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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Penny for your thoughts » » Calling All Musicians! (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Roger Kelly
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Kent, England
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Air Guitar - never dropped a note!
actorscotty
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wilmington nc
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Played lap steel, banjo, and bass for many years, toured with a cajun band for 20 years, and had a bluegrass band for a while, been a while but fave banjo piece is Whoa mule, fave cajun song I played on lap steel , was little black eyes(Tits Yeux Noirs)
Joshua Quinn
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with an outer triangle
2051 Posts

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Quote:
On 2010-01-16 10:13, pmc magic wrote:
I witnessed joshua quinn tearing up the piano in vegas...


You're too kind Paul, and I thank you, but believe me, there was no "tearing up" happening there. "Noodling" at best. Tearing up requires, at minimum, a piano I have room to sit down at, rather than leaning awkwardly against the wall behind me. Maybe next year, if the rumors of a Mindvention house band come to fruition, a tearing up opportunity will present itself.

So yeah, piano/keyboards is my thing. It's my real job, and has been for my whole adult life. As for correlations with mentalism, the things Al mentioned (tension and release, timing, creating anticipation, etc.) ring very true for me as well. Another interesting area of overlap is nonverbal communication, especially among high-level improvising musicians. I honestly believe that if an average non-musician watching something like, say, a Branford Marsalis quartet gig could comprehend the amount, complexity, and speed of information being passed around the stage nonverbally, it would literally seem paranormal to them. And not only is that a great bit of silent script for me, but it has also yielded some practical applications. One of my recent pet projects has been a "doing it for real" method of determining what song a person is thinking of, based partly on skills I picked up on the bandstand.

Speaking of Vegas, the first time I saw Penn & Teller's show, at some point I realized I was probably the only person in the audience sitting there thinking, "My god, how did he do that?!?", but about the piano player instead of the magicians.
Every problem contains the seeds of its own solution. Unfortunately every problem also contains the seeds of an infinite number of non-solutions, so that first part really isn't super helpful.
TonyB2009
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Guys for the sake of completeness, I will say that though I have worked with musicians I am tone-deaf and music has never played a part in my life. I don't own a radio or CD player, and the first time I used a CD during my act I couldn't get it to work - because I was trying to put in the CD the wrong way.

I have great admiration for people who combine two talents. I feel it would make for a very strong hypnotism show if you could play the keyboards etc during your show, rather than relying on a CD like I do.
Keith Raygor
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Naples, FL
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Played drums professional for 16 years on the road mostly, starting with the Air Force Band, then show bands with last 5 years doing studio stuff. Got to work extensively with Sorcar's son providing soundtracks for his TV shows in India.
Some keys and guitar and songwriting.

I combined my two disciplines (music and mentalism/magic) into a show several years ago called "The Rhythm of Magic" which explores the common threads of timing and rhythms that run between.

I've been able to present it at art halls, casinos and corporate events.
Here's the next show in about 10 days:
http://www.keiththemagician.com/ArtLeague.html

A highlight of the show for me is when an audience participant thinks of a song and I attempt to play it either on guitar or keys. I do this 3 or 4 times throughout the show. It's always a challenge and a surprise.

My favorite thing to play on drums is funk, ala Tower of Power, and on guitar is an old song by the Bee Gees called To Love Somebody.
My knowledge as a musician has helped a lot with stage presence and reading audiences.

But I will say that I very much miss the instant collaboration of improvisation on stage that mentalism doesn't supply. That is where the heart of music lies for me: creation born of a moment and another person.

Don, you haven't said if you play an instrument. What provides your inspiration, musically?
guitarmagic
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Southern Louisiana
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I am a guitar player with an eclectic taste, although roots music is a passion of mine whether it is gypsy jazz, reels, blues, old time, etc. BMI Publisher, writer & performer of 38 years and started playing guitar at the age of five; now I working as a Forensic Psychiatric Nurse currently for the last 9 years ... now I am studying magic and mentalism over this past year (and its like taking a drink from a fire-hose). I am now a serious student of magic and mentalism, hoping to grow and earn the right to be called a magician.

It is exciting to know that some of my magical / mentalist heroes are kindred spirits in the love of music! Life is grand!

All the best ...
Why is it that on one side of the world a person looks at a picture of the Grand Canyon and says, "it looks so real." At the same time on the other side of the world a person looks at the Grand Canyon and says, "it looks like a picture."
Sixten
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Floral Park, NY, U.S.A.
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Hi Don:

My story:

After hearing the song, "Wipe Out!", 1963, by 'The Surfaris', had to go out and buy
a snare drum. Practiced 5 hours a day, for 6 months straight. Then graduated to
a 23 piece Ludwig drum set, with all the 'bells and whistles'.
My favorite song, since then, "CrossRoads", by 'CREAM'.
By playing for the public, with my band, it gave me the confidence to be able to go out & perform our wonderful art.
If anyone is interested?, "Wipe Out!", by another group, 'The Ventures':
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8_EwAT8VM

Sixten
John C
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Eternal Order
I THINK therefore I wrote
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Yea, went thru this about a year ago with ... someone!

Drums. Here's one:

http://sundaynoon.org/oursongs/cd/inthelight.wma

J
The ULTIMATE Routine Series: rebirth soon!
IAIN
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england
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Guitar, both rythmn and lead for over twenty years, fretless bass for about 12 years...i can just about manage the opening riff of Starsky And Hutch on a Hammond Organ too...

Just bought a ukulele, which is interesting to learn, and its even got a les paul body...

I've been sampled on albums, and played either bass or guitar for a few bands in my time...
I've asked to be banned
Sixten
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Floral Park, NY, U.S.A.
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FWIW:
Allow me to throw "CrossRoads" on the pile:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdwVVI4B3oY
askernas
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Sweden
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SO ... I've played keybards in bands and sung in bands since I was 15 ... so that makes it a good 22 years now.

The most serious band I played with, We had from 1994 to .. well .. present. I did all the studio work on keyboards and production, and most of the songwriting. My friend that I started the band with did most of the lyrics.

Interestingly enough, I was the lead singer, and for the past 6 years, even though I play every note on the albums that we released, I don't play a note live, but "only" sing Smile

Played from Tallinn in Estonia to Los Angeles ! =)
Micke Askernäs
www.askernas.com
Sid Helkule
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Australia
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Quote:
On 2010-01-16 17:13, Sixten wrote:
FWIW:
Allow me to throw "CrossRoads" on the pile:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdwVVI4B3oY


Sixten, John Mayer does a darn good version of Crossroads on his new Battle Studies album, you should check it out.
Sixten
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Floral Park, NY, U.S.A.
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Thanks, Luke. (Just listened to it)
Nice and direct. In between Robert Johnson's original, and 'CREAM's.

Sixten
chmara
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Tucson, AZ
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Trained for Opera in my youth - started in musical theater - ended up on the road in folk music playing guitar -- then made my living as a disc jockey for a bit -- if that counts as music background. I stll dablle at "assembling" music -- I cannot call it composing because nothing is for publication -- just my amusement and use in shows.

Music training definitely helped with straight magic -- timing, background use, melding in key -- and is definitely needed for seance work. Never thought of it in terms of mentalism or mental magic. Maybe pacing would relate.

Hmmm - an operatic mind reader ???
Gregg (C. H. Mara) Chmara

Commercial Operations, LLC

Tucson, AZ



C. H. Mara Illusion & Psychic Entertainments
corsufle
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Music is my primary occupation. I love and play all different kinds.

http://philcampbellguitar.com/

My band's slogan is "Music is Magic"

http://www.hobbyhorsecafe.com/
Who is the Fool with the guitar?
Find out at HobbyhorseMusic.com
JohnWells
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The Southern Wild
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I sang opera at university, grew up playing piano in the /baptist church (I worked for the baptist catholics, presbyterians and pentecostals att the same time for several years), hold degrees in composition, certificates in both piano and vocal performance, and have lectured on post-tonal theory at the college level, in addition to my private students.

Jack Kent Tillar is an oscar winning composer and Jim Callahan plays a mean guitar, to add two to the list.
JohnWells
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The Southern Wild
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Genen Nielsen is a fantastic pianist, trained in composition as well.
Stmarkus
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New York City
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As a boy sang in 2 choirs. Later took piano lessons for 2 yrs. Then studied the trumpet a few years later, but still kept up playing the piano, which I found, I had a talent for playing by ear, as well as improvisation.
In high school, played the baritone, then after leaving school, sang in a local garage band. Went to college studied music theory and piano again. Later composed music for 2 Off Broadway productions here in New York. Went back to school and studied Audio Engineering. Currently still composing when I find the time.

......For the record, in the 1931 movie "Svengali" starring John Barrymore, he was also a musician/musicteacher as well as a hypnotist....Hmmmmm! Maybe there is something to this!!!
DT3
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Hill Valley
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Quote:
On 2010-01-16 13:06, Quinn wrote:
Quote:
On 2010-01-16 10:13, pmc magic wrote:
I witnessed joshua quinn tearing up the piano in vegas...


You're too kind Paul, and I thank you, but believe me, there was no "tearing up" happening there. "Noodling" at best. Tearing up requires, at minimum, a piano I have room to sit down at, rather than leaning awkwardly against the wall behind me. Maybe next year, if the rumors of a Mindvention house band come to fruition, a tearing up opportunity will present itself.

So yeah, piano/keyboards is my thing. It's my real job, and has been for my whole adult life. As for correlations with mentalism, the things Al mentioned (tension and release, timing, creating anticipation, etc.) ring very true for me as well. Another interesting area of overlap is nonverbal communication, especially among high-level improvising musicians. I honestly believe that if an average non-musician watching something like, say, a Branford Marsalis quartet gig could comprehend the amount, complexity, and speed of information being passed around the stage nonverbally, it would literally seem paranormal to them. And not only is that a great bit of silent script for me, but it has also yielded some practical applications. One of my recent pet projects has been a "doing it for real" method of determining what song a person is thinking of, based partly on skills I picked up on the bandstand.

Speaking of Vegas, the first time I saw Penn & Teller's show, at some point I realized I was probably the only person in the audience sitting there thinking, "My god, how did he do that?!?", but about the piano player instead of the magicians.


That's just awesome. Also, little known fact that Quinn played with Tony Clifton...I bet that's about as mental as you can get!

I love what Quinn touched on here about nonverbal communication, especially in regards to improv. Great stuff.

Man, we really have some very accomplished musical entertainers in our midst here don't we? I'm really enjoying everybody's thoughts and experiences so far!

Don
Jones_Unknown
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Geosynchronous Orbit above Earth
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I bought a cheap, used 5-string banjo in a pawn shop when I was about 21. I knew absolutely nothing about music, but I thought it might be fun to learn a little bluegrass. That was 34 years and 5 banjos ago.

I learned most of my pickin' licks as a street performer in New Orleans during the 70's, where the daily band was whoever had a guitar, banjo, fiddle, dobro and sometimes washtub or upright bass. There were also a ton of banjo pickers always passing through New Orleans that could teach ya a thing or two for a free beer.

A few years later, I wound up in Chicago. By this time, I was making my living as a standup comic, but my roommate was a folkie, playing at such clubs as the "Earl of Oldtown" and teaching guitar and dulcimer at the "Oldtown School of Folk Music. Naturally, there were always a ton of musicians jamming at our place and they welcomed me and my banjo anytime to join them. I learned quite a bit during that time period.

Most bluegrass pickers followed the picking/teachings of Earl Scruggs, but my favorite banjo picker was Doug Dillard of the "Dillards" (who were also known as "The Darling Family" on the Andy Griffith Show). I tried to master most of his stuff, but then became fascinated with the melodic work of Courtney Johnson with the "New Grass Revival", and that led me to Bela Fleck, so by the late 80's, I was experimenting in genres beyond bluegrass.

I never used my banjo in my comedy show, but it traveled the world with me for decades. It was my drug of choice...I'd unwind back in the hotel room by picking, using a banjo mute or removing the resonator and stuffing the back with a towel if it was late at night. One time I was in Knoxville, at a Holiday Inn, and the phone rang one Saturday afternoon. It was the front desk, inquiring if I was picking a banjo. I apologized and told them I'd stop immediately. "No, no", they replied. "We've had requests from some of the guests...they want you to open your door and windows so they can hear it better". LOL...only in Tennessee.

My banjo has almost as many stories to tell as I do.

JU
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