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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Polly wants a cracker... » » Avian Polyoma in Parakeets and other birds » » TOPIC IS LOCKED (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Ryan Price
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This topic may have been discussed before but the search function isn't currently available so I will ask the question.

I was talking to a parrot breeder and he suggested that I don't get budgies/parakeets as they may carry Avian Ployoma which may kill other birds. Has anyone experienced this problem before or have any steps to prevent this. I currently have 4 doves aswell as an Alexandrine Parrot/parakeet. I obviously don't want to bring in an animal that may carry something that could kill my other birds.

Thanks
Skip Way
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Polyomavirus is a disease that destroys a birds immune system. It has no current cure and is passed from bird to bird. There is a vaccination with an annual booster available.

If your current birds are vaccinated, you should be alright. Still, buy the keets from a reliable breeder or dealer and have them tested and vaccinated by a vet before taking them home. I would keep the new birds quarantined away from the other birds until the negative blood test results come in. Your vet can advise you better on this.
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Cyberqat
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Yes, this is true with ANY new birds you bring into the house. Even new doves.

Birds at the breeders live in community, which means communicable diseases are reasonably common and range from mild to life threatening.

You should observe *strict* quarantine for the first 40 to 60 days with any new bird. (60 is better.)

(1) Place the bird in its own cage and far from other birds. (Best if its in another room altogether.)

(2) Keep hand sanitizer near the cage and wash and sanitize your hands *immediately* after interacting with the bird or its cage.

(3) Watch its poop carefully and watch for signs of "poofling" as my wife calls it (inflating the feathers, this is done in an attempt to insulate and shows that the bird has a chill or is otherwise trying to conserve body heat.)

(4) As soon as possible after it comes home, take it to the vet for a complete physical work up. We call this the "well birdie check-up". Birds should have one when they come home and then at least yearly after that.

If the bird does fine for 60 days you can introduce it to the flock with reasonable safety.

If you DO have a bird that is ill, you may have to quarantine the whole house for some time. We ended up with a canary that was tubercular (we couldn't save the poor fellow though we tried really hard). Luckily we were VERY careful about quarrantine and, 18 months later, everyone is still fine. But we will be in quarantine still for another 6 months til everyone is out of the woods and we can let our flock associate with new birds.
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Ryan Price
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Thanks for the info guys. I will definitly quartine the pair I get on one side of the basement away from the doves. My parrot stays upstairs so it shouldnt be a problem.

I am waiting to hear back from the vet to see how much the testing will be.

Is there anything else I should know/do?
bwarren3
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Ryan,
Quarantine means not even in the same room no matter how far apart they are.
Here's a great link to the experts...
http://www.avianbiotech.com/diseases/polyoma.htm

Bill
Cyberqat
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Interesting article.. .the one thing I was looking for that I couldn't find was if it was specific to hookbills or was trans-species.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
mysterious JO
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Another thing to watch for is Giardia in birds!
Cyberqat
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Really, you need to be vigilant for disease, period.

We could list them all day.

Last bird I personally lost was to tuberculosis.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
Dave Scribner
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Giardia, called Giardiasis or Giardia Lamblia, is the result of a parasite which causes an infection in the lower intestines of humans, dogs, cats, deer and beavers. I suppose it's possible for a bird to contract it but it's highly unlikely. It is mostly spread by ingesting water which has been contaminated by feces already carrying the disease and by handling or touching objects like diapers, bathroom sinks etc and then not washing your hands.

It is treatable and the symptoms last anywhere from 2 to 6 weeks.
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mysterious JO
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Giardia is a one-celled protozoal organism that is commonly found in pet and aviary birds. It lives in the small intestines (usually the duodenum) and is shed sporadically in the droppings. It may cause diarrhea, malnutrition and malabsorption in affected animals. In some birds, especially cockatiels, it may induce pruritis (itching), causing a bird to scream and pull feathers or dig at the skin with the beak. The skin of birds infested with giardia may appear dry and flaky. Most often, the underside of the wings, the insides of the thighs and perhaps the chest are plucked.

http://www.exoticpetvet.net/avian/giardia.html
Dave Scribner
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Obviously we have two different sources of information, which is common among bird and other animal owners, as to which animals can be affected. There is a possibility of transmission in birds if you are a breeder or someone with a large flock of birds, however, for the average owner with only a few birds which are properly caged, the danger should be minimal. Feed and water trays should be located high enough so that the bird cannot deficate in them. The disease is cause by ingestion of cyst infected fece's residue. Keeping the cage and feed/water dishes clean everyday will virtually eliminate the possibility or catching the disease.

Caged birds are far more susceptible to pneumonia and other respiratory infections than to this type of disease.
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Autumn Morning Star
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Dave, you are correct! Giardia is mostly gotten by drinking stream water that is rapidly flowing. Caged birds are not exposed, but your DOG is more likely to catch it from his fun swim/drink in the local park lake.
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