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Magnus Eisengrim
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What would you like to see?

I'll have my scope out for a big public celebration in a nearby National Park on Labour Day, as I have for the past couple of years. So my question to you (especially those who don't normally do these things) is:

If I could show you something in the night sky, what would you most want to see with your own eyes?

(Please stay within the realm of possibility.)

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
George Ledo
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Horsehead nebula.
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
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gaddy
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Obviously that depends on the specs of your 'scope. If I had access to the most powerful scopes in the world (and space) I'd love to take a direct look at that lost Russian rover they recently found. That'd be kinda neat. But even the general area would be fun to explore.

Also the Planetoid Eris.
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Pakar Ilusi
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The Moon in as great detail as is possible with your telescope.

That would be nice.

And Mars.

Thanks Magnus Eisengrim! Smile
"Dreams aren't a matter of Chance but a matter of Choice." -DC-
EsnRedshirt
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Don't get me wrong, I love astronomy, but most nebulas look pretty dull unless they're either photographed with an extra long exposure, or reconstructed through false-color images (such as you'd see on NASA's web site.)

Hmm- what would I like to view? Are there any hills overlooking the Playboy Mansion or some equivalent site? ...
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George Ledo
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Quote:
On 2010-08-27 13:50, EsnRedshirt wrote:
Don't get me wrong, I love astronomy, but most nebulas look pretty dull unless they're either photographed with an extra long exposure, or reconstructed through false-color images (such as you'd see on NASA's web site.)

That's okay; I'd still like to see it thru a scope, before all the Photoshop and such. Smile
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Nosher
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If you've got a motorised mount, I'd like to see a planetary tour - or as much of a one as can be managed. Jupiter and Saturn especially are always a fantastic sight through a good telescope.
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Magnus Eisengrim
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Thanks for the suggestions. All of them are excellent.

From our viewing location, the only planets likely to be spotted will be Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus. There will be a couple of nebulae visible; I'll have to look into finding the horsehead; I've never seen it except in pictures, so I don't know if it is a possibility--Good call!

The planetoid Eris is a great call. I'll also have to do some digging to see if it is visible.

These are great. What I really want to know is what pops into your mind when you think of looking into space through a telescope.

And for those who are curious, I have a computer guided 8" Meade Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

john
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
MagicSanta
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My best friend is an astronomer. He built a Dobsonian scope in a class at Cal (Berkeley) taught by Dobson himself! See if you have a group called The Side Walk Astronomers in your area and they will have scopes set up you can see through.

(John, my friends scope is hand ground glass and the tube is a cement form! Works great)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dobsonian_telescope
Magnus Eisengrim
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I love the Dobsonian mount. My second scope is a 6" reflector on a Dobsonian mount I built. Dobson had the genius of low-tech.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
George Ledo
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Quote:
On 2010-08-27 15:47, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
These are great. What I really want to know is what pops into your mind when you think of looking into space through a telescope.

And for those who are curious, I have a computer guided 8" Meade Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Well, when I was a kid and wanted a telescope, I thought of galaxies. So even today I think of stuff like the whirlpool galaxy. A galaxy can't get more in your face than that.

Which model do you have?

We have an ETX-90 which we hardly use any more, but we've been plotting and scheming a trip to Death Valley and intend to take it along. I keep thinking about getting maybe TheSky and hooking the scope up to the laptop, but will probably settle for the AutoStar controller.
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
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Mary Mowder
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The surface of the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn would be my favorites.

My Brother brought up his telescope to watch a Lunar eclipse and while we were waiting we saw Jupiter, Saturn and Mars. You can see better pictures on the computer but there is something so immediate and real about seeing it live. I must say I was moved by the experience.

The reason I choose something so close is because you can actually discern details on the surface or moons that make for better viewing than a point of light.

A guy in the parking lot of a nearby store was letting people look at the Moon through his telescope one summer. I enjoyed it and it had a real effect on the kids I saw viewing as well. Local celestial bodies seem more accessible to inquiring young minds.

You are doing a wonderful thing.

- Mary Mowder
MagicSanta
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I had my scope out and a group of 'urban youth' walked by. I asked if they wanted to look and got a lot of 'yo yo yo...dat ain't tight' in return. Five minute later the most verbal one snuck back and spent an hour with me looking and never uttered a single 'yo'.

BAY AREA DUDES: The Lick Observatory above San Jose on Mt. Hamilton has a great viewing program that you may want to consider next Summer. The road is hairy but it is a wonderful way to spend an evening and the scopes are old style, huge, and amazing. I took my dad one year and as we finished the viewing and went outside a fire ball shot across the sky. You can see all the way to the SFO airport on a clear day and a few of the bay bridges. Here is a link, it is sponsered by CAL.

http://www.ucolick.org/public/sumvispro.html
Tom Cutts
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Seeing the actual rings of Saturn was quite an experience at the ripe age of 9. Kinda brings it all home.
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2010-08-27 19:34, George Ledo wrote:
Which model do you have?


I have an LX90GPS. And I think TheSky, while expensive, is excellent software.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
gaddy
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Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure ERIS is not visible with the equipment you're working with Smile
She's even beyond the orbit of Pluto...

I recently acquired the Google Sky Map program for my funky new smartphone...

I swear to you, this program was worth the price of the machine alone! Think of it as an "augmented reality" astronomy program, and you get the gist of what it's all about.
*due to The Magic Cafe's editorial policies, words on this site attributed to me cannot necessarily be held to be my own.*
GeorgeG
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I have an Meade 2080 8" SCT with none of the new GPS technology, but gets the job done. Aside from the night sky objects, I love seeing our own Sun with a Hydrogen Alpha filter I bought many years ago.
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2010-08-28 02:52, gaddy wrote:
Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure ERIS is not visible with the equipment you're working with Smile
She's even beyond the orbit of Pluto...

I recently acquired the Google Sky Map program for my funky new smartphone...

I swear to you, this program was worth the price of the machine alone! Think of it as an "augmented reality" astronomy program, and you get the gist of what it's all about.


YUP. I was looking through all my charts and lists, and it's out of my reach. With a slightly larger telescope and long exposure photography, it can apparently be captured by the backyard astronomer. And the horsehead nebula is likely too faint for my equipment and location (and it also won't rise until really late).

But it's good to know what's on people's minds. If somebody asks to see Eris, I can give a better answer as to why not than I could have yesterday.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
magicfish
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Titan
Magnus Eisengrim
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Quote:
On 2010-08-29 02:35, magicfish wrote:
Titan


Good call. Unfortunately, Saturn will be below the horizon that night.

John
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.--Yeats
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