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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Rings, strings & things » » The art of knowing when to stop (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

mediamonk
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Walla Walla
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Okay, so I performed Greg Wilson's Pointless for a co-worker today and hit upon something. For those of you who don't know what Pointless is, the end of a Bic pen continually switches places. As I did the first switch, I got a jaw drop and a shaking head. By the time I got through the third phase, she was still having a good time. But, when I gave her the pen to examine she commented that "either you have two pens or..." I wasn't caught, but her mind was working fast. I believe that had I stopped after the first switch, it may have been an even more powerful moment than it was. Granted I work with a bunch of engineers and minds work fast around here, but I should have read the body language and just stopped there. Anyway, I guess the point is, you don't have to complete a full routine every time you perfom.
"There are two ways of living life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is." -Albert Einstein
huggie50
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North Las Vegas
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Good advice...I have found with that kind of effects you need to do it once, maybe twice and then quit.People catch on quick.
Magically yours,
Huggie
Maloney
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Newfoundland, Canada
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You not only have to look at your hands, but also look at one's body language and facial expressions. That will tell you when to stop.

I always observe my audience to see what's working and what's not. It's how we all get better!
The Magic and Illusion of Jordan Maloney
"Experience the Unexplainable"

www.jordanmaloney.com

Go check it out!
Mary Mowder
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Sacramento / Elk Grove, CA
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I had the enviable position of being apprenticed to Myrddin the Wizard.

Since he had poor peripheral vision it was often my job (among others) to stand in the spot just near his shoulder on one side when he was performing Close-Up to keep unobserved lurkers from hanging there. It allowed him to do effects he would not other wise have done in that situation.

It was wonderful watching people watch Magic. You can see how group dynamics effect the reactions, who to play to, people whispering guesses to a friend etc... It was great to see the reactions without the pressure of performing myself.

I can't tell you how much it has effected my choices in Magic especially the material I pursue. If you have a friend who is performing and it is appropriate for you to go along and watch, you can learn a lot. The more you do the more you'll learn.

-Mary Mowder
NurseRob
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Dallas, TX
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Mary you make a great point. I have the pleaseure of assisting an awesome street performer in his 7foot unicycle double straight jacket escape act. I have seen his show evolve over the past year, and have learned so much while the heat was on him and not me. I have avoided many mistakes by hanging out with the right crowd!
Ut imago est animi voltus sic indices oculi ~
The face is a picture of the mind as the eyes are its interpreter ~Cicero
Christopher Lyle
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Dallas, Texas
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Quote:
On 2009-11-05 21:49, NurseRob wrote:
Mary you make a great point. I have the pleaseure of assisting an awesome street performer in his 7foot unicycle double straight jacket escape act. I have seen his show evolve over the past year, and have learned so much while the heat was on him and not me. I have avoided many mistakes by hanging out with the right crowd!


NurseRob...

The crowd just called and said "leave us alone!"
In Mystery,


Christopher Lyle
Magician, Comic, Daredevil, and Balloon Twisting Genius
For a Good Time...CLICK HERE!
noble1
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There's truth in the old showbiz adage, "Leave them wanting more."
noble1
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Usually less is more.
meyegr
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Only able to muster
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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
John Long
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New Jersey
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The demo I saw of this made me think the basic method was going to be obvious to most people (but not all the details). Hence I wouldn't do it as a stand alone trick, but have it part of a series of other effects. By moving on to other things, I would think they would be less likely to analyze what must be happening.
mediamonk
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Walla Walla
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John, I think you may be right. The basic method, but not the details is fairly obvious. Given that I was in the office, going into a further routine wasn't going to happen, but it's good advice. I'm still thinking that for a quick trick the first switch is enough to get a reaction and allows you to just pocket the pen and move on.
"There are two ways of living life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is." -Albert Einstein
BCaldwell
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is really regretting his
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I think this rule applies to all magic. Many routines are far too long and what was amazing at first becomes less and less so as the routine progresses. Just my opinion...
"...that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." Dennis Miller Smile

~Bob~
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