The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Why do American magicians still use English Pennies? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
Lawrence O
View Profile
Inner circle
Greenwich (CT)
6799 Posts

Profile of Lawrence O
The copper silver routines are great but the change of currency suggests a switch. I'm using copper plated silver coins for changing the nature of the coin rather than suggesting skill instead of magic by claiming an invisible switch.

For the American magicians who would wish to use their own currency in copper to go one step in that direction, there are copper pennies of the size of a dollar on ebay.

It's nice in a copper silver routine to make a penny grow and them make it change for a silver dollar with some form of Spellbound effect (one handed Marion Boykin's way is naturally even more deceptive)

This offer a misdirecting logic consistency that the use of an English penny doesn't offer
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
Michael Rubinstein
View Profile
V.I.P.
3953 Posts

Profile of Michael Rubinstein
I would respond by saying that for copper silver routines, the copper penny offers a nice contrast to the silver half dollar, and the equal size makes for consistancy. for spellbound, what catches the eys isn't the type of coin, but rather the imediate change into another metal. The emphasis is on the color change, not the type of coin. If all the years I have performed spellbound, no one has ever said, "but its a different coin". They inherently know that its a different coin, but the illusion is that of a change. If you have a plated coin, or a painted coin, the thought will still be of a different coin, regardless of the illusion you present. A giant penny is of itself a fake coin, regardless of the equal size to the dollar.
ONLY A FEW BOOKS LEFT AVAILABLE FOR SIGNING!!! First edition and reprint of Rubinstein Coin Magic sold out in RECORD TIME! The good news, though, is that I have reprinted the book once again (they are selling like hotcakes!), so there are enough for everyone!! As such, and for the last time, I again have a VERY limited supply of books left that I can sign. All come with a special FREE GIFT (worth over $25!) until supplies are gone, so first come, first serve! To order, be sure to send me an email at rubinsteindvm@aol.com . The books usually ship the day after the order is received (excluding weekends)!
RUBINSTEIN COIN MAGIC- The biggest book on coin magic since Bobo's Modern Coin Magic, and the most important since David Roth's Expert Coin Magic! Hardbound, 500 pages, 20 chapters of state of the art coin magic illustrated with 930 crisp photos! A contribution chapter from over 20 of the world's top coin magicians! This will be the book against which all future books on coin magic will be measured! Already called a Modern Classic!!
And if anyone (USA ONLY) needs some of the coin stuff used in the book, shoot me an email at rubinsteindvm@aol.com as I have some limited supplies of coins and props used on the book.
Sammy J.
View Profile
Inner circle
Castle Rock, Colorado
1785 Posts

Profile of Sammy J.
Lawrence,
Those jumbo pennies are twice as thick as a silver dollar. I bought a few of them. The Sudberries are better, but still somewhat thicker. I have a few of them as well.
I think Michael makes a good point. It is a different coin, but it is a color change.

I do have some copper and gold colored Kennedy halves. I will have to try some spellbound routines with them.
Thanks for your thoughts.
Sammy J. Teague
Sean Giles
View Profile
Inner circle
Cambridge/ UK
3727 Posts

Profile of Sean Giles
I always thought the magic was in the coin changing to a different coin. The contrast in colour helped to illustrated this. For instance, in a CSB routine I don't think the illusion would be helped if the coins were 3 different colours of the same coin. It's the coins changing places that gives it the strength. I think the same is true for copper/silver routines. The switch, rather than the colour change is where the magic is. At least that's how I've always seen it.
jim ferguson
View Profile
Loyal user
Ayrshire, Scotland
281 Posts

Profile of jim ferguson
I think it depends greatly on the effect you wish to create. For a standard copper/silver routine where the coins switch places, using an English Penny and a Half Dollar is perfectly acceptible, and is probably enhanced by the difference in the coins. However if the intended effect is that of say, turning a half dollar to gold, then I feel it is important to keep it to a TRUE colour change. In this case a gold plated Half would be better, rather than just any gold coloured coin. What many magicians seem to miss is that the coins we use actually determine, to a degree, how the audience see the effect. Take the example of turning a coin to gold - I have seen many performers doing this, but they use just ANY gold coin that is the correct size. In my opinion this changes the actual effect. It is no longer a true colour change of silver into gold, it is a transformation of one coin into a totally different coin. Its a subtle, but in my opinion important point that we should keep in mind. jim
RS1963
View Profile
Inner circle
2714 Posts

Profile of RS1963
Michael Rubinstein hit the nail right on the head. Any other thought is just magicians thinking too much and for no reason. It's the change that matters. No one cares that the coin is not a U.S. coin when the change happens. Sometimes what magicians think is illogical and needs to be changed doesn't need to be changed. Changing the effect is often what is illogical.
jimvines
View Profile
Regular user
Brooklyn, NY
161 Posts

Profile of jimvines
Nobody uses half dollars anymore either, so why not an English penny? My halfs are silver, from the 1920's. An English penny is similarly exotic. Those big US pennies just look like fake coins / gag coins to me.
LotaBowl.com

The Search Engine for Magic Supplies.

Search 1,000,000+ Products From 40+ Magic Dealers.
Jonathan Townsend
View Profile
Eternal Order
Ossining, NY
27097 Posts

Profile of Jonathan Townsend
Back when Tannen's was on Broadway, there was a coin shop on the block and a friendly jewelry place across the street where they did polishing and plating. Getting things plated sufficiently that they look like solid metal and won't wear down after a few weeks of handling, then toned to where they look right is non-trivial.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Dorian Rhodell
View Profile
Inner circle
San Francisco, CA.
1632 Posts

Profile of Dorian Rhodell
I can't answer for anybody else here but I only use an English Penny in one effect. And the reason for that is because the premise demands that one be used. In other words, my presentation dictates which coins I use.

Best,

Dorian Rhodell
Meshuggina
View Profile
New user
92 Posts

Profile of Meshuggina
I've got some plated coins, and I used them for a bit, but I found people became more suspicious of a copper half than an old English Penny. The copper half has obviously been messed with, so it seems to get them thinking down the path of "something's fishy here, can I see that funny half dollar" instead of just "hey, some old coins" which they can then look at if they wish. I like my Barber halves, so it's also nice to get a fairly well matched and worn English Penny for the set. I did have a couple routines I played around with a bit with coins affecting and rubbing off on each other, in which case the plated coins make sense, because it fits into the routine. I agree that the big pennies also seem kind of fishy as well. I find they work better as a finisher coin for a dime and penny routine than working with a silver dollar, because (imho) it "cheapens" the effect of a nice old Morgan or Peace dollar (or even an Ike).

I find the change of the coin only strengthens the effect. If you start with a coin the spectators haven't seen, then inspect it, then switch it into something else they've never seen, it is even more interesting.

Americans also still have a soft spot in our hearts for England. We WERE a British colonies originally, after all... That just adds further interest and misdirection. A big penny just generates questions of "where did you ever find that big fake penny?"

Just my two (English) cents...
Julie
View Profile
Inner circle
3393 Posts

Profile of Julie
I agree. It's perfectly reasonable and sensible to use an English penny in it's natural state with an American half dollar. The contrast is the importent element.

Years ago I had all my gimmicked half dollars remade in 1976 Bicentenial coins. This provides an interesting and logical justification in my presentation for using half dollars.

Julie
magicalaurie
View Profile
Inner circle
2863 Posts

Profile of magicalaurie
I'm going to say we're talking about magic here. A magician can change a coin into whatever she Smile wants, yes? Including another coin. It's fairly standard to hear, "And it changes... to a copper coin."
An English Penny is a copper coin. I don't necessarily use English pennies, at the moment, but I will.
Denis Bastible
View Profile
Loyal user
Buffalo, New York
293 Posts

Profile of Denis Bastible
I always use a little story about the history of the English Penny and what is on each side- people love to look at them and marvel at the dates (some I have go back to the late 1800's. A mini history lesson is a good thing
magicalaurie
View Profile
Inner circle
2863 Posts

Profile of magicalaurie
I agree. I do that with my 1949 Franklin halves.
Pete Biro
View Profile
1933 - 2018
18558 Posts

Profile of Pete Biro
POKER CHIPS.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Adam Keisner
View Profile
Veteran user
London
335 Posts

Profile of Adam Keisner
Why do American magicians still use English Pennies?

Because they have no cents. Smile
Merc Man
View Profile
Inner circle
Nuneaton, Warwickshire
2649 Posts

Profile of Merc Man
Quote:
On 2011-01-19 13:06, Adam Keisner wrote:
Why do American magicians still use English Pennies?


Probably for the same reason English Magicians use half dollars - a lack of any creativity!

In the UK, we have a £2 coin that is an excellent size/design for coin magic - not to mention its two-tone metal, weight and a milled edge. To compliment it, we have the heptagon shaped silver 50p and the similar sized copper 2p - I can never remember such diversity in our coinage. Despite this, English magicians use half dollars, old English pennies (that about 50% of our folk haven't even seen) and fake looking magic 'Chinese' coins.

Why do they use these? Possibly because they are influenced (brainwashed?) by the plethora of DVD's now available; and cannot think for themselves. As I said at the outset - a complete lack of creativity.

Maybe that's harsh - I really don't know. All I do know is that I would never use coins for an effect that couldn't be borrowed (if the need arose) from spectators.
Barry Allen

Joe Riding
20th May 1932 - 23rd April 2005

Thank you for making me an entertainer. I still miss ya mate.
magicalaurie
View Profile
Inner circle
2863 Posts

Profile of magicalaurie
Merc,

You've got a point, most definitely, but please allow for the exceptional. Smile

-magicalaurie
Pete Biro
View Profile
1933 - 2018
18558 Posts

Profile of Pete Biro
I liked to use Australian pennies because of the patter possibilities with the Kangaroo on 'em mate.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Sean Giles
View Profile
Inner circle
Cambridge/ UK
3727 Posts

Profile of Sean Giles
Merc, are you suggesting that magicians like David Roth, Michael Rubinstein, mike Gallo, Eric Jones and Curtis Kam use English Pennies and fake Chinese coins because they lack creativity? Could it perhaps be that these coins are the perfect size, contrast well and generally compliment each other.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Why do American magicians still use English Pennies? (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.22 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL