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epoptika
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Quote:
On 2010-05-20 13:40, Moxahalla wrote:
Shoot me for saying this...

The audience for Letterman is under 40 & "hip"...

WE know the performers this week are world-class...but do David's young lay audience see the performers as nothing more than pudgy, middle-aged, balding men - doing coin & card tricks that their nerdy Uncles used to do to them at birthday parties?

Where were the young, fresh, cool close-up guys?---Mmm, are there any?

(Playing devil's advocate, only)


Actually, David Letterman himself is past 60 and the median age of his viewers is 54 years old.
epoptika
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Quote:
On 2010-05-20 13:01, RiffRaff wrote:
Quote:
On 2010-05-20 11:44, TKO MAGIC wrote:
Just the way he walked out with confidence and complemented Dave and the band was smart, a true professional.


The band began playing during his set, just like they did to Carney. I think Palmer handled it perfectly.

Although I (along with many others apparently) thought the musical interludes were a bad idea I don't believe it was meant to rush the performers. I think Paul thought his musical bits were helping to punctuate the magic. He always throws musical "rim-shots" in through-out the show. A bad fit here, perhaps, but not maliciously motivated.

And I don't know why people continue to say Letterman was a jerk. I think he was on his absolute best behavior and, as others have pointed out, far more reserved than your average bar patron. Give Letterman credit for giving magicians two weeks of exposure on his show.
Andrew Zuber
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I enjoyed Steve's performance as well. A bit slow for my taste, but that's just a personal preference. I think he nailed it.
I'm surprised people didn't like the fact that JAP wore a tux on the show. That's in his character - it's how he performs. The staff at Letterman obviously aren't going to accommodate any special requests from the performers (Carney's quote made that clear) so why should the performer have to change his style? He was booked on the show because that's what he does. A tuxedo almost demands respect - he was a class act before he even sat down, simply because of what he was wearing. You don't see people complaining about the ripped jeans and ratty t-shirts that a rock band wears when they perform on the show. They'd look pretty ridiculous sporting khaki pants and a dress shirt and tie because it doesn't mesh with what they do.

Johnny wore what fits his act. Seems like a no brainer to me.
"I'm sorry - if you were right, I would agree with you." -Robin Williams, Awakenings
inidyls
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[ Pete Biro wrote:
LESSON? LIVE AND LEARN!

Frankly, they were all good magically, only difference was their personalities and good or bad breaks camera angle wise.

" I think Randall and Johnny Ace Palmer had the best personalities.





I doubt if the next day any laymen even remember any of the details, like the flashes or drops.

" A better question is do you think the layperson will remember the trick or magician in general?





IT WAS GOOD FOR CLOSE-UP MAGIC. Yes it Was.
[/quote]
inidyls
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It sounds like Steve Cohen did his homework , put a lot of thought into it, researched it , took control of the directors, Got help from fellow magicians , studied the show earlier in the work.

Lesson here???? Be prepared

I lost a lot of respect for John Carney. Making excuses saying it was out of my control and the "easy ... from an armchair at home comment." That was lame!!!
Be the expert and professional you say you are , everybody makes mistakes, own up to them.
Maybe you should have went the same route Steve did?

I loved your performance on Letterman the most, Just be humble. No excuses, we are only human. Everybody makes mistakes.
epoptika
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BTW; I forgot to mention that even though I'd read numerous posts before I watched Carney's performance on YouTube I did not see the orange or coconut flashing. Granted I was very focused on Letterman's face to see how he was reacting to the magic. I did not bother to replay the video. I thought the segment went very well and I found Carney entertaining and well up to the task. I agree that I would leave Bob Read's wand on my mantle and have a replacement made that looks a little less road weary.

I think it is wise to always try to watch these shows with a few non-magician friends if you want to know whether the show was a failure or success from a layman's point of view. It matters little what we think.

As for who did the best - I imagine you'd get a different answer from every layman you asked. One size never fits all.
TKO MAGIC
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Quote:
On 2010-05-21 13:52, inidyls wrote:
It sounds like Steve Cohen did his homework , put a lot of thought into it, researched it , took control of the directors, Got help from fellow magicians , studied the show earlier in the work.

Lesson here???? Be prepared

I lost a lot of respect for John Carney. Making excuses saying it was out of my control and the "easy ... from an armchair at home comment." That was lame!!!
Be the expert and professional you say you are , everybody makes mistakes, own up to them.
Maybe you should have went the same route Steve did?

I loved your performance on Letterman the most, Just be humble. No excuses, we are only human. Everybody makes mistakes.


JV,
I love ya and everything, but that is harsh.
John has every right to state how he feels. I don't think he was making excuses. I feel for John right now with a lot of people critiquing him. He'll always be one of my favorites.
Illucifer
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Not that it's a competition, of course, but John Carney still takes the prize in my book for the week so far. Palmer and Cohen were both very enjoyable, and did some fantastic magic, but neither of them really did what we call "yes, and" in the improv world. Carney seemed to do this instinctively. He took Dave's offers and offered back, whereas Palmer and Cohen seemed to be on a track they didn't wish to deviate from. When you refuse an offer or ignore it, you stop the scene cold. I didn't get the sense that they were really listening to Dave, but John was, and he was having fun with it.

Johnny Ace Palmer was smiling and having fun, but still was shutting Dave down a bit by not playing, I thought. I realize, of course, he has to contend with the fact that he has 3 live baby chicks loaded.
Steve Cohen, who is a very fine magician, comes across (at least, to me) as a bit condescending and pretentious.

Jason Randal actually seemed to listen and respond better to Dave, as well, but his magic simply made me wince. I don't consider him in the same league as these other gentlemen.
It's all in the reflexes.
merlyn2001sh
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I think the week's worth of entertainment was great on Letterman and all of the performers quite talented. With that said though this thread had quite a bit of debate over some effects with bad angles and possibly tipping things (ie the orange incident for example). While I agree that in that case for example, John did a great job with a difficult routine, part of me still believes that if you studied your audience (ie Letterman) ahead of time, he may have realized that camera angle was possible and taken steps to counter it. A flash is a flash is a flash and the best of us do it sometimes, but it shouldn't detract from the entertainment and that is one main reason why people today watch magic--for entertainment. If they like you, their brains will forget the flash. If they don't like you, they will remember things that didn't happen to justify it.

Just my .02
TKO MAGIC
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Quote:
On 2010-05-21 15:15, merlyn2001sh wrote:
I think the week's worth of entertainment was great on Letterman and all of the performers quite talented. With that said though this thread had quite a bit of debate over some effects with bad angles and possibly tipping things (ie the orange incident for example). While I agree that in that case for example, John did a great job with a difficult routine, part of me still believes that if you studied your audience (ie Letterman) ahead of time, he may have realized that camera angle was possible and taken steps to counter it. A flash is a flash is a flash and the best of us do it sometimes, but it shouldn't detract from the entertainment and that is one main reason why people today watch magic--for entertainment. If they like you, their brains will forget the flash. If they don't like you, they will remember things that didn't happen to justify it.

Just my .02


I agree
you guys might think I'm nuts but so far I liked Randall the best. Not his magic but his interaction with Dave. He was funny, charming, polite and made it about Dave.
As for the best trick from a magicians view , by far it was Carney. He had you looking every where, I love that trick. He is the BEST!
As for who looked more professional. Steve Cohen
Who managed the set/difficulties better By far it was Steve
Gianni
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Quote:
On 2010-05-21 13:07, Pete Biro wrote:

I doubt if the next day any laymen even remember any of the details, like the flashes or drops.


Unfortunately, there were several people discussing the flashes and drops on the Letterman website blog. Laymen are far smarter and observant than magicians like to think.

Gianni
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I also enjoyed Carney the best. He seemed to be "in the moment" and not rushing through a prepared speech. I also think he got the most out of each moment of magic.
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I came here...
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gaffed
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I think that perhaps some might possibly be losing sight of this entire thing.
How many nationally televised shows have EVER dedicated an entire week to close up magic?
And, especially from one as well known as David Letterman?
I would venture to say that most, if not all, people had no idea what close up magic is! They simply think of magic as, well.....magic, and then only think of people such as David Copperfield, David Blaine and errr…. Criss Angel ( Smile Smile Smile ) at least these very talented close up magicians have come to the public eye and can then be appreciated for a venue of magic that most people were never aware of before.

No matter how much one may do some Monday armchair quarterbacking here, this is just plain and simple…….DAMN good for magic!
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Futureal
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^ spot on.
Agaton
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I was glued on the TV set every night just to watch Letterman's Magic Close-up week. Randall, Carney, Palmer and Cohen did a wonderful job! Everyone knows the pressure and the strict conditions that you have to bear with on DL's set...plus the thought that you have to do something incredible and not end up with something that is safe. I admire their effort (and nerves of steel!).

Special mention to John Carney! I love his performance! Now we're off to Ammar!
Chad Sanborn
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Kudos to everyone so far and I hope Ammar doesn't disappoint.
So far from what I have seen, all but one has suffered from poor choice of material.
Randall, Carney, and Palmer should have chosen things that were less angle sensitive. There is plenty of stuff that would fit the bill. I understand that you want to do something familiar to you. But if it doesn't fit the venue, ditch it and go on to something else. This seems obvious to me and I am not sure why they resisted this idea. Carney admits he knew all the restrictions ahead of time. So why not tailor a better routine then?

Palmer was doing it right when he started with the coins and ring stuff but lost it with the cups and balls. Too angley and awkward loads.
Cohen did a better job with his set. His stuff was not nearly as angle restrictive. And so was a bit more magical. (personal opinion ahead-->)Sadly I thought he had a boring personality. But he was best prepared so far.

I am anxious to see what Ammar will bring to the table. He seems to have a good understanding of what works on TV and what doesn't, and is my bet to adapt the best routine for the restrictions.

Not sure why, but it really bothers me to see some of the best magicians out there suffering from not understanding the venue, and what they were getting into. Nervousness is one thing, but good performers channel it into the performance. I think most underestimated performing in front of the camera. Its a very daunting. I have been lucky enough lately to fall backwards into a small acting career and I can speak from experience that when they yell 'rolling' and the set gets quiet, and all eyes and cameras are focused on you waiting for the magic to happen, its quite unnerving. If I screw up, they yell cut and I get a second chance. There is no second chance on Letterman.

Anyway, enough of my rant. Go Ammar!!!

ps...To those who think Gazzo, or Malone might be better on this type of show, only think that because they can give back to David what he gives. Sharp, pointed one-liners. I would say to you that, that is probably the exact reason they don't get chosen!
jazzy snazzy
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The Little Hand! YAY!

And a BIG hand for Michael!
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The One
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I would've rather seen the coins through silk though.
I didn't come here to tell you how this is going to end...
I came here...
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teevtee
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Well Ammar clearly was the most comfortable, relaxed and natural as a guest. Dave seemed to like him and it was even a bit of an interview not just a performance.

However there was also no routine, just 4 simple tricks. I have a feeling that audiences will be impressed with Pressure though to me the method is so obvious as to not be a sound trick. Still, given the limitations he was probably wise to take this approach and I think he came off best of all.
ThomasJ
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I'm a little surprised Michael did the balloon trick (I think it's called Pressure by Danny Garcia) that every 14 year old exposes on Youtube. I enjoyed the phone vanish though.
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