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Cody Comet
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I'm a senior in high school and I see this all the time whenever I get to pull out tricks during the school day. One day, I decided to french drop my class ring and put it on my left thumb to make it look like it appeared on my thumb and I caught it in midair and despite how ridicously simple that sounds, it's floored everyone! And to consider that my schools most famous alum is Lance Burton, resulting in my school knowing a bit more about magic than the average layman, that's pretty amazing!
Cyberqat
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I dunno. I think self-workers have always been a way in and a part of the act. Most big stage illusion sare to one degree or another self-working. The stuff I do these days is a mix of self-working and me-working.

But a decent magician can always take a self-worker and make it work better Smile Self-working doesn't mean self-performing. And I believe 90% of the art is the performance and 10% at most is the technique.

My intro to magic was a series of self-workers when I was a kid. I used a marked/stripped eck for years until I learned how to do it myself and abandoned it. If nothing else, I think self-workers are great for getting new people into the hobby and for teaching them that its about a lot more then how well you do a pass...
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
Cyberqat
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By the way... the most amazing iullusio nI ever did was in highschool.

I used to carry coins and practice all the time. Sleights were my fidgets, to the point that my friends had all been programmed to expect certain things. One day, just fidgeting I did a french drop with nothing in my hands. A young lady I knew happened to be watching and she started... then turned my hands over fornt and back.. and then asked where the quarter went.

It didn't matter that there hadn't been one to begin with, to HER it had been there and then was gone.

That was probably MY first experience with the power of suggestion... and it was a totally non-verbal one.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
NexusMagicShop
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[quote]On 2010-10-16 22:50, Cyberqat wrote:

But a decent magician can always take a self-worker and make it work better Smile

________________

This line is priceless! So true.... But I still feel that every Magician should work on the classics. I know so many that call themselves Magicians, but don't know the french drop or even the Classic Palm. My Dragon trick was created, because when I was first learning coin techniques people would always say it's in that hand. I was sloppy and shouldn't have been performing for the general public. But it made me think I wish I had something that exploded when I opened my hand scaring my skeptic. The Dragon was born... And has become a difficult to master but valuable advanced gimmick in my arsenal. So I am not Gimmick free trust me, I just want to see people who are interested in Magic learn the classics before they call themselves a magician. And It will help them take there self worker and make them better just as Cyberqat states.
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CRMagius
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Quote:
On 2010-10-16 22:53, Cyberqat wrote:
One day, just fidgeting I did a french drop with nothing in my hands. A young lady I knew happened to be watching and she started... then turned my hands over fornt and back.. and then asked where the quarter went.


That... is hilarious. And something every noob like myself should take as a reminder that the real Magic is in what the spectator perceives.
DWRackley
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I try to remember that the audience doesn't think like we do. The result is really all they they know (or care) about.

I have no problem using gimmicks, but it probably won't be done in the same way as everyone else. I've used a Svengali on magicians and they never had a clue.

The important thing (IMO) is that if we were performing real Magic, we wouldn't need to cover it with a cloth or put it in a box. We'd just wave our hands and Presto! That's the stuff I look for: changing a coin while it's in the spectators hand; changing a card that they've already signed.

I remember one night out with some friends, a couple guys from another table came over and I showed them Out to Lunch. When one of them turned over the card, he jumped back (literally) and yelled, "My God! You're in league with the devil!" It's hilarious, and just so easy it doesn't even seem fair.

Sponge balls (rabbits, dice, etc) are great for that, because they can multiply, change or grow in the spectator's own hand.

(And if I do need to cover something, there's a reason: "so the glass can't escape" or "to help focus our concentration". It may be lame to us, but the audience needs justification.)
...what if I could read your mind?

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Dougini
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Quote:
On 2010-10-19 16:40, DWRackley wrote:
...We'd just wave our hands and Presto! That's the stuff I look for: changing a coin while it's in the spectators hand...


That is why I like The Raven. I usually don't go out prepared and set up to do magic. Most of my stuff is impromptu these days. But, The Raven changes a coin right in the spec's hand! If I knew I was going to a party, where I'm likely to be asked to do something, The Raven is my first choice. The Jack Miller Hold-out is also brought along, simply for Cut & Restored Rope.

I kept the most important things, as all of my larger props and effects were lost in the foreclosure. I like impromptu stuff for the simple reason I don't need preparation, or bulky stuff to lug around.

Doug
Cyberqat
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Out to lunch is a classic.

I've toyed with the idea of coming up with a different theme,... networked computers or something... that would be appropriate for my business cards and hiring an artist to draw it for me.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
trouser
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In reference to DWRackley's post, would you seasoned Café members kindly recommend some more good "in the spectator's hand" type of tricks? I would definitely like to use more of these. Also, I appreciate all the great comments in this thread.
Erdnase27
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On xxxxxxxxx, Cyberqat wrote:
The big lesson here is that what impresses us is not the same as what impresses they layman. .



For all newcomers read this carefully.. Again.. and yet another time. one of the most important concepts you as a magician will ever want to grasp.
"He must be content to rank with the common herd." - S.W. Erdnase
Cyberqat
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Quote:
On 2010-10-19 23:49, trouser wrote:
In reference to DWRackley's post, would you seasoned Café members kindly recommend some more good "in the spectator's hand" type of tricks? I would definitely like to use more of these. Also, I appreciate all the great comments in this thread.


I do a signed card in sealed box to audience member's hand routine I am quite proud of. I call it "The World's Most Complex Card Trick".

Its execution is a combination of an Extractor, an Elmsley count and a top-palm. If you'ld like the ordering of the whole routine PM me and Ill send it back to you.

Another really great commercial audience member's hand transposition effect is TOOSH.
It is always darkest just before you are eaten by a grue.
pgroff
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Quote:
On 2010-10-19 23:49, trouser wrote:
In reference to DWRackley's post, would you seasoned Café members kindly recommend some more good "in the spectator's hand" type of tricks? I would definitely like to use more of these. Also, I appreciate all the great comments in this thread.


If you like cards, there's always Dr. Daley's Last Trick.
othelo68
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Strange travelers, s**** coins across, scotch and soda, theses are some effect that happen in the spectators hand that I like.
volto
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Dougini - awesome that you also wear a miller holdout for impromptu stuff - I thought I was being weird... Smile

Impromptu stuff 'in the hand' - I've started doing a signed coin to impossible location (spellbinding boxes) where the coin is raven-style vanished from the back of their hand and 'instantly' jumps into the boxes. This generally gets 'what the...' style reactions, since everything is out in the open, and they 'see' the coin vanish. I have another version where the coin's in my hand and they hold my wrist, for when I don't have a holdout. There's careful timing and one sleight involved, but it pretty easy stuff. The sharpie is the wand in this scenario.

3d sponge bunnies kick ass. They're also excellent to carry, for 'go on then, pull a rabbit out of a hat' comments, because you can!
jeffdell
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Quote:
On 2010-10-20 07:06, MichielTummers wrote:
Quote:
On xxxxxxxxx, Cyberqat wrote:
The big lesson here is that what impresses us is not the same as what impresses they layman. .



For all newcomers read this carefully.. Again.. and yet another time. one of the most important concepts you as a magician will ever want to grasp.


I know it seems basic to many, but I have found that a Svengali deck impresses people as much as anything. Okay, it doesn't feel the same as doing a sleight of hand ambitious card routine (something I must most definitely improve on), but for the right audience its still a great effect. That mixed in with some other card tricks with a regular deck and you have something that's as powerful as anything in a magicians arsenal.

Jeff
DWRackley
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Some of my rules for Svengali (just me personally):

  1. NEVER show "all cards are the same". I can't think of anything in the entire realm of Magic that more screams "TRICK DECK!"

  2. Don't show "all cards are different". Like other things in Magic, if it's truly ordinary why would you even mention it?

  3. Be gentle with any riffles. L**g/s***t cards have a specific sound that your ordinary Wal-mart Bicycles (or any other deck) don't have.

  4. Buy a design that looks like something they find at home. To many "magic decks" have back designs that look suspicious.

  5. Learn some good false cuts. At least try to make it look like you're doing some of the work.


There's more, but this will go a long way improve your score. Smile
...what if I could read your mind?

Chattanooga's Premier Mentalist

Donatelli and Company at ChattanoogaPerformers.com

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jeffdell
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Quote:
On 2010-10-24 05:30, DWRackley wrote:
Some of my rules for Svengali (just me personally):

  1. NEVER show "all cards are the same". I can't think of anything in the entire realm of Magic that more screams "TRICK DECK!"

  2. Don't show "all cards are different". Like other things in Magic, if it's truly ordinary why would you even mention it?

  3. Be gentle with any riffles. L**g/s***t cards have a specific sound that your ordinary Wal-mart Bicycles (or any other deck) don't have.

  4. Buy a design that looks like something they find at home. To many "magic decks" have back designs that look suspicious.

  5. Learn some good false cuts. At least try to make it look like you're doing some of the work.


There's more, but this will go a long way improve your score. Smile


DWRackley;

Good tips indeed. One thing I'm very much guilty of, a general magic no-no in my book, is stating the obvious when doing a trick. Your rule about showing cards all different or all the same with a Svengali deck is a really good one. I personally have a tendency to restate the obvious at times rather than just letting the visual image stand on its own. Saying "my hand is empty" versus just showing my hand is empty or saying that the deck is shuffled rather than just shuffling (falsely or otherwise)draws suspicion. With good audience rapport and audience management, those types of comments once in a while go unnoticed. Do that enough and your audience will be suspicious.

Jeff
Dougini
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Quote:
On 2010-10-22 04:54, volto wrote:
Dougini - awesome that you also wear a miller holdout for impromptu stuff - I thought I was being weird... Smile


No, Volto. Not weird. Prepared. Actually, I usually don't wear the Raven or Holdout unless I know I'm going somewhere that I might be asked to do magic. Sometimes I just set myself up for it. An impromptu trick usually does it. Then, rock 'n roll time!

The holdout is just for The Cut & Restored Rope. I don't use it for anything else. The Raven is for coins only. I never wear both, but I usually have them on me if I need to "take a break", and return. I measure up the situation first, and then decide which to use.

Mostly, it's easier to do impromptu coin magic, or Prohibition, or whatever is handy to vanish or penetrate. Even rubberbands, if they are there. I don't wear jewelry, so I have to carry the item necessary for Prohibition in my pocket.

Doug
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