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Gypsyprince12
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51 Posts

Profile of Gypsyprince12
I spent a lot of time with wandering hitchhikers and Rainbow Families. Started living as a wanderer at the age of 15.Learned a lot but not about writing much. I'm also going through things that are bringing me down and keeping me from sleeping recently . Magic and dreaming of bringing smiles to someone is something that helps provide me with some hope.The question was suppose to be asked that is why I asked it. I did not want to wait.
I'm going to start taking some classes soon to help with my writing.So I hope to meet your standards the next time I ask a question here.

Thanks everyone for the response .
Cyberqat
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Inner circle
You can tell I work on the net from my
2210 Posts

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Remember... one of the best classes you can take on writing is to read great writers. If its available, I would actually suggest that a literature class that teaches close-reading skills might be more valuable then a creative writing class taught by someone who isn't a writer.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
DWRackley
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Chattanooga, TN
1909 Posts

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Quote:
I'm going to start taking some classes soon to help with my writing.So I hope to meet your standards the next time I ask a question here.

Gypsyprince12, classes are almost always beneficial, but I had little problem understanding your question, so your communication skills are adequate. For many posters here, English is not a first language, and you're doing better than some.

Now about acting...it's been said that a magician is an actor playing the role of a magician. There's a lot of truth to that, but it's not the whole story. I'm not sure it's even possible to "be yourself" in front of a large group. We always tend to "put on" a better version of ourselves when others are watching than we do when we're alone. And that's fine. You should learn what cloak to wear so that your presentation comes across to the audience in the way that you intend.

When I'm in a story, I assume the mannerisms of whatever character has the action. If I'm going for comedy, this is a great vehicle, as I can get laughs just by changing my voice from a gruff he-man woodcutter to a frightened little girl. For drama, it's equally important; my timing, cadence, even a little tremor in the voice all add to the telling. If I'm describing something far off in the distance, I look at it, my eyes focusing deeply into the horizon (People sometimes turn around to see what's back there, the effect is so powerful).

Acting is important, but it won't be the same techniques for everyone. Cyberqat is right on the money with reading. Find someone whose style you enjoy, and read it aloud to yourself.

Put feeling into it. Pretend you're Charlton Heston reading from the Bible. See how it feels. It may not fit you, even though you enjoy it personally. This is something you need to know. Try a different voice. Alter your cadence.

Ultimately you'll find the voice that fits you (it may or may not be far different from your own), and start practicing with that voice.

For pure "Scarey", I'd say go back and watch some of the old B&W horror movies with Boris Karloff or Vincent Price (anything from the age before "horror" came to mean grisley or gross). Listen to the drama in their voices. You may not want that for today's audiences, but it'll give you a vivid idea of how to control your speech.

Good luck. It's a long road, but you can have fun at every step.
...what if I could read your mind?

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NexusMagicShop
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Elite user
Sunny California
434 Posts

Profile of NexusMagicShop
Quote:
On 2010-10-16 16:35, DWRackley wrote:
Quote:
I'm going to start taking some classes soon to help with my writing.So I hope to meet your standards the next time I ask a question here.

Gypsyprince12, classes are almost always beneficial, but I had little problem understanding your question, so your communication skills are adequate. For many posters here, English is not a first language, and you're doing better than some.

Now about acting...it's been said that a magician is an actor playing the role of a magician. There's a lot of truth to that, but it's not the whole story. I'm not sure it's even possible to "be yourself" in front of a large group. We always tend to "put on" a better version of ourselves when others are watching than we do when we're alone. And that's fine. You should learn what cloak to wear so that your presentation comes across to the audience in the way that you intend.

When I'm in a story, I assume the mannerisms of whatever character has the action. If I'm going for comedy, this is a great vehicle, as I can get laughs just by changing my voice from a gruff he-man woodcutter to a frightened little girl. For drama, it's equally important; my timing, cadence, even a little tremor in the voice all add to the telling. If I'm describing something far off in the distance, I look at it, my eyes focusing deeply into the horizon (People sometimes turn around to see what's back there, the effect is so powerful).

Acting is important, but it won't be the same techniques for everyone. Cyberqat is right on the money with reading. Find someone whose style you enjoy, and read it aloud to yourself.

Put feeling into it. Pretend you're Charlton Heston reading from the Bible. See how it feels. It may not fit you, even though you enjoy it personally. This is something you need to know. Try a different voice. Alter your cadence.

Ultimately you'll find the voice that fits you (it may or may not be far different from your own), and start practicing with that voice.

For pure "Scarey", I'd say go back and watch some of the old B&W horror movies with Boris Karloff or Vincent Price (anything from the age before "horror" came to mean grisley or gross). Listen to the drama in their voices. You may not want that for today's audiences, but it'll give you a vivid idea of how to control your speech.

Good luck. It's a long road, but you can have fun at every step.


That's excellent advice DWRackley, I would also suggest paying attention to the intonations and cadence of radio Commercials, and Movie Trailers. These are professionals trying to conveigh mood, thought, Drama, etc. etc.

Something else to take a look at: http://www.americanaccent.com/intonation.html
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