
On 2009-11-14 17:52, Gilbert wrote:
I would like to thanks everybody who gaved me adviced in here. They were great.
I had to do a gig today for one of my kid birthday party, and it worked great. At first I had the jitters, but not that much, and after a few tricks that are surefire, it was gone.
So thanks again everybody!


It's quite some thing isn't (the jitters)

I had them last night when I performed my first ever "routine" (okay it was only two tricks)... but once I got started they died down somewhat

Good luck with future performances!
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Working around the jitters (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.1 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL